Robert Abercrombie PRINGLE

PRINGLE, Robert Abercrombie, Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Stormont (Ontario)
Birth Date
December 15, 1855
Deceased Date
January 9, 1922
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Abercrombie_Pringle
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ae857af8-8d19-4f6d-8e3c-ac71e3e1703f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Cornwall and Stormont (Ontario)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Stormont (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 56 of 57)


March 28, 1901

Mr. PRINGLE.

The increase has been practically nothing from 1896, because the manufacturers of this country had no confidence in the administration of the hon. gentlemen. I do not hear of any new manufacturing industries started iu that town since 1896. The hon. member for Vancouver (Mr. Smith) says that the United States have not prospered under a protective tariff. The hon. gentleman (Mr. Smith) said that the protective tariff is injurious to the labourers of any country in which it is enforced ; that it creates strikes, and he cited the United States as an example. But he did not say anything about the strikes in free trade England, and I could point him to the town of Valleyfield and other places in Canada where strikes have occurred during the regime of the present Liberal government. If protection injures the United States and if the labourer is not successful in that country, why should we find that 448,572 immigrants went into the United States in 1900 with the expectation of having their labour rewarded, and we know that the United States never had a higher protective tariff than it had that year. I am glad that the hon. gentleman referred to the United States because there is no country that gives to Canada the object lesson that that country does. Let me glance for just a moment at the commercial history of the United States. We can go back to the report which that great statesman, Alex. Hamilton, made in 1789, in favour of a protective tariff ; we can go back to 1813, after the protective tariff had come into force, and we can see how in that time the manufacturing industries of the United States took root. We find that in 1815 there were 140 cotton manufactures in the vicinity of Rhode Island, operating 130,000 spindles, and that many places such as Pittsburg sprang into existence as manufacturing centres. Five years after the protective tariff had been introduced into the United States the number of cotton spindles in operation was estimated at 500,000, employing 100,000 men, having a capital of $40,000,000 and paying about $15,000.000 in wages. That was the inception of protection there. We find that every time a party opposed to protection has been elected in the United States that country has gone backward ; business has become

[DOT]2325

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 28, 1901

Mr. PRINGLE.

Well, the hon. gentleman may rest assured that he is not able to drag me into a controversy on the race and creed cry. I think, Mr. Speaker, among the greatest questions of legislation, there is probably not one which bears more directly on our future welfare than that of the national policy, and the tariff which we adopt in this country. To all theories and all reasonings against protection stands opposed the. unanswerable fact that experience has been always and every where is in its favour. Our government is made for all. We are not asking for any special protection for any one class in this broad Dominion ; we are asking for ample protection to be given to every class, and the class that requires it most is the labouring class. I listened with a great deal of pleasure to the speech delivered the other evening by the hon. member for Bonaventure (Mr. Marcil), and I was a little struck at some of the remarks that he made. One of his remarks especially attracted my attention, in which he said that Sir John A. Macdonald, for^ the purpose of obtaining power, did not hesitate to introduce a tariff which was anti-British. Sir John A. Macdonald gave fifty years of his life towards building up the empire of which we form so important a part. You never heard Sir John A. Macdonald ad-

vocating unrestricted reciprocity, or commercial union ; but you did bear bim, in that manifesto which be published just prior to that election, use these words :

As for myself, my course is clear. A British subject I was born, a British subject I will die. With my utmost efforts, with my latest breath, will I oppose the veiled treason which attempts by sordid means and mercenary proffers to allure our people from their allegiance.

The people of Canada responded to that appeal, and they buried for all time to come that policy which was so strongly advocated by the Minister of Marine and Fisheries and by other ministers who sit before me to-night ; and we did not hear any more of commercial union or unrestricted reciprocity.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 28, 1901

Mr. PIUNGLE.

I am not accustomed to pay much attention to all these telegraphic *despatches that we find in promiscuous newspapers. Now, the hon. memebr for Bonaventure says that this tariff is nothing more than a repetition of the old policy. But I will do him the credit to say that he stands up in this House and says that he is in favour of protection. He is on record in the ' Hansard ' as saying that he is in favour of moderate protection. But he goes on to say that this country has made no progress during the regime of the late Conservative administration, that it remains stationary.

I would like to take him down to that little factory town of Cornwall, where, in 1881, we had a population of 4,408, and, according to the census of 1891, we had a population of 0,805, an increase of 2,337 in ten years, or about 52 per cent. I want to tell him that from 1891 to 1896 our popu-; lation increased until, counting the town : and the suburbs, built up largely by the manufacturing industries established under the national policy, we have a population now of between 9.000 and 10,000. Without1 going into a number of items that I could mentiou, showing the great prosperity of the country between 1878 and 1890, I will only take the deposits in the savings banks. In 1877 there were 24,074 depositors, and the amount deposited was $2,639,937 : in 1890 the number had increased to 126,442

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 28, 1901

Mr. PRINGLE.

All right.

Mr. MARCIL (Bonaventure) I want to ask the hon. gentleman if he has taken cognizance of the cablegram which is published in this evening's papers containing a declaration from the Chancellor of the Exchequer in England that the policy which is now advocated by the opposition will not he countenanced in England ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 28, 1901

Mr. PRINGLE.

Under the Liberal administration the grass grew in the streets of Cornwall, from 1873 to 1878.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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