Pierre POILIEVRE

POILIEVRE, The Hon. Pierre, P.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Carleton (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 3, 1979
Website
http://pierremp.ca
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ad4032f2-6bb1-497b-b146-f321cfb71ba9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
pierre.poilievre@parl.gc.ca
Profession
businessman, communication consultant, policy analyst

Parliamentary Career

June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (November 7, 2008 - May 24, 2011)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (November 7, 2008 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities and for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (May 25, 2011 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of State (Democratic Reform) (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
  • Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform (February 9, 2015 - November 3, 2015)
October 19, 2015 -
CPC
  Carleton (Ontario)
  • Minister of State (Democratic Reform) (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
  • Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform (February 9, 2015 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 687 of 690)


November 2, 2004

Mr. Pierre Poilievre (Nepean—Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Chair, in my constituency I have a number of citizens who have been afflicted with this terrible tragedy. I have visited them in their homes and they have been to my office. They have come to me to tell me their stories. That is why I felt it so important at this late hour to come to the House of Commons to tell those stories to all members.

I have seen how bright, vibrant lives have been reduced to misery by the government's failure to properly test the blood that was being injected into the veins of Canadian citizens, ultimately poisoning them with an irreversible disease with which they now suffer and from which many have now died.

That is why I find it so enormously frustrating to see the government's failure to compensate all victims of this odious tragedy. The government has failed to compensate those who do not meet a very specific and limited criteria. I reject the reasons that back up that decision.

It is clear that the testing was available before 1986. It is clear that the government should compensate those people who were relying on the government to protect them.

It is more agonizing to learn that the compensation that has been set aside and allotted to the victims outside the years 1986 to 1990 has not actually arrived on their doorstep. That money was meant to provide victims with largely the basic medical necessities that resulted from their illness. Yet we learn that over $100 million has not been passed on to those victims, that it sits in some provincial coffers, that it has been used for general revenues by the provincial government. Indeed, that is outrageous.

I want to know, will the hon. member stand in this House and offer a clear remedy on how he and his party will finally hold the McGuinty provincial government in Ontario accountable for the roughly $130 million that has not been allotted to the victims? The money came from the federal government and was meant for the victims, but was intercepted halfway by the McGuinty regime and has been directed erroneously to general revenues. What will the government do to hold the McGuinty regime accountable for intercepting the funds that were meant to go to the innocent victims of this tragedy?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Assistance to Hepatitis C Victims
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October 26, 2004

Mr. Pierre Poilievre (Nepean—Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to broaden the context of our discussion to the overall matter of the public service and zero in on the comments the hon. member has made with respect to whistleblower legislation because I do not believe these issues can be discussed in isolation.

My understanding of Bill C-11, as it is currently written, is that the disclosure mechanism is not independent from the political leadership of the country. That is an essential problem with the bill. Furthermore, through order in council the cabinet can remove different branches of the government from the power of this legislation. That means that if the sponsorship scandal had occurred and this bill had been in place at that time, and the government had been interested in concealing information, it very easily could have removed any agency that was implicated from protection under the whistleblower legislation, thus removing the protections on public servants who wished to speak out against the corruption.

Those are two essential flaws that I see: the lack of independence and the fact that the cabinet can exempt certain bodies of government.

Due to the fact that we now have a minority government, and that the majority of members in this chamber and in the government operations committee are in the opposition, that is the majority support true whistleblower legislation, does the hon. member believe that we can use this coalition of opposition members to put forward the necessary amendments to strengthen this bill, give it teeth, and give it meaning to our public servants and taxpayers?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Financial Administration Act
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October 26, 2004

Mr. Pierre Poilievre (Nepean—Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Queensway-Carleton, a hospital in my community, is facing a funding crunch as it attempts to serve 400,000 people in our community. Yet, year after year the NCC charges this small community hospital tens of thousands of dollars in rent. There is about to be a massive rent increase which the hospital itself says could cost as many as 40 nurses.

Why does the government simply not resolve this problem by selling the land to the hospital for $1?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Health
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October 21, 2004

Mr. Pierre Poilievre (Nepean—Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, we believe in supporting our softwood lumber industry, but rewarding Liberal friends is no way to do it.

The Prime Minister's deputy chief of staff, Ruth Thorkelson, got a $15,000 contract from the trade department, the same department she was lobbying.

What is more, André Albinati left the trade minister's office to become an Earnscliffe lobbyist. Only a week later, $800,000 followed him to the Prime Minister's favourite lobby firm.

Why are the Prime Minister's cronies making big bucks at the expense of our softwood lumber industry?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Softwood Lumber
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October 19, 2004

Mr. Pierre Poilievre (Nepean—Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member as my neighbour. She represents the constituency directly north of mine and I know her to be a very devoted member of Parliament, committed to her community and to her country.

She remarked on the issue of health care today. I would like to ask her a question that is of particular concern to our respective communities. When she remarked on health care, it turned my attention to a hospital that is in her constituency but services all of the western part of my constituency. It is called the Queensway-Carleton Hospital.

I have met with the hospital board members in the past and they have explained to me their concerns. They are continually obliged to pay lease payments to a federal organization called the National Capital Commission. The fact that the National Capital Commission owns the land on which that hospital operates is a hindrance, an encumbrance, to the hospital's plans to expand, provide new services and possibly sublease to family doctors and other medical practitioners.

As a result, I have met with the head of the NCC to discuss the idea of transferring that land over to our community hospital. I have put forward a motion, Motion No. 135, which would accomplish just that. For the price of a dollar, the NCC would sell the property directly to the hospital, in the same way that two other hospitals in the Ottawa area have received their property from the City of Ottawa.

Given her government's professed commitment to health care, I am wondering whether she believes that the Liberal government will support this motion. Does she believe that the Liberal government will call upon the NCC, through the Treasury Board, to sell the land to our community hospital so that every dollar the hospital has at its disposal can be used for patient care and every square foot of property on which the hospital operates can be developed to expand the services that are available to our respective communities?

Topic:   Speech From The Throne
Subtopic:   Resumption of Debate on Address in Reply
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