Thomas Langton CHURCH

CHURCH, Thomas Langton, K.C., B.C.L.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Broadview (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 1, 1870
Deceased Date
February 7, 1950
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Langton_Church
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b4773d7c-fb30-477a-9d14-c076e60905ac&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Toronto North (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Toronto Northwest (Ontario)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Toronto Northwest (Ontario)
September 24, 1934 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Toronto East (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Broadview (Ontario)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Broadview (Ontario)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Broadview (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Broadview (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 861)


December 8, 1949

Mr. Church:

It is just all talk; that is all it is.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ELECTRIC POWER
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December 8, 1949

Mr. T. L. Church (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, how did Canada vote last Tuesday in the United Nations committee regarding a plan to give Jerusalem an international form of government? Has the government any announcement to make on the subject? In the event of Canada's supporting it, how will effect be given to it? What army will be assigned by Canada to it, either by voluntary recruiting or otherwise? Has this last-mentioned matter been considered by the government?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT FOR JERUSALEM
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December 8, 1949

Mr. T. L. Church (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker,

I have a question which I might have raised as a question of privilege. I am addressing it to the Secretary of State for External Affairs. In view of the statement made in this morning's issue of the Globe and Mail and in other newspapers I would ask him these questions:

First, has the government any further information on the development of power in the Niagara river? Officials say that nothing has happened there since 1920 or 1922.

Second, what hopes are there for the ratification of any treaty separately? The treaty with respect to additional power at Niagara was before the house in 1922 and 1923. Has the attention of chief officials of the government been called to a statement by chief officials of the Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario, who have been asking ratification of this for twenty months? A spokesman for the Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario has said that the report made in the house yesterday is erroneous; one of them went so far as to say-and used a word which I do not think should have been used-that it was "silly".

Is there any change in the international section of the St. Lawrence river regarding the use of power, either separately or in conjunction with the seaway plan? Will any further information be forthcoming before the session ends on these important matters? -because, as I said yesterday, no doubt blackouts are due in Ontario and in other places owing to the scarcity of power. Nothing has been done in the matter whatsoever. The Secretary of State for External Affairs should make a statement about it.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ELECTRIC POWER
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December 8, 1949

Mr. Church:

Mr. Chairman, I do not intend to ask the Postmaster General a number of general questions because he is new to the position and probably it would not be fair, but I should like to call his attention to certain conditions in the Toronto post office.

The revenue and surplus obtained by this department in Toronto is considerable. In

1946 it amounted to nearly $11 million, but then the cost of rural mail delivery was charged against the surplus revenue and in

1947 it dropped to a surplus of $8,773,000, and in 1948 to a surplus of $9,827,000.

In view of the large surplus, would it not be possible to pay something additional to the low-paid employees of the post office? Ten thousand extra employees will be taken on during the Christmas season to help deliver mail, and they should be paid at a proper rate. I can remember when the Minister of Public Works, along with the former postmaster general, Mr. Mulock, accompanied me on a tour of the Toronto terminal "A" post office in order to see the conditions under which the workers were sorting the mail. There is one large room there that is not really fit for human habitation. There is hardly any ventilation.

Employees should not be asked to work under such intolerable conditions.

I should like to compare the postal revenue of Toronto with that of Montreal, the chairman's district. I admit that in Toronto considerable revenue is derived from the two large departmental stores, but, eliminating that factor, the postal receipts for Montreal are about $10,500,000 as compared with $16,500,000 for Toronto. Yet we have no post office in that city. There is a terminal "A" which was built by the old Grand Trunk and then taken over by the Canadian National Railways and used as the main post office.

I should like to direct the attention of the Postmaster General to the difficulty encountered when trying to buy postage stamps. Many people will be travelling this Christmas, and they should be able to buy stamps on the trains, or at least in the larger railway stations. Many soldiers will be going home for Christmas, and they should be able to let their people know that they are coming.

I should like to see some action taken to give the low-paid workers a better deal as to pay and working conditions. An effort should be made to improve their hours of labour and their working conditions. With the amount of second-class mail they have to handle, they all have humps on their backs. I have seen them delivering mail in the various districts of our city. The amount of second-class mail that must be delivered is an intolerable burden on the poor postman who has to go out in weather such as we are having at the present time. There should be some other way of making effective second-class delivery. I hope that the minister, if he gets an opportunity during

the recess, will come to Toronto and investigate the post office situation. He has a good deputy and other competent officials in the department. In fact I know of no department of the public service that has more support of the people than the post office.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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December 8, 1949

Mr. Church:

Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO CALLING OF COMMONWEALTH CONFERENCE
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