Pierre POILIEVRE

POILIEVRE, The Hon. Pierre, P.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Carleton (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 3, 1979
Website
http://pierremp.ca
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ad4032f2-6bb1-497b-b146-f321cfb71ba9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
pierre.poilievre@parl.gc.ca
Profession
businessman, communication consultant, policy analyst

Parliamentary Career

June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (November 7, 2008 - May 24, 2011)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Nepean--Carleton (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (November 7, 2008 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities and for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (May 25, 2011 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of State (Democratic Reform) (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
  • Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform (February 9, 2015 - November 3, 2015)
October 19, 2015 -
CPC
  Carleton (Ontario)
  • Minister of State (Democratic Reform) (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
  • Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform (February 9, 2015 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 690)


June 18, 2019

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, two years ago, almost to the day, the finance minister unleashed an attack on small businesses. He tried to raise taxes on their investment up to 73% and double the tax on parents selling their businesses to their children. He backed down, partially and temporarily, after a massive uprising.

I have two questions. First, will he admit that this attack on small businesses was wrong? Second, will he promise never to try it again?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Small Business
Full View Permalink

June 18, 2019

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Cariboo—Prince George, and what a debate it will be. After all, the cat is out of the bag.

Earlier today, I asked the finance minister if he would rule out bringing back his small business tax increases. Members will remember them, the ones he ruled out in the summer of 2017, after the Prime Minister had said that small businesses are typically just wealthy tax cheats. The minister went out and tried to impose tax increases that would cost 73% on the dollar for every small business investment, and then he increased taxes on income and work shared among members of a family business.

We remember when the Liberals tried to double the tax paid when a parent sells a business to a child. We remember when they put forward a proposal that would allow foreign multinationals to pay half the tax if they bought a Canadian family business, and then the kids of that family business would pay. We remember how our farmers feared that this would mean that within a generation we would have nothing but foreign-owned farms where farm kids would be turned into tenants to foreign landlords on their own ancestral lands. That was the shock and dismay that Canadian entrepreneurs felt when the finance minister struck out and attacked them in the summer of 2017.

Then Canadians fought back. Local chambers of commerce, shopkeepers, pizza shop owners, plumbers, farmers, people who had never met all locked arms and said that was enough. For far too long, the government had been picking their pockets and they just quietly went on their way, showing the typical Canadian culture of deference.

However, when this tax increase struck, it went too far, and entrepreneurs decided that they were going to unite and defeat these tax changes. They were only partially successful. The minister then agreed to put some of the most egregious parts of his original proposal on hold. There was a great sigh of relief, but I think people were under a misconception that the government had backed down. In fact, headlines screamed out that the finance minister had backed down from small business tax changes.

The truth is that he never backed down. He simply put those changes on hold, leaving open the possibility that they might one day come back. He never once admitted that the proposals were flawed or wrong. He simply said they were politically impossible so close to an election. He made the pragmatic calculation to put them on hold. On hold until when, one might ask. The answer is quite simple: until after the election, when the Liberals no longer need voters but still need their money.

Of course, the Liberals are running out of other people's money. The deficit is $20 billion. The budget has not balanced itself. In fact, the deficit is growing year after year, and the government needs a way to pay for its insatiable spending habit. What Liberals hope now is that Canadians will not ask them how they will pay for it until after the election is over, when voters cannot do anything about it because it will be four more years until the subsequent election—

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of Supply
Full View Permalink

June 18, 2019

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I have just given two opportunities for the minister to admit that his original attack on small business people in the summer of 2017 was wrong and that he would never try it again. We know he is running out of other people's money and he will be looking for more of it if he is re-elected.

Now we find out that he is open to reintroducing his 73% tax on small business investment and he is open to doubling the tax on families selling from parent to child.

Why does he not just admit that is exactly what he will do if re-elected?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Small Business
Full View Permalink

June 18, 2019

Hon. Pierre Poilievre

One more sleep, Mr. Speaker, and we will have a plan that lowers emissions and taxes, just like we did last time, unlike the Liberal government, which has raised emissions and taxes.

Let us go through the tax policy issues for small businesses that he mentioned. One is the small business tax rate. The previous Conservative government reduced the small business tax rate from 13% down to 11% and then 11% down to 9%. One of the first things the Liberal finance minister did is raise it back to 11% from 9%. Then, in the midst of a tax revolt, while he and the Prime Minister were running away with their tails between their legs in full retreat, they reinstated the tax increase that they had repealed when they first took office. That is the reality of the small business tax reduction.

As for the carbon tax, there is no rebate for small businesses. They bear the full brunt of the extra heating, transportation, cooling and other energy costs that they must bear. Only those businesses that can pump 50,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases through their chimneys are able to get an exemption from the carbon tax, but normal mom-and-pop shops, small construction companies and pizza shops pay the full tax, with no rebate and no support whatsoever. That is not a climate plan; it is a tax plan.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of Supply
Full View Permalink

June 18, 2019

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, we just heard it right there. Small businesses across the land will notice that the minister had an opportunity to rule out bringing back his original tax increases that he proposed in the summer of 2017 and he refused to rule it out.

We know what is coming after the election, just like the carbon tax. We have found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the government will raise gas prices 23¢ a litre.

Why does the government not honestly admit that now, before the election?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Small Business
Full View Permalink