Jean Louis BARIBEAU

BARIBEAU, Jean Louis

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Champlain (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 19, 1893
Deceased Date
December 26, 1975
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Louis_Baribeau
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b057da33-0923-4c8c-9c52-27d13114ed82&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Champlain (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 9 of 10)


April 19, 1932

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

Our farmers have heavy burdens to bear, and if the former government succeeded in reducing the national debt as stated by the hon. member for Sherbrooke (Mr. Howard), it was perhaps, at the expense of our farming classes, for we note that the farmers are those who suffer the most in the present crisis, that their properties are mortgaged, that they have had to resort to promissory notes and contracted obligations which date back to the former regime.

The Budget-Mr. Baribeau

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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April 19, 1932

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

The farmers realized this situation and proved it eloquently on July 28, 1930. Do they now regret having acted so energetically against their oppressors? They certainly do not regret the New Zealand treaty, nor the generosities of the former government towards the United States, nor the former tariff which afforded very little protection and was the ca-use of their distress. Now, under the impulse of the new policy, equilibrium will be restored, thus dissipating the nerve wrecking nightmares of a year of depression. I made the suggestion, a few moments ago, to those who will represent us at the Imperial conference which is being held in Ottawa-a great honour for Canada- to do everything possible in order to obtain a preference on newsprint and pulp so as to help our working Classes. I shall further add that such a preference would tend besides to aid numerous farmers, for most of them are owners of woodlots, and the sale of their wood would allow them to realize appreciable profits. We must protect our industries, and farming, being the main industry of this country, deserves the greatest protection.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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April 19, 1932

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

I proceed.

Topic:   $123,070 41761-136J
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April 19, 1932

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

There is another class of people to which I want to draw the attention of the house, the navigators many of whom reside in my county. We have a number of associations of navigators, among these a branch of the National Association of Marine Engineers of Canada, also numerous pilot associations. May I therefore make a few suggestions to the hon. Minister of Marine (Mr. Duranileau) who, I feel certain, will lend a kind ear to my remarks. I think the government should interest itself especially in the young men who wish to become pilots. No government, up to now, have taken -any interest in these young men and yet this profession is a necessary one, even indispensable. These apprentices are destined to replace the pilots as the latter disappear. Most of them are obliged to make great sacrifices to become pilots. A large number belong to families that are poor, as those who have means are not attracted to the hardy life of a sailor which they must undergo to reach their goal. These apprentices find it practically impossible to earn anything in other trades.

They are, on the contrary, obliged to make an outlay of almost $200, each season to complete their apprenticeship. Generally their parents are not in a position to help them, so that you can easily realize their sad lot. According to regulations laid down, these young men have to undergo an apprenticeship of 5 or 6 years before obtaining their officer's certificate. This consists in travelling on ships to and fro between Quebec and Father Point, and between Quebec and Montreal. They must have to their credit at least 50 trips during each season. They are therefore kept busy during the whole season. During that time they receive no salary; on the contrary they must pay their board and travelling expenses, except when on service on the ships. When the trips stipulated by the regulations are over, the season of navigation closes, they have not the opportunity of serving on vessels crossing the ocean. They are idle all winter. Those whose families have

certain means are less to be pitied, however, most of them are in straitened circumstances. I think it is the duty of the government and especially that of our worthy Minister of Marine to help these young men. Why should they not be given the preference in working on the government's ice 'breakers in winter? While thus helping these young men, the latter could complete their naval instructions and become familiar with the difficulties of winter navigation. There is a tendency to further prolong the navigation season, this almost makes it necessary for pilots to have a better knowledge of the difficulties of winter navigation. Where is there a more appropriate school for our future pilots than that of passing a few winters on our ice breakers? They would certainly discover hidden difficulties that perhaps they would never find out during the summer months.

Previous to closing my remarks, sir, I must inform the house that I had the honour of being invited to call on His Excellency, the Governor General, Lord Besslborough-

Topic:   $123,070 41761-136J
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March 11, 1932

Mr. J. L. BARIBEAU (Champlain) (Translation) :

Mr. Speaker, there is so much

obstruction, on the part of the opposition, to this measure aiming at amending chapter 58 of the Statutes of Canada, 1931, by striking out the word "March" in clause 8, to replace it by "May", a bill aiming at extending to May the operation of the Unemployment Relief Act, that I deem it my duty to rise and speak in favour of this resolution. I think that those opposing the bill would not feel so much at ease in discussing this measure in their respective constituencies, because the voting of this resolution introduced by the right hon. Prime Minister is anxiously sought 'by all citizens of Canada.

I am speaking on behalf of the great majority of my constituents, which I have the honour to represent, when I request the government to extend the period in which relief will be given to the unemployed. I received within the last days, a telephone message from the mayor of Grand'Mere, asking me to take the necessary steps to get the Act extended. The mayor of Grand'Mere who is highly thought of by his fellow citizens, does not share my political views. I am certain that he does not approve of the numerous speeches delivered by the representatives of his party, on this question.

I also had the occasion, in the course of last week of meeting the mayor of the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine, and on behalf of his fellow citizens he asked me to do my very best to have the government continue the relief of the unemployed in his town.

May I, sir, point out that the towns of Grand'Mere and Cap-de-la-Madeleine are the most important centres in my county.

I also deem it my duty to state in the house that the Unemployment Relief Act has had 'beneficial results in the county of Champlain, a county particularly affected by the depression existing in the pulp and paper industries-a crisis for which no one holds the government responsible.

I shall close my remarks, sir, believing that I have done my duty in supporting a measure which is asked for by all my constituents, without party distinction. They are thankful for what the government has done to relieve the unemployed, who, for the most part, are strangers attracted to this country by the intensive immigration policy of the former regime; and if we find Canadians among these unemployed, it is because foreigners have taken from them the means of earning their living.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE ACT, 1932-CONSIDERATION OP RESOLUTION
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