Roger John GALLAWAY

GALLAWAY, The Hon. Roger John, P.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Sarnia--Lambton (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 23, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Gallaway
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b27bbbc1-eea6-411d-a831-44c50e747606&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
politician

Parliamentary Career

October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Sarnia--Lambton (Ontario)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Sarnia--Lambton (Ontario)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Sarnia--Lambton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons with special emphasis on Democratic Reform (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Sarnia--Lambton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons with special emphasis on Democratic Reform (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 74)


November 17, 2005

Hon. Roger Gallaway (Sarnia—Lambton, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order concerning the motion before us which you have just read, and I wish to submit to you that it is out of order in that it would ask you as Speaker to do that which is an impossibility. It is a constitutional impossibility because it offends the practice and the constitutional form and design of how the House must properly communicate with Her Excellency the Governor General, because it asks you to transmit a resolution, if passed, of the House to Her Excellency.

I point to Beauchesne's fifth edition at page 37, which outlines the role of Speaker as the representative of members of the House. It lays out the House's relationship to Her Excellency the Governor General. It is enunciated there that there are three times or methods when this occurs: first, upon your election as Speaker, you petition the Governor General for the continuance of the Commons' privileges; second, you personally deliver an engrossed Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne to the Governor General; and third, and the most common example, you lead us when summoned by the Governor General to the other place.

If the House wishes to collectively communicate with Her Excellency, it can only be by address to Her Excellency. That is our constitutional design. That is the form of communication which the House might only engage in with Her Excellency.

I point out to you, Mr. Speaker, that in the same fifth edition of Beauchesne's at page 123, it lays out a form of address for when the House wishes to communicate with Her Excellency. It is a very rare occasion other than the reply in the address to the Speech from the Throne that the House wishes to address or communicate with Her Excellency the Governor General. History will show us that it is a very rare event indeed.

If we go back to the time of William IV in Great Britain just prior to Queen Victoria, there were events when the House of Commons wished to communicate with the king and it was done so by an address. It is a very particular form of communication. To my knowledge, it has never been carried out in this place in a form like that laid out in this motion.

Mr. Speaker, knowing that there is a particular constitutional demand upon how we speak to the Governor General, and knowing that this, if passed, would ask that you transmit this resolution to Her Excellency the Governor General, what is the transmission? Is it an email? Is it a phone call? Is it a courier delivering a resolution of the House? It is a rather peculiar way of doing business knowing that the Crown is the head and the font of power in this place.

Therefore, knowing that this transmission is not defined and knowing that this is an unknown way of communicating with the Crown as represented by Her Excellency the Governor General, I would submit that this is a resolution which is an impossibility from a constitutional point of view. It is also an impossibility from a plain language point of view because we do not know what a transmission is. Therefore, I would ask that you rule it out of order.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Supply
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November 16, 2005

Hon. Roger Gallaway (Sarnia—Lambton, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both officials languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Transport.

In accordance with its order of reference of Thursday, October 27, your committee has considered votes 1a, 5a, 10a, 20a, 35a and 40a under Transport in the supplementary estimates (A), 2005-06, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2006, and reports the same.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
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September 28, 2005

Hon. Roger Gallaway (Sarnia—Lambton, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased also to present a petition signed by a number of residents of Ontario. Similar to the last petition presented, it deals with the subject of autism and that autism is increasing in numbers in our child population.

Similarly, the petitioners call upon Parliament to amend the Canada Health Act and regulations to include IBI intensive behavioural intervention therapy as part of the necessary medical treatment.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
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June 23, 2005

Hon. Roger Gallaway

Mr. Speaker, once again, my friend opposite is somehow tying Bill C-38, Bill C-43 and Bill C-48 together. This is a very simplistic view of the way this works. It is a very simplistic way and the notion of representation is more than just a notion, it is a constitutional obligation upon members of the House.

If one were to take the simplistic view of the member opposite that because someone is opposed to one thing, he or she is opposed to everything, I must ask him if that is indeed the case? How does he reconcile that there are a number of people in his caucus who are supporting the government on Bill C-38, but are opposing Bill C-43 and Bill C-48? How does he reconcile what he says is my inconsistency with the inconsistency which already exists in his caucus?

I find this a fascinating concept. He is saying that the position of his party is to oppose Bill C-38 and apparently that is true. But within their very own ranks, there are people who are supporting Bill C-38. Perhaps when the Conservatives resolve that issue within their own caucus, he could bring that question back again.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Extension of Sitting Period
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June 23, 2005

Hon. Roger Gallaway

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Extension of Sitting Period
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