Celina CAESAR-CHAVANNES

CAESAR-CHAVANNES, Celina

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Whitby (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 24, 1974
Website
http://www.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/ProfileMP.aspx?Key=214658&Language=E
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b078667f-922f-4979-a4c6-311e7bdc4068&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
Celina.Caesar-Chavannes@parl.gc.ca
Profession
entrepreneur, lecturer, research consultant

Parliamentary Career

October 19, 2015 -
LIB
  Whitby (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (December 2, 2015 - )

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 67)


June 20, 2019

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Ind.)

, seconded by the member for Vancouver Granville, moved for leave to introduce Bill C-468, An Act to amend the Employment Equity Act.

She said: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great honour to present this bill in what will be my last act as a member of Parliament.

I would first like to offer my condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Mark Warawa, and the community of Langley—Aldergrove. His last speech in this place will be remembered as one of my favourites.

I want to thank the member for Vancouver Granville, a woman I am very proud of and will always continue to stand with.

I want to thank the members of the Liberal government and the NDP for supporting this bill from the outset, and particularly the members for Portage—Lisgar and Oshawa who helped and guided me through this process to get this bill here today. I want to thank Jacqueline Yost, legislative counsel; and the Office of the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel for all of their help in getting me here.

I came to this place to be a voice for all the people I represent, to raise awareness on issues, to move the status quo and to remove barriers.

This bill represents the voices of those both past and present in the federal system. It is my hope that it will examine and help remove the barriers that prevent them, especially those from the black community, from achieving success and promotion within the system. Their voices are reflected in this bill, and it is my honour to bring their voices to this place.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Employment Equity Act
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June 18, 2019

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes

Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply and will be voting yes.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Main Estimates, 2019-20
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June 18, 2019

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes

Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply and will be voting yes.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Main Estimates, 2019-20
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June 18, 2019

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes

Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply and will vote yes.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Main Estimates, 2019-20
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June 6, 2019

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order, which might be my final act here as a member of Parliament. There have been discussions among the parties, and I want to thank them for those discussions, and if you seek it, I believe you will find unanimous consent for the following motion: Whereas black communities in Canada have been established for over 400 years; whereas Canada is a signatory to the UN initiatives for the International Decade for People of African Descent; whereas the UN working group of experts on people of African descent has noted the disproportionately high unemployment rates among black Canadians, many of whom are forced to take low-paying jobs with little security and poor prospects, and has, accordingly, recommended that Canada should systematically address employment disparity for African Canadians through enactment of employment equity legislation; whereas in 20 years, the black population has doubled in size, going from 573,860 persons in 1996 to 1,198,540 persons in 2016; whereas the very first employment equity program in the federal government for black employees was in Halifax in 1973, and in 150 years of the establishment of Canada, a black person has never been appointed to or promoted to deputy minister in the federal government; whereas employment equity cannot explain the thinning out of visible minorities, particularly black employees, that happens at the assistant deputy minister and deputy minister levels; whereas employment equity cannot explain the virtual absence of black women within the executive cadre, considering over the past 30 years, women in general have come to represent approximately 50% of the population of executives in the federal public service; whereas we need to disaggregate employment equity data to understand the lived experience of black employees; and whereas there have been more than enough qualified, meritorious candidates from the black community in Canada to fill these roles; therefore this House: (1) will examine the systemic barriers which prevent members from black communities from being promoted within the federal system; (2) will review the definition of visible minority with a view to updating this language and concept in ways that are consistent with best and promising practices for effectively addressing racial inequality in Canada's federal labour market; (3) will engage in a process to understand the work lived experience of federal black public servants; (4) will consider using disaggregated data for the next iteration of the employment equity report; (5) will consider the establishment of a commissioner of employment equity; and, lastly, (6) will consider the use of equity and anti-racism training within an anti-oppression framework for all federal employees.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of the House
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