Alexander Duncan MCRAE

MCRAE, The Hon. Alexander Duncan

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Vancouver North (British Columbia)
Birth Date
November 17, 1874
Deceased Date
June 26, 1946
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Duncan_McRae
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=abb9e2c0-4713-401f-b0df-22b77db37572&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Vancouver North (British Columbia)
September 4, 1931 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Vancouver North (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 6 of 23)


June 13, 1929

Mr. McRAE:

I would ask the Prime

Minister if the committee in approving this vote may consider that the precedent so established will be the policy of the government with respect to future cases of this kind.

Mr. MACKENZIE KING': Each case, I think, has always to be considered on its merits. If another case presented itself in which the circumstances were as distressing as these are, I have no doubt the house would take the same view'.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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June 13, 1929

Mr. McRAE:

I do not think that quite answers my question. There is a principle involved here. I quite agree with what the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre said a few moments ago with respect to this case. Many hardships, many injustices, many unkindnesses are suffered by people under circumstances very similar to those surrounding this case. When considering such a case as this where the husband has left what might be considered a comfortable fortune to his family and has deprived his wife of any participation in it, it is only fair that we should also take into consideration many of the smaller claims as outlined by members on this side of the house. It is only right that an equal measure of justice should be accorded to these minor claims that have even more merit than the one in question.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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June 13, 1929

Mr. McRAE:

I wish to make it perfectly clear that my sympathy is entirely with the biological board, but I want to make it equally clear to the committee that it is the unanimous opinion of those interested in the industry in British Columbia that the board lacks practical direction. That is not the fault of the board so much as it is of the de-parment. There is an increase of 74 per cent in the vote this year over last year, and I submit that in view of the discussion on fisheries which has taken place in this house in the past week, the minister might very well forego this supplementary vote entirely. The list he has read is for more or less permanent improvements. I think the committee would feel better if we got along without any supplementary vote for this purpose, and next year, as the minister has said, he will be able to come here with the matter better in hand, and the committee will understand better what work is being done and the

Supply-Marine and Fisheries

manner in which it is being carried on. I think the idea that the department should expect people to carry on with those investigators unpaid is rather unreasonable. It is hardly to be expected that men will give the necessary time for these long investigations without compensation. I suggest this to the minister for his consideration. I do think, however, that we have voted enough money for this department this year, and that the minister should not ask -the committee to approve $10,000 more by way of supple-mentaries.

Topic:   MARINE AND FISHERIES
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June 13, 1929

Mr. McRAE:

Might I suggest to the minister that he represent to the commission the fact that our halibut fisheries are not making the progress in reestablishment which we might reasonably expect. I am told that overfishing is still being carried on in the Hecate strait.

Topic:   MARINE AND FISHERIES
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June 13, 1929

Mr. McRAE:

Although the discolouration

of halibut has been known for some time by the men in the trade who handle halibut in a large way, I notice the biological board take a good deal of credit to themselves for their discovery. The discolouration comes about while the fish are in the hold of the vessel. What we need is some means of preventing this discolouration. The biological board should bend their efforts to a practical solution of the problem.

Progress reported.

Topic:   MARINE AND FISHERIES
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