John Livingstone BROWN

BROWN, John Livingstone

Personal Data

Party
Liberal Progressive
Constituency
Lisgar (Manitoba)
Birth Date
February 7, 1867
Deceased Date
March 20, 1953
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Livingstone_Brown
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b1d5c682-1934-44e3-8c98-235be860bb63&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, minister

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Lisgar (Manitoba)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Lisgar (Manitoba)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB-PRO
  Lisgar (Manitoba)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB-PRO
  Lisgar (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 361 of 362)


March 31, 1922

Mr. BROWN:

Another thing that the

Government might well consider is the question of what statistics are really valuable, and what are not. As an illustration of statistics that are not very valuable I recall the case of a man in our community who used to bucksaw wood and who could tell you at the close of the day exactly how many sticks he had cut. He marked it down and kept a faithful record; in other words, he accumulated statistics. We had a very ponderous volume put into our hands since we came here, the Canadian Atlas, a magnificent volume, splendidly printed on paper of excellent quality. I turned over the pages the other day and I came across this heading: "Tons of freight per head of population." Now, that information is entombed in this ponderous volume. It reminds me of going into a museum and finding the mummies of cats and hawks and other vermin that were taken from the pyramids of Egypt. The Government might very well consider whether it is wise or necessary to publish statistics that are not of permanent value. One of the things that makes us speak as we do in regard to the reduction of expenditure is that the wheat crop of Manitoba is said not to be able to pay the taxes of this year.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE BILL
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March 31, 1922

Mr. BROWN:

I would like to get at the facts of the case, and see where we stand. Perhaps it is not our part to lecture political opponents or political friends, but I think a little less pugnacity on the part of the Minister of Labour would enable us to arrive at an understanding of the situation. I think, perhaps, we understand the situation regarding the permanent employees. There were 106 last year and there are to be 117 this year. I presume the statutory increases provided in the Civil Service Act cover that amount, making the average salary last year $1,619 and the average salary .this year $1,667. I suppose that is accounted for by the working out of

that machine which we have created, and for which we do not seem to have provided any brakes. However, that is a matter for discussion later on, but that is the way it has impressed us so far. We have made a machine we do not seem able to control. If there is a brake we have not been able to get our hand on it yet. The question seems to centre around a little question of fact: were those temporary employees last year paid out of that contingency fund of $35,000 or were they not?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE BILL
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March 29, 1922

1. Who are the leaseholders of the hay lands on the Dominion Government Lands known as the St. Peter's Indian reserve?

2. When do these leases expire?

3. Is it the intention of the Government to renew said leases?

Topic:   ST. PETER'S INDIAN RESERVE
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March 27, 1922

Mr. BROWN:

My remarks applied not merely to the Militia Department but to all departments of the service.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   EDITION
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March 27, 1922

Mr. BROWN:

I would urge upon the Government the necessity of giving consideration to the demand which exists throughout the country for a reduction in the staffs of the Civil Service. The impression prevails generally throughout the country, and is shared in by myself to a very large extent, that civil servants are treading on one another's toes, so tremendously is the Service over-manned. To what extent that is true we are not in a position to say, but since coming here we have not seen anything that would tend to dispel the impression that we had when we came. If the Government could do anything to dispel the impression that the service is tremendously over-manned or over-womaned, as the case may be, or could do anything to reduce the overhead expenditure, I am sure it would receive the commendation of the people of this country.

Supply-Naval

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   EDITION
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