François Jean PELLETIER

PELLETIER, François Jean

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Matane (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 17, 1863
Deceased Date
December 15, 1945
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/François_Jean_Pelletier
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=aca426bd-b944-4cc7-ae80-cbd038c1a9dc&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Matane (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Matane (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 27 of 27)


April 29, 1918

Mr. PELLETIER:

How will this legislation operate in rural districts where a farmer is doming into a oity or town or village with four or five or six dozen eggs, or ten or fifteen pounds of butter?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INSPECTION AND SALE ACT AMENDMENT.
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April 29, 1918

Mr. PELLETIER:

Suppose he were to ship it, what is the result? He would take the responsibility of marking the container.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INSPECTION AND SALE ACT AMENDMENT.
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April 16, 1918

Mr. PELLETIER:

That is the article which is the most mysteriously prepared, I believe.

Topic:   MEAT AND CANNED FOODS ACT AMEND MENT.
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April 16, 1918

Mr. PELLETIER:

As a rule, to begin with, they take from fifteen to twenty per cent of pork fat, and then from twenty-five to thirty per cent of beef scraps, or bits of whatever they can find, trimmings as we probably term it; and then about twenty per cent of Victoria or potato flour; and the balance is water. You have about thirty per cent of water in your sausages, and twenty per cent of potato or Victoria flour. When a consumer gets sausage, he pays for the potato flour, the water, the scraps of beef, etc. But when he comes to put the sausage in the frying pan it almost walks out; it won't stay there until the water is all out of it. For these, reasons, and there are a great many others that have been given by other hon. gentlemen, I believe that we ought to have a very thorough inspection of meats at all times, and I hope that the Minister of Agriculture will do his best and finish the good work that he has started along this line.

Topic:   MEAT AND CANNED FOODS ACT AMEND MENT.
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April 16, 1918

Mr. PELLETIER:

Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to see that the Minister of Agriculture is taking steps to have a more thorough inspection of meats, food and food products. An hon. gentleman stated a few moments ago that some of these goods were mysteriously prepared, and I sincerely believe that he is right. I shall endeavour, if I may be permitted, to give a brief explanation of this matter. But before doing so, I would like to ask the minister if it is the intention to have qualified veterinary surgeons act as inspectors of live stock, or if anyone else may be appointed to such positions? I may say that while I was in the legislature of the state of Montana, in 1901, I was the father of a similar Bill providing for the appointment of inspectors of meats and food, and the Bill provided that up to the time that the cattle went on the killing floor the inspection was to be made by a veterinary surgeon, and no one else. For the inspection of mbats in the refrigerators, or in the markets, it provided that a man well versed in meats was to be appointed, one knowing all the stages from the time the animal is killed until the meat is sold to the consumer.

Now, coming to the preparation of ham, one of the reasons why that should be well inspected is simply because the packers are taking advantage of all the opportunities which are given them, and even -if the opportunity is not. given to them they take it. Take, for instance, to begin with, the brine, which is composed, of course, of water, salt, brown sugar and preservaline; and we all know that preservaline contains acid. Preservaline is put in in order to preserve the meat a longer time. When it comes to the smoking process, instead of smoking it twenty, thirty or forty days, the length of time required to smoke a good ham, it is simply put in a receptacle of some kind with colorine in it. This colorine contains acid also. These things are not very good for the stomach, still the consumer has to take the product. Now, the reason why these things are done is because the ham requires but very little smoking if it is coloured, and it has a very transparent colour, a very nice colour indeed. If it was smoked thoroughly, the ham would drip, that is, the brine in it would drip off. and it would lose weight.

Hence the necessity for the packer not to smoke it in order to retain the weight. The same process is used in regard to breakfast bacon. I may say a word or two about sausages.

Topic:   MEAT AND CANNED FOODS ACT AMEND MENT.
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