Walter Edward FOSTER

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 252)


June 12, 1950

Sir George Foster:

I move, seconded by Mr. Carvell:

"That the orders in council, copies of which were laid on the table of the house on the 2nd of April, be concurred in."

Topic:   THE REGULATIONS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR UNIFORM SYSTEM OF PUBLISHING REGULATIONS AND LAYING THEM BEFORE PARLIAMENT
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June 12, 1950

Sir George Foster moved

that the orders in council laid on the table of the house on the 2nd April, 1918, be concurred in. He said: The orders in council which have been issued and laid on the table form a long list of two pages. They are formal to a certain extent, but the law requires that these orders in council when passed shall be laid on the table of the house within a certain time.

That is the situation at the present time. Orders in council have to be laid on the table of the house generally fifteen days after they are passed, or if parliament be not then sitting, within fifteen days of the commencement of the next session. Then Sir George Foster continued:

I think they are not law until they are so laid on the table of the house, and thereafter if approved by the house.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier replied:

These orders in council, as I understand the law, have to be submitted to the house and ratified by the house.

Topic:   THE REGULATIONS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR UNIFORM SYSTEM OF PUBLISHING REGULATIONS AND LAYING THEM BEFORE PARLIAMENT
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June 12, 1950

Sir George Foster:

Yes.

Topic:   THE REGULATIONS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR UNIFORM SYSTEM OF PUBLISHING REGULATIONS AND LAYING THEM BEFORE PARLIAMENT
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January 25, 1940

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Administrator this day in the Senate chamber, his excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes, I have obtained a copy, which is as follows: Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

You have been summoned to the first session of a new parliament at a time of the greatest conflict in the history of mankind. Upon the outcome of the struggle will depend the maintenance of civilized society and the inheritance of human freedom for our own and future generations.

Since parliament last met, the nature of the conflict, the character of the enemy, and the perils w'hich menace all free nations, have become only too clear. In that short space of time, the world has seen the peaceful and peace-loving peoples of Denmark, Norway, Holland, Belgium, and Luxembourg made the victims of the treachery and barbarism which have marked the successive outrages of nazi Germany. It has also witnessed the invasion of Finland, and, despite the epic resistance of its heroic population, the partition of that unoffending country. At any time, the lust of conquest may vastly enlarge the theatre of war. These tragic events have but served to intensify our determination to share in the war effort of the allied powers to the utmost of our strength. In this resolution the government has been fortified by tire direct and unquestioned mandate of the Canadian people.

The organization and prosecution of Canada's war effort have commanded the unremitting attention of my ministers. The constant consultation and complete cooperation maintained with the governments of the United Kingdom and France have been materially strengthened by the recent visit to those countries of my Minister of National Defence.

You will be fully informed of Canada's action both in the military and economic fields. You will be asked to consider measures deemed essential for the prosecution of the war, and for the social and economic requirements of the country.

While the present session of parliament will necessarily be mainly concerned with Canada's war effort, and the measures essential to the achievement of ultimate victory, my ministers are of opinion that, despite what to-day is being witnessed of concentrated warfare, it is desirable, as far as may be possible, to plan for the days that will follow the cessation of hostilities.

As a contribution to industrial stability in time of war, and to social security and justice in time of peace, resolutions will be introduced for an amendment to the British North America Act which would empower the parliament of Canada to enact at the present session legislation to establish unemployment insurance on a national scale.

The report of the Royal Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations, which has just been received, will be tabled immediately.

Internal Economy Commission

Members of tlie House of Commons:

YTou will be asked to make financial provision for expenditure necessitated by the existing state of war.

The estimates for the current fiscal year will be submitted to you without delay.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

Since the last session of parliament, a much beloved Governor General has passed from our midst. In the death of Lord Tweedsmuir, Canada mourns one whose character and achievements had endeared him to our people; the British commonwealth has lost a wise and understanding counsellor, and the fellowship of writers a gifted interpreter of the graces and humanities of English literature. I join with you in the expression to Lady Tweedsmuir and the members of her family of the deep sympathy of the Canadian people.

His Majesty the King has been pleased to appoint the Earl of Athlone as His Representative in succession to the late Lord Tweeds-muir. The sense of duty and the public services which have distinguished the lives of the Governor General designate and the Princess Alice ensure for His Excellency and Her Royal Highness an eager and cordial welcome to Canada.

As you assume, in these dark and difficult days, the grave responsibilities with which you have been entrusted by the Canadian people, may your resolution be sustained by the knowledge that it is the liberties of all free peoples that you are helping to preserve. Unless the evil powers, which threaten the very existence of freedom, are vanquished, the world itself will inevitably be reduced to a state of international anarchy.

I pray that Divine Providence may guide and bless your deliberations.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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January 25, 1940

Mr. SPEAKER:

I will have it read by the clerk assistant.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

During the months which have elapsed since the close of the special session, my ministers have given unremitting attention to the organization and prosecution of Canada's war effort. The government has been in constant consultation with the government of the United Kingdom, and the measures adopted have been those which it is believed will best serve the common cause.

Vigorous action has been taken through all branches of the armed forces to provide for the security and defence of Canada, and for cooperation with the allied forces on land, on sea and in the air.

For the effective prosecution of the war, Canada's industrial, financial and other resources are being steadily mobilized and all war activities coordinated. The production and marketing of agricultural and other primary products have been given constructive direction; and safeguards have been provided against undue enhancement, under war conditions, of the prices of food, fuel and other necessaries of life.

Since last you met the developments of the war have made increasingly clear the nature of the struggle in which we are engaged. The very existence of nations that cherish independence and democratic ideals is menaced by enemy forces of ruthless aggression which aim to dominate mankind by terror and violence. The Canadian people have shown their determination to share with Britain and France to the utmost of their strength in the defence of freedom.

My ministers are of the opinion that the effective prosecution of the war makes it imperative that those who are charged with the grave responsibility of carrying on the government of Canada should, in this critical period, be fortified by a direct and unquestioned mandate from the people. My advisers, accordingly, having regard to existing conditions and the stage of the life of the present parliament, have decided upon an immediate appeal to the country.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

In all that pertains to the discharge of your responsible duties, may Divine Providence be your strength and guide.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
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