George Randolph PEARKES

PEARKES, The Hon. George Randolph, V.C., P.C., C.C., D.S.O., M.C., C.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
Birth Date
February 26, 1888
Deceased Date
May 30, 1984
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Pearkes
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a5d20b47-6869-470c-8621-982e467cd0dd&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
soldier

Parliamentary Career

June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Nanaimo (British Columbia)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Nanaimo (British Columbia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
  • Minister of National Defence (June 21, 1957 - October 10, 1960)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
  • Minister of National Defence (June 21, 1957 - October 10, 1960)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 789 of 790)


October 2, 1945

Mr. G. R. PEARKES (Nanaimo):

Has the attention of the Minister of Labour been directed to a strike of the united mine workers *t Nanaimo in demand for double meat rations? Will the government reconsider the question of allowing men who work in strenuous labour projects such extra rations?

Topic:   NANAIMO MINE WORKERS-MEAT RATIONING
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October 2, 1945

Mr. G. R. PEARKES (Nanaimo):

Mr. Speaker, I do not intend to make any address such as "Praise God and pass the ammunition" or to enter into any discussion regarding controls. But while the government- is considering the questions which have been put to them to-day, I should like to raise one point. I have no desire whatever to be provocative or anything but constructive.

We have just come to the victorious conclusion of campaigns in northwest Europe and in the Pacific. Perhaps I use the word "campaigns" advisedly, because I must admit I am a little confused as to whether or not the war is over. One of the principal lessons we have learned from those victorious campaigns is that it has been essential that there should be coordinated effort between the navies, armies and air forces of the allied nations. A few weeks ago we had the privilege of seeing the models and films of "Mulberry", which was the development of .the ports for landing on the coast of France on V-day. I think everyone who saw and studied those models must have been convinced that a vast amount of skilful and detailed planning -had been carried out beforehand in order to ensure the success of the men who were fighting on the

War and Demobilization

beaches, because without that forethought no amount of gallantry would have been of any avail. From the earliest inception of these plans soldiers, sailors and airmen worked together as one staff, closeted in rooms, considering every detail of the parts which those three services should play when the great day came. I may say equally that this practice was followed in the great amphibian operations which were carried out in the Pacific theatte of war.

I submit that we are in the planning stage now when we come to consider the estimates of the three defence services, the planning stage in order that we may preserve the hard-won peace during the next two or three years. I know that is referred to as an interim period; I am not suggesting that the planning is going any farther than this interim period, but I suggest that this is an important period and quite possibly a dangerous one. Therefore I would plead that we do not lose sight of the great lesson we learned during the war, that there must be proper cooperation between the navy, the army and the air force as a prerequisite to any success. I do not believe the ministers of the government and their executive officers have been working in water-tight compartments during the preparation of the estimates they are about to submit for this interim period. I am sure they must have progressed beyond those unhappy days when service estimates were prepared behind closed doors, with the greatest secrecy, because one service was competing against the others for what defence funds the government of the day were prepared to make available.

I do not wish to retard the business of this house. On the contrary I believe that the estimates of the services would be considered more efficiently and dealt with more expeditiously if, before we take up these estimates in committee, some member of the government would give us the results of their deliberations and tell us the over-all picture, so that before we consider each individual service estimate we can see what is the defensive policy of the government and make sure that the three services are coordinated. Otherwise we shall be arguing in the dark, discussing this service and that service without having an over-all picture.

Mr. DOUGLAS G. ROSS (St. Paul's): In the beginning of my remarks, Mr. Deputy Speaker, may I congratulate you upon the honour which has been bestowed upon you in your appointment to the position you now hold.

