Ian DEANS

DEANS, Ian

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 16, 1937
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Deans
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a4b9c466-c43b-4a3e-b69f-c1bc1878fe3c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
consultant, draftsman, fire fighter

Parliamentary Career

February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
  • N.D.P. House Leader (October 7, 1981 - September 3, 1984)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
NDP
  Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
  • N.D.P. House Leader (September 4, 1984 - September 5, 1986)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 950 of 951)


April 17, 1980

Mr. Ian Deans (Hamilton Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, it is certainly a pleasure to be here. I have looked forward to this day for some time, as you can appreciate, having watched the workings of the federal Parliament for a long number of years.

1 first want to congratulate Madam Speaker on the assumption of her new role, and to say that if the last two or three days are any indication of the way in which she will handle the business of the House, she is to be commended for the way she has picked up and assumed that role.

I also want to congratulate all members who are either returned or have been elected for the first time. 1 know as a first-time member how exciting it is to get elected to Parliament, and how important the role is that we all have to play. I want to say to the constitutents who trooped out to the polls on election day and voted in vast numbers to send me here that I hope I will provide them whith the kind of satisfaction and

April 17, 1980

The Address-Mr. Deans

leadership they anticipated and that, in the final analysis, they will find what I have done here on their behalf will be to their liking and they might even consider sending me back, which is unusual for the constituency that I represent.

1 do not intend to dwell at great length on the constituency, although I want to point out a couple of things that are important in terms of what my constituents feel about both government and Parliament. To begin with, I sent out a little questionnaire not long after the election. 1 asked them to explain to me what they felt were the important matters that should be dealt with by this government and what they expected of me in terms of what I should be saying.

It came through loud and clear that the primary concern of the majority of people, all of whom are very hardworking and have spent a great deal of time trying to build their place in the Hamilton community, is the impact of interest rates, not only in terms of mortgages, although that would be one of the primary concerns, but also in terms of the purchasing power that they are losing day by day to the ever-increasing mortgage interest rate and the ever-increasing consumer rate that they are going to have to pay and, indeed, are now paying.

They are also expressing a concern about the impact of that on jobs as they are unable to find the necessary consumer dollars to buy the goods that they normally would purchase. They know, as I know, as any member here knows, that the impact of that on the people who are working and producing those consumer products that would normally be purchased, is a very great impact indeed. Over the course of the next short while, because of the reduction in purchasing power that the higher and higher interest rates are bringing about, there will undoubtedly be a reduction in the manufacturing sector. That reduction will mean fewer people working. As one person said to me, as fewer people work, those of us who can find jobs will be required to pay even more in order to maintain the structures that we have set up.

It seems to me, and to a lot of people like me in this country, that it is vital that this Parliament address itself immediately to the problem of high interest rates. The cost of purchasing in terms of what must be paid in interest alone has gone all out of proportion. I expect to hear better from the Minister of Finance (Mr. MacEachen) than his statements which, frankly, made no sense in the last two days when he spoke about the small number of people who may be assisted by a mortgage interest program. He spoke about the others who will simply have to bear the burden and find a way to pay it. I know my constituents do not agree with that, and 1 want to make it clear to the Minister of Finance on their behalf that I do not agree with it either.

The high cost of living, which is a subject rarely addressed, exacts its toll on pensioners, on low and middle income families attempting to find their own way. It is time Parliament set aside a block of time to deal with the components which make up the ever-increasing cost of living. It is time members set aside time to speak to each other and to the government about

what specific actions might reasonably be taken to control the ever increasing cost of living because, unless we do, we shall find that the industrial base of the country is being undermined-less and less of the money people earn will be available for the purchase of the things we produce across the country, and if we cannot buy what we produce because we have to tie up so much of the money which is available simply to provide the essentials, then obviously the effect will once again be a reduction in manufacturing and employment.

We must ever be cautious that we do not allow the cost of the essential part of life-housing, food, medical care, education-to reach such outrageous proportions in terms of capacity to earn that people having nothing left to spend on other and more enjoyable but, nevertheless, in our society from an economic point of view, equally important areas in which money ought to be spent.

I want to say a brief word about the problems in Quebec. I do not understand them well, I must confess, and I say to my colleagues from Quebec, not being from Quebec, that it is difficult to be truly understanding of what is happening in that province. I would have liked, tonight, to say a word or two in French, but I say to you, quite truthfully, Mr. Speaker, that had I done that I would not have understood it and, perhaps, neither would you. But I have enrolled in a French class and some day before this Parliament is over 1 swear I will stand here and do it, believe me.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 17, 1980

Mr. Deans:

Be that as it may. In fact, I expect to be here longer. Perhaps he does not. In any event, over the course of the next few years I expect to see the government unveil its strategy for industrial development. But in the meantime, for heaven's sake, take the steps to protect those workers, take the steps to exact from that corporation which has taken its toll on Canada the kinds of guarantees which will assure that we will have not only short-term but long-term benefits that will last for this generation and for many other generations to come.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 16, 1980

Mr. Deans:

Madam Speaker, I assume the minister is familiar with the terms of the contract, since he has indicated he has studied it frequently. Is he prepared to tell the House what terms there are in that contract which guarantee the jobs in the province of Ontario which were supposedly guaranteed at the time the $68 million was extended to Ford?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
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April 16, 1980

Mr. Ian Deans (Hamilton Mountain):

Madam Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce. In view of the fact that the contract between the government of Ontario and the Ford Motor Company-which was negotiated concurrently with the contract between the federal government and the Ford Motor Company-was tabled yesterday in the Ontario legislature and contains no clause which in any way gives Ford the right to restrict making public the terms of the contract, does the minister stand by his statement of yesterday that such a clause exists in the federal contract and, if so, why is it there?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
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April 15, 1980

Mr. Deans:

Might I ask the minister what action he proposes to take to provide some kind of future for the 20,000 auto workers currently laid off, and the many others whose jobs are in jeopardy as a result of mismanagement both by Chrysler and Ford?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   JOBS AVAILABLE IN AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY
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