Thomas Alfred THOMPSON

THOMPSON, Thomas Alfred

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Lanark (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 5, 1868
Deceased Date
May 12, 1953
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Alfred_Thompson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=aa6d068b-338a-49cc-a128-e8b6da7f61b7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Lanark (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Lanark (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 53)


May 17, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

This $750,000 is

evidently to take care of the bonus on cheese and improvements to cheese factories. How much is estimated for the bonus on cheese, and how much for improvements to factories?

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   PERCENTAGE DEDUCTION FROM GRAINS MARKETED IN SPRING WHEAT AREA-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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May 17, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

We hear a great deal about New Zealand crowding Canada out of the British market in dairy products, but there is no foundation for that statement. Canada has in fact receded from that market herself, and New Zealand has gone in and taken possession of it. Our great difficulty again has been quantity, the lack of a continuity of supply to the British market, and as we receded from that market New Zealand came in and took it from us. Our cheese, for instance, is still selling at a premium in the British market. I think both this government and perhaps the provincial governments have been paying too much attention to the selling end of cheese, in particular. It is right and proper that attention should be paid to the selling end, but the advantage that the dairyman in Canada reaps is not from the selling end but from the production

Supply-Agriculture

end. We have individual cows in Canada producing 20,000 or 25,000 pounds of milk a year, and we have individual herds averaging 10,000 to 12,000 pounds production per year per cow; yet the average cow in Canada produces only 4,000 pounds of milk a year. It is to the breeding and feeding and production ends that governmental activity should be directed, because, with all the money that has been spent so far, the various governments have not been able to influence the market to the extent of half a cent or even one-eighth of a cent a pound. There is room to double the average production of milk in this country, to raise it from 4,000 pounds to 8,000 pounds per cow, and that would be less than the average of many herds, indeed much less. I do not say that all our farmers can have these high-producing herds, but there is far too much spread to-day between the actual and the possible, and that is where government efforts should be exerted.

The government did in the past-I do not see any this year-give grants to our cheese producing associations, and the Ontario government has permitted them to collect five cents a hundred. Last year something around $40,000 were collected, but activities were directed solely towards the selling end of cheese. I think that is a great mistake. The future prosperity of the dairymen of this country lies in the production end, and more attention should be given to production by the government, more assistance given to that end; and an educational campaign should be carried on among the producers themselves. I am not saying, of course, that the selling end should not be looked after to the very best ability of those in charge of that activity, but I repeat that it is in the production end that the prosperity of our great dairy industry lies. I call the government's attention to it in order that more may be done towards increasing production than has been done heretofore.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   PERCENTAGE DEDUCTION FROM GRAINS MARKETED IN SPRING WHEAT AREA-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Full View Permalink

May 17, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

One of the most alarming features in connection with the bacon trade is the poor quality of bacon Canada is putting on the British market. It seems that we consume the best qualities of our bacon at home, where nearly ninety per cent of our production is consumed, and that a poorer quality is shipped overseas. At least it is a fact that our bacon takes only fourth or fifth place in the British market. Consequently it is sold for a good deal less than it should be, and that has a tendency to regulate the price of hogs in this country. I think there should be stricter grading and stricter supervision: of the bacon we export. We can never hope to build up a market in Great Britain until we supply a high grade of bacon. Quantity and quality are the two things that will spell success to the bacon hog raisers of Canada. We must arrange for a continuous supply of high grade bacon; and until there is better supervision of our exports, so that we can place on the British market bacon that will compete with the Danish, Irish and English bacon, we can never hope to get the price for our bacon that we should receive.

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
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May 16, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

Would the commissioner mentioned in section 9 be independent of the committee appointed under section 8? Would they act independently of each other? And what is his function?

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
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May 16, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

The reason I asked that question was this. The county of Lanark stood at the head.

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
Full View Permalink