George Alexander DREW

DREW, The Hon. George Alexander, P.C., C.C., Q.C.

Parliamentary Career

December 20, 1948 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Carleton (Ontario)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (October 2, 1948 - November 1, 1954)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Carleton (Ontario)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (October 2, 1948 - November 1, 1954)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Carleton (Ontario)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (October 2, 1948 - November 1, 1954)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (February 1, 1955 - August 1, 1956)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1428 of 1429)


January 26, 1949

Mr. Drew:

If I am wrong, I shall be happy to be corrected.

Topic:   CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP
Subtopic:   RETIREMENT OF MR. BRACKEN AS LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION-WELCOME TO NEW MEMBERS THE LATE LUCIEN DUBOIS
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January 26, 1949

Mr. Drew:

I should like to continue what I was pointing out. The practice I have suggested is the accepted practice and Hansard will show clearly that the right hon. member for Glengarry (Mr. Mackenzie King) on the last occasion, when he as Prime Minister presented a motion of a similar character, presented the motion that has always been presented to deal with the speech from the throne and give it precedence. On the very occasion when he did that he indicated that he would be introducing another motion which would have the effect of postponing the debate on a certain day. Therefore there is no inconsistency in presenting the usual

Business of the House

motion to give precedence to the debate, and to give on Friday, as the Prime Minister now has, notice of a motion, to be debated then, which, if carried by the house, would have the effect of postponing the debate.

This motion is not in the form in which a motion for debate on the speech from the throne has been put forward traditionally in this house. My understanding of the rule is that such a motion requires unanimous consent, or forty-eight hours' notice. I indicate to you, Mr. Speaker, that I do not consent to proceeding with this motion in its present form. I want to make quite sure that no suggestion can be made that we are blocking the debate on the speech from the throne. Therefore, if the Prime Minister will now introduce the motion that has been used regularly since confederation, we will support it and give unanimous consent.

Topic:   INTO CONFEDERATION
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January 26, 1949

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, in rising for the first time as a member of this house, may I pick up the

[Mr. St.Laurent.l

remarks of the right hon. the Prime Minister where he left off and join in the expression of regret at the untimely death of Mr. Dubois. One of the members of our party, the hon. member for Stanstead (Mr. Hackett), who knew him personally, will make some remarks in regard to him. I can only say, from the conversations I have had with those who knew him well, that he was highly regarded by all the members of the house, and that we share in the deep feeling of regret at his untimely loss.

I wish sincerely to congratulate the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) on his assumption of the high and responsible office to which he has been called. In the conduct of the affairs of government during the time that he has that responsibility I extend to him my best v/ishes for his good health and for the strength to carry on the arduous duties which fall to his lot. I wish also to thank him for the remarks he made about my own entry into this house. This is, of course, a different arena to that in which I have been for some time past. I thank the Prime Minister for his advice as to the duties of a leader of the opposition. There is one thing, however, that perhaps might be borne in mind, namely, that the rules of the provincial legislature and those of the House of Commons are quite similar, and that I had some years' experience as leader of the opposition in the Ontario legislature. Perhaps because of that fact, together with the fact that I saw changes take place, I have not the same feeling of permanence that may occupy the minds of some people. However, I know that the general summary of the responsibilities of the leader of the opposition was well put forward, in spite of the fact that the Prime Minister had not had the opportunity of sharing my experience. I hope that I shall be able to conduct myself in this office along the lines that have been suggested.

I wish to join in the felicitations which have been extended to the new members who have entered this house today, as I have. I wish to join in the remarks that have been made about the right hon. member for Glengarry (Mr. King) in regard to his return to good health. I know that I share with everyone here the feeling of satisfaction at seeing him present and in good health today, and I hope that condition continues. To each of the new members who have assumed their responsibilities, some of them almost as recently as I myself, I can only say that 1 wish them well in the tasks they have undertaken. In the conduct of the affairs of parliament under our system, it will be my duty to co-operate on such occasions as co-operation is indicated, and, on those occasions on which it is not

indicated, to put forward before the house the point of view which would seem to me to advance the best interests of the country.

Naturally I wish to express particular pleasure at the entry into the house today of the hon. member for Digby-Annapolis-Kings (Mr. Nowlan). He is a great addition to the House of Commons. The marked confidence displayed by those who know him well in his constituency where the vote was taken was a great personal tribute, a recognition of his abilities, and I think it sufficiently indicates what may be expected of him here in the House of Commons.

Before I close these brief remarks may I say that I wish to pay great tribute to my friend the hon. member for Neepawa (Mr. Bracken) and to express the satisfaction I feel in the knowledge that he will be sitting here beside me in the house so that I may have the advantage not only of his friendship and advice but of his long years of training which have been referred to by the Prime Minister in his opening remarks. Mr. Bracken served his province extremely well for the longest period that any premier has occupied that office in any province of Canada.

Topic:   CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP
Subtopic:   RETIREMENT OF MR. BRACKEN AS LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION-WELCOME TO NEW MEMBERS THE LATE LUCIEN DUBOIS
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January 26, 1949

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, as this motion is not in

the usual form, I think it would be very helpful to hon. members if the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) would explain the effect of the motion, and what he suggests should be done tomorrow under that motion.

Topic:   INTO CONFEDERATION
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January 26, 1949

Mr. Drew:

I have asked the Prime Minister to reconsider this, but since he has not done so I would point out that this motion does not produce the effect which he has indicated to the house. He says that this would have the effect of carrying on the debate; that unless there was another motion we would go on with the debate.

Topic:   INTO CONFEDERATION
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