Peter John VENIOT

VENIOT, The Hon. Peter John, P.C., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Gloucester (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
October 4, 1863
Deceased Date
July 6, 1936
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Veniot
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b155bd78-8adb-481a-8fd1-4d1b36d4daff&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
insurance agent, journalist, newspaper owner

Parliamentary Career

September 14, 1926 - September 24, 1926
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
November 2, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
  • Postmaster General (September 25, 1926 - August 6, 1930)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
  • Postmaster General (September 25, 1926 - August 6, 1930)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 994)


April 28, 1936

Mr. VENIOT:

On a policy of insurance.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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April 24, 1936

Mr. VENIOT:

Yes, six hundred pounds

per day each way. At the rate of five cents per letter it was estimated that we could make it pay on that basis. In a pound of mail there are about fifty or fifty-five ordinary letters; in many cases it runs to sixty letters, which at the five cent rate would be S3 per pound for air mail service. Now the rate is six cents per letter, and I feel satisfied that if a proper survey of the trans-Canada air service was made it could be put into operation. I think the people now have been educated to use such a service; they see the benefit of it. In its initial stages they did not anticipate what that benefit would be, but now they appreciate it and I think such a service would be a success. A great deal of air mail was carried up to 1930.

I do not wish to take up too much of the time of the committee, Mr. Chairman, but let me point out the advantages of the air mail service. In 1927 and 1928, in the Mackenzie valley, and as far north inside the arctic circle as Aklavik, it cost the Post Office Department $41,000 for a mail service once each month in the summer time and once every two months in the winter time. When we called for tenders inaugurating the air mail service into the Mackenzie valley from the head of steel we got the service for only $5,000 more than the service which had been given, and rendered it fortnightly.

At that time we inaugurated an air mail service between Montreal and Albany which developed into a paying proposition. In order to give Toronto a footing equal to that of Montreal we attempted to inaugurate an air mail service between Toronto and New York, and there again between 1928 and 1930 the Post Office Department did not get from the business men of the large city of Toronto the encouragement the department deserved for the advances it was making in air mail delivery. That project had to be abandoned after a time; I believe it was abandoned by the late government, and I am not criticizing them for taking that action.

I heard a remark which, I think, should not be allowed to go unchallenged. Whether it referred to the internal administration of the Post Office Department or to the postal service in general, I do not know, but I interpreted it as referring to the Post Office Department in general. The statement was made that we had the most antiquated service known. Let me point out-

Topic:   POST OFFICE
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April 24, 1936

Mr. VENIOT:

Can the minister tell when the distinction was first made between district superintendent and district director?

Topic:   POST OFFICE
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April 24, 1936

Mr. VENIOT:

May I be permitted to

say a word in connection with the trans-Canada air mail service? When I had the honour of being Postmaster General in a

Supply-Post Office

former government I do not think I am claiming too much credit when I say I attempted to inaugurate that service. We had a survey made from Halifax to Vancouver, and we did start a tentative trans-Canada air mail service. At that time the Halifax to Montreal section did not pay. It became a question of educating the people, particularly the business men, of the maritime provinces, and I regret to say that the Post Office Department did not get the enthusiastic support it should have received from the business sections of the maritime provinces for the transportation of mail from Halifax to Montreal by way of Moncton, Saint John and Quebec city. We kept it up for a year and a half in the hope that we might receive that encouragement that we felt was due us, but finally that section was abandoned. Then we attempted to organize the section from Montreal to Winnipeg, by way of Sturgeon Falls, by rail at night and by airplane to Winnipeg for distribution the next afternoon about one o'clock. We also had investigations made in order to try to find the most feasible route through the mountains. If I mistake not, in connection with the trans-Canada air service from Halifax to Vancouver, if we could have secured an average load of six hundred pounds from Halifax through to Vancouver at the rate then in existence, five cents per letter-

Topic:   POST OFFICE
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April 24, 1936

Mr. VENIOT:

The postal service in Canada, both air mail and ordinary mail, is second to none in the world. In 1928 we had a request from France to allow one of our officials to go over there and explain to them the system we were carrying on, so that they could amend theirs to meet existing conditions. They accepted our way of doing things. In 1929

[Mr. Veniot.l

the assistant Postmaster General at Washington came here to consult with one of the officials who is now sitting in front of me as to the best method of carrying on air mail delivery in the United States. They changed their system, under which they had suffered enormous deficits every year, and adopted the Canadian system.

May I say a word on behalf of those with whom I worked at the time I held the office of Postmaster General, and may I pay due credit to those men who under all governments in years gone by have given and even at the present time are giving their attention to the perfection of the postal service in Canada, and have brought it to its present state of development. It stands second to none in the world.

Topic:   POST OFFICE
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