Ian DEANS

DEANS, Ian

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 16, 1937
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Deans
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a4b9c466-c43b-4a3e-b69f-c1bc1878fe3c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
consultant, draftsman, fire fighter

Parliamentary Career

February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
  • N.D.P. House Leader (October 7, 1981 - September 3, 1984)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
NDP
  Hamilton Mountain (Ontario)
  • N.D.P. House Leader (September 4, 1984 - September 5, 1986)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 948 of 951)


April 24, 1980

Mr. Ian Deans (Hamilton Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, I want to say a word or two about the bill before us, C-19. I was chatting with my colleague, the hon. member for Kootenay West (Mr. Kristiansen) just before I got up to speak. He brought to my attention a quote from John Foster Dulles that I thought might well be appropriate for the context of this debate. It goes as follows: "The measure of success is not whether you have a tough problem to deal with, but whether it's the same problem you had last year". I have to think that if you are going to measure success by that criterion, then this government certainly is successful. If anything, it is very successful given that the problem it is now dealing with is even worse than the problem it had when the legislation was first introduced by its predecessor.

Let me talk for a moment in a little different vein from my colleagues who tended to want to speak about the statistical problems and the values of this piece of legislation statistically. I want to talk about what unemployment really is. It is not a statistic that should be manipulated by politicians for their own particular needs. It is not 7, 8 or 9 per cent of anything. For the majority of people who face it, it is the single most frightening, single most soul-destroying experience.

The very result of unemployment breaks up families, and contributes to excessive alcohol and drug use. It is a symptom that is reflected frequently in child abuse and spouse abuse.

Employment Tax Credit Act

Unemployment is a major contributor to crime. If you were to stop and think about it for a moment, you would agree that unemployment is the single major problem with which we have to cope. If we could deal with the background to unemployment, we would to a great extent have dealt with the social and economic problems that confront the nation at the moment.

We are in a country that is facing a terrible crisis. We are faced with a piece of legislation which, under any other circumstances, would be unsupportable.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT TAX CREDIT ACT
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April 24, 1980

Mr. Deans:

We would like to be charitable and say we understand it is only intended as a stop-gap measure. The problem is, I cannot for the life of me see where the permanent measures are coming from. When can I expect to hear from the government a statement about its policy with regard to employment? When can I expect to hear from the government its policies with regard to the restructuring of the manufacturing sector? When can we expect to hear from the government what its policies are with regard to the auto insurance industry and related industries?

If 1 thought for a moment the bill was intended to Fill a very narrow gap, I would say: very well, let us pass it, let us get on to the real meat of the thing. But you know, and I know, Mr. Speaker-I can tell from the way you are looking at me-we both know there is no legislation forthcoming; I can see it in your eyes. It is just awful. Here we are, standing in the House of Commons; you would think it was a new thing, that we had never heard of it before, that it has just blossomed.

When I was in Hamilton yesterday and people were telling me about their problems-here we have Firestone laying people off and, no doubt, the steel industry will be affected by the auto cutbacks and colleagues and friends of mine laid off in Oakville Ford and all the related industries in the area looking very seriously at cutbacks-they said, "What are you going to do tomorrow when you get back?" I said, "I am going to say a word or two about the employment tax credit bill."

"Hey!" they said, "Is that going to be any good?" Really! What could I say? 1 was embarrassed. And no wonder. This government wins on the strength of promises that ministers are going to deal with the economy, that they are going to wrestle inflation to the ground again. They are really going to put their best foot forward-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT TAX CREDIT ACT
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April 24, 1980

Mr. Deans:

After they get it out of their mouth. Yes, the difficulty here is plain to see. For some of us it is plain, ordinary frustration. We should not be dealing here with this bill tonight. We should be dealing with the meat of the problem. We should be talking about the difficulties which are confronting people across this nation. We should be looking at primary legislation to deal with these things.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT TAX CREDIT ACT
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April 24, 1980

Mr. Ian Deans (Hamilton Mountain):

Madam Speaker, I rise, under the provisions of Standing Order 43, on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity.