At a time like this, after a period during which conditions have been so disturbed, and when we find the Big Five having a great deal of difficulty, I think we should consider for a few moments what should be the position of Canada. My ancestors, like those of many others in this house, came to this country years ago. People of many nationalities came to Canada, and they came here because of the British traditions which are followed in this country. They wanted to be free; and when you read the history of Canada you find that all our institutions are founded on the freedom of man and on democracy, based on British traditions. For more than a year Britain stood alone against the whole of Europe. No country helped her except the nations of the commonwealth; and, thank God, Canada was one of those nations. I think it is now about time we supported her in the difficult position in which she finds herself to-day. Everything we have that is good, everything that means freedom, comes to us from those traditions which we have had handed down to us and for which our forefathers shed their blood. They are not new; they are old, the foundation of democracy as we have it to-day, and I think the least we can do is to give Great Britain our support in these difficult times.

The world to-day depends on Great Britain and the United States, a country which has followed our traditions. Let us support Great Britain as one of the members of the Big Five. Let us see to it that we support Great Britain and the United States in their fight for freedom.

Topic:   WAR AND DEMOBILIZATION
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OP $1,365,000,000 FOR WAR PURPOSES, DEMOBILIZATION, PROMOTION OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY, ET CETERA
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October 1, 1945

Mr. G. R. PEARKES (Nanaimo):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to indicate briefly my desire to support this resolution. I do so, first, because I am a returned man. These men who took up farms under the soldier settlement board were comrades of mine in the first great war and I feel that justice should be done to them. Therefore I should like to express my support of this resolution which I believe indicates the road to justice.

Second, I rise because I represent another part of the country. I come from Vancouver island, at the opposite end of the country to that from which the previous speaker comes. On that island there are a large number of veterans who settled under the soldier settlement scheme. I know for a fact that these men have had a trying and difficult time. They have honestly done their best to try to make ends meet.

Farming conditions on Vancouver island are not easy. There are no large farms. There are a few dairy farms, but mostly they are fruit, vegetable and poultry farms. These farms are encircled by the forest, and unless the farmer keeps hard at work, day in and day out, nature encroaches on the small clearing that he has made. You see the bracken and the fern growing up very thickly in the pasture. It is not an easy life.

I noticed that when the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) was speaking the other day he called attention to the fact that eggs were the only farm product which was not selling at parity according to the definition of parity as given that night. A great many of these returned men are in the poultry business and, as one can see from that statement, they must be having considerable difficulty as far as marketing their produce at reasonable prices is concerned.

I also endorse the statement that was made that a large number of these men left their farms at the beginning of this war, either for

motives of patriotism or because of dire necessity. Many of them felt that they would have a better opportunity of making a livelihood from the grants and pay they would receive for their services to their country. Whether it was from patriotism or because of necessity, they joined up in such organizations as the veterans guard of Canada and they did faithful duty in that corps in the way of guarding outlying forts and prisoners of war.

I think I am correct in saying that these men are not entitled to any consideration under the new Veterans' Land Act because they are considered to be too old and therefore not a good risk. As I understand this resolution, it would put that class of men on a parity with the veterans who will be discharged from this war and who may want to take up land under the Veterans' Land Act. I hope most sincerely that the house will give sympathetic consideration to the resolution.

At six o'clock the house took recess.

After Recess

The house resumed at eight o'clock.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-DISPOSAL OP EQUIPMENT PURCHASED FROM AUTOMOBILE COMPANIES
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT
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October 1, 1945

1. Has the Minister of National Defence received a request, from or on behalf of the Pacific coast militia rangers, that they be presented with, or permitted to purchase at a nominal price, the rifles they used during the war against Japan?

2. If so, vha.t action has been taken by the government in this matter?

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST MILITIA RIFLES-RIFLES USED IN WAR AGAINST JAPAN
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October 1, 1945

1. In what cities in Canada are divisional offices of the income tax department located?

2. What were the amounts collected through each office during the past fiscal year?

3. Has the minister received a request from the city of Victoria, British Columbia, that a divisional office be located in Victoria to meet the needs of the taxpayers on the southern portion of Vancouver island?

4. If so, what action is being taken by the government?

Topic:   INCOME TAX-DIVISION AX OFFICES
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