Thomas Alfred THOMPSON

THOMPSON, Thomas Alfred

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Lanark (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 5, 1868
Deceased Date
May 12, 1953
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Alfred_Thompson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=aa6d068b-338a-49cc-a128-e8b6da7f61b7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Lanark (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Lanark (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 53)


May 24, 1939

Mr. T. A. THOMPSON (Lanark):

There was tabled in this house yesterday a report with

United States Wheat Subsidy

reference to the refusal of the tariff board to impose an excise tax upon vegetable oils.

Topic:   VEGETABLE OILS
Subtopic:   EXCISE TAX
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May 24, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

For several years I have called the attention of the Postmaster General to what I consider a great hardship to the rural mail carriers in Canada. When a rural mail carrier is required, the position is advertised, tenders are asked for, and the position invariably goes to the lowest tenderer so long as he can procure two sureties satisfactory to the department. The contract is made for four years. At the end of that time the man who has the patronage of the riding, the member if his party is in office, or the defeated candidate if the party he supports is in office, is asked whether he will recommend renewal of this contract or whether it should be put up for tender. Here is a man who four years ago purchased a horse, cutter, buggy, harness and equipment. He now finds his contract is put up for tender; someone underbids him, and he is left with his horse and equipment, or car as the case may be, on his hands. No one objects to a government appointing its friends to positions. That is quite right. But when the man who takes that public position, ceases to be a partisan, and gives faithful and loyal service, I have always contended and contend to-day that he should not be removed except for cause. The man who has the patronage of the riding cannot say who is to get the mail contract, but he has the right to ask to have it put up for tender. And the carrier is underbid and ruthlessly thrown out of a position in which he has given faithful service.

Mail is delivered, in the cities also, but a different plan is followed there. When appli-

[M\ Green.]

cations for postmen in cities are invited, the salary is stated. The department select the man they consider most competent to discharge the duties of that position.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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May 24, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

The system is wrong.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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May 24, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

Yes, the commission. In the country, however, they are asked to compete against each other, and then they have no security in their position, for the contract expires at the end of four years. I would ask what I have asked on several previous occasions, that the rural mail carrier be placed in the same position as the city mail carrier. I do not think there should be any discrimination 'between them. These rural mail carriers are rendering a splendid service to the country, and there should be some stability about their positions.

I would suggest that a fair way to deal with the matter would be to place a value per mile on each route. Some routes can be run more economically than others. Some routes are along the highways, where the snow is kept ploughed in the winter and the road is kept in perfect shape. Generally these highways run through the more thickly settled parts of the country, and on those routes the mail can be delivered more cheaply than on country routes where the roads are not kept in the same condition. Put a value of $40, $45 or $50 a mile on these routes, according to their condition; invite applications for the position, stating what the salary will be, as is done in the cities. Then let the civil service commission select the man they consider most competent to discharge the duties of that office. I believe this change should be made.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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May 17, 1939

Mr. THOMPSON:

One of the most alarming features in connection with the bacon trade is the poor quality of bacon Canada is putting on the British market. It seems that we consume the best qualities of our bacon at home, where nearly ninety per cent of our production is consumed, and that a poorer quality is shipped overseas. At least it is a fact that our bacon takes only fourth or fifth place in the British market. Consequently it is sold for a good deal less than it should be, and that has a tendency to regulate the price of hogs in this country. I think there should be stricter grading and stricter supervision: of the bacon we export. We can never hope to build up a market in Great Britain until we supply a high grade of bacon. Quantity and quality are the two things that will spell success to the bacon hog raisers of Canada. We must arrange for a continuous supply of high grade bacon; and until there is better supervision of our exports, so that we can place on the British market bacon that will compete with the Danish, Irish and English bacon, we can never hope to get the price for our bacon that we should receive.

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
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