In view of reports that United States trade representative Reuben Askew has indicated that no major overhaul of the Canada-U.S. auto pact is likely, and in view of Mr. Askew's statement that the pact is not perceived to be fair and helpful in spite of the $3 billion deficit which Canada now endures, all of which reflects an attitude toward the concerns of Canadian auto workers which could at best be described as unacceptable, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Winnipeg-Birds Hill (Mr. Blaikie):

That this government place before Parliament immediately the measures it intends to take to safeguard the Canadian auto industry and its workers from the continued losses which are occurring.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
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April 24, 1980

Mr. Deans:

I want to suggest two or three small steps- maybe the government could consider them after they get this innocuous, ridiculous, outrageous piece of legislation through. Maybe they could take a look at reducing interest rates as recommended not only by us but by Walter Gordon, among others, who has said that if ever there was a time to move to the reduction of interest rates in the interest of the national economy, this was the time.

Not only should there be a lower interest rate policy, but we should also stabilize rates for a period in order that people could feel reasonably secure about their investments, reasonably secure about their futures, and reasonably secure about their ability to repay what they borrow. That would be the first policy 1 would like to see followed. I think then perhaps we could sit down and look at the auto industry, because it is upon the auto industry that much of Ontario turns, and we have to recognize that unless we take advantage of the situation which is now before us, and unless we are prepared to develop a parts manufacturing sector in Ontario and in the rest of Canada, then we will be forever at the mercy of the United States auto industry. That is plain to anyone.

I am sure there is not a member in this House who would not agree that there is not going to be a return to the good old days when everybody traded in his car every second year, and the auto industry flourished on the basis of that. People are going to keep their cars longer, buy new tires, and maybe even put in new motors. They are going to put in new parts, and unless we are manufacturing those tires, those motors and those parts, then we are going to be left out. Maybe the government could come into the House and spare just a couple of minutes more than the question period to chat about how we together could solve that very vexing and difficult problem.

Perhaps with our interest rate policy we could encourage the building industry to start again building homes for people of average means. The spin-off in the home building industry is phenomenal; 3.6 jobs are created in related industries to every job created building a house. Can hon. members imagine the number of jobs we could create in Canada in related industries if we could get on with the job of building homes for people at prices they could afford, and with mortgages they could afford to pay?

Maybe we could even take some strides to alter dramatically the resource exploitation policies of the past. Perhaps we could insist on further processing in Canada-a novel thought! That probably has never been considered. Maybe we could even

April 24, 1980

Employment Tax Credit Act

consider that since the resources are ours it would be helpful for two or three people if we were to take the resources and do something with them here, instead of sending them out of the country. Can hon. members imagine the spin-off? Can they imagine the benefit?

Then, of course, maybe we could consider our energy policy. Maybe we could take a look at energy as a resource, a catalyst or a tool for the development of this country. Maybe we could sit down and find a way to use it best to stabilize the economy, to build secondary manufacturing, and to develop the kinds of job opportunities which would make this kind of legislation, as I said before, unnecessary.

Then, of course, if someone brought in a piece of rubbish like this, we would know that it was really only intended to deal with such a small and isolated sector of society that we could make it worth while. We could fund it properly. We would not be putting people into low paying and menial jobs but, rather, into jobs that would satisfy them and give them a chance to earn a decent living. That is when this kind of legislation would be useful. It is useless today.

If the government would address itself to these kinds of things, then maybe the people of Canada would feel a little more secure and a little happier about the fact that we are all sitting here-we are not all sitting here, but those of us who are are sitting here. Maybe the minister would even take it upon himself to drop by and listen. He might enjoy it. If he did not enjoy it, he might learn. If he did not learn, he might at least appear to be interested. This might be a worth-while thing to consider.

In any event, the problems of this country are not going to be solved easily, and they are not going to be solved at all unless the process is begun here. This is where it has to start, and if it does not start here it will not start at all.

We put our faith in General Motors, thank you very much. We thought Chrysler, being the big, seventh largest corporation, was wonderful. We wondered how Ford could go wrong. Henry told us it was here to stay. Let us face it, the corporations have shown that they are not able to do this alone, and neither should they be expected to. This is the time for co-operative effort, and there are places in the world where co-operative effort is the order of the day and where industry and government work together.

There are places in the world where labour is consulted, where there is a sense of national purpose, where people really believe that their country means something, and where people are prepared to put out a little more because they know their contribution is both recognized and appreciated. We would not be dealing with this legislation if we could instil that kind of sense in this government.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT TAX CREDIT ACT
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