Charles Gavan POWER

POWER, The Hon. Charles Gavan, P.C., B.A., LL.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Quebec South (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 18, 1888
Deceased Date
May 30, 1968
Website
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Gavan_Power
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a47e2fa3-277a-47c3-8868-2fc0fdddd05a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
  • Minister of Pensions and National Health (October 23, 1935 - September 18, 1939)
  • Postmaster General (September 19, 1939 - May 22, 1940)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
  • Postmaster General (September 19, 1939 - May 22, 1940)
  • Minister of National Defence for Air (May 23, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
  • Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence (May 23, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
  • Minister of National Defence (June 11, 1940 - July 4, 1940)
  • Associate Minister of National Defence (July 12, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 6 of 1532)


February 2, 1949

Mr. Power:

During the session of 1939 a committee of this house was set up to deal with electoral matters. Its third report consisted of a draft bill to amend sections 62 and 63 of the Dominion Elections Act. The bill which is being presented today is an exact copy of that draft bill. May I say that after some consideration the report was adopted by the house in 1939.

The aim of the bill is to limit political expenditures at the constituency level, and to give wide publicity to contributions to campaign funds and to expenditures from campaign funds.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT
Subtopic:   LIMITATION OF ELECTION EXPENSES
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March 5, 1948

Hon. C. G. POWER (Quebec South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. The Ottawa Morning Journal of March 3, quotes Premier Drew of Ontario as saying:

"in seeking to convey the impression, that he was unaware of the threat of early war .im the Pacific prior to the departure of the Hong Kong force in. October, 1941," Prime Minister King "is simply piling falsehood on falsehood."

Later on I am quoted in support of Premier Drew's statement as having said in evidence before the Hong Kong inquiry the following:

I felt, perhaps without any sound- basis except having read these dispatches, that there was a very good1 chance of war breaking out with Japan.

In justice to all parties, including myself, I think I should say that in the very next line of my evidence, in reply to a direct question as to whether I believed war with Japan was imminent, I said no, war with Japan is not imminent.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. POWER-REFERENCE TO PREMIER DREW'S REMARKS ON HONG KONG EVIDENCE
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March 5, 1948

Mr. POWER:

May I say that I am in entire agreement with the hon. gentleman, and if this points any moral at all it is this, that Premier Drew as well as all others concerned should have waited until the evidence was produced before speaking.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. POWER-REFERENCE TO PREMIER DREW'S REMARKS ON HONG KONG EVIDENCE
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February 24, 1948

Hon. C. G. POWER (Quebec South):

Topic:   HONG KONG
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO TABLING OF EVIDENCE AND LETTER FROM MR. DREW
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December 17, 1947

Hon. C. G. POWTER (Quebec South):

Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a happy occasion, and perhaps for me a happy coincidence, that the birth of the Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the House of Commons should coincide with the thirtieth anniversary of my entry to this chamber. It has permitted hon. members who were kind, generous and courteous enough to pay the usual compliments to persons in my position, to couple my name with that of the Prime Minister.

They have been most kind. They have shown that in this House of Commons, even in the midst of an emergency session, one may take time out to deal with matters which ordinarily might be considered as indications of frivolity and perhaps a lack of interest in affairs of state, but which really might better be considered as indications of the spirit of good will in the House of Commons, the spirit of friendship, the spirit of comradeship and of chivalry which is characteristic of this Canadian nation of ours, and which is so well represented by the members of the house.

My right hon. friend the Prime Minister has made some reference to the competition which might exist between us for fatherhood of this house. Speaking for myself, when I

Anniversaries-Mr. King and Mr. Power

look at the brood of children which throngs the benches of this chamber I would say to the Prime Minister that I wish him well in his role of father to all those who sit about him. I also admit freely he has, through his kindness, his fatherly affection and guidance, all the qualities and qualifications of a father in a degree far superior to mine.

For many years the paths of the Prime Minister and myself have followed along parallel lines, although at all times they may have been on vastly different planes. Both of us have taken active parts in political life. For my part I have enjoyed the relationship which has existed between us. of an admiring and devoted1 follower to a respected chieftain. If at times our paths have diverged, there was in no respect a lowering of the honour in which I held him or a lessening of the gratitude which I have had for his kindness. So strong has that attachment been, and it still persists, that I rarely neglect him in my prayers. As one of the few of us who are still continuing Liberals, I pray that he will return to the faith of his forefathers.

You have probably often speculated, Mr. Speaker, as I have, when at the beginning of a session you hear addresses made with respect to those who are no longer here, as to just what will be said about you. If you want to resolve that speculation all you have to do is remain twenty-five years more in this house. You will then be a witness to a full-dress rehearsal. You will also have an advantage over those others in that if hon. members who are making the addresses or observations with respect to you forget to mention salient points which you believe to be important in connection with your career-after all, you know better than those who are speaking about you-you can rise on a question of privilege the next day and correct them.

I have spent half' of my life as a member of this house. It has been a good half life. It has been joyous; it has been one filled with comradeship and kindness. There are no moments of it which I regret. I say that with perfect sincerity. There are those who have the idea that politics is a mean kind of game, that it is filled with disappointments and delusions, but so far as I am aware, and *co far as I have been able to observe during ail these years, politics is filled also with loyalties, with decencies, with honesties, with comradeship, with evidence of the helping hand and the sympathetic spirit. I for one can say that it has been a wonderful life and a good one, and I do not regret it.

My right hon. friend the Prime Minister has often expressed the wish to write a book. That desire comes to almost all of us who have taken some part in public life. I too have thought that perhaps in my retirement I might solace my years and days with the writing of a book. It would not be concerned with the mazes of statecraft nor with the intricacies of international affairs. I should like to write a book about this Commons House of Canada. I perhaps would put it in the form of a homily, ashes to ashes and dust to dust, and I would entitle it "Back to Front and Back Again". I would tell of the long and painful progress down five rows of seats to the front benches, and I would tell also of the short and rapid and sudden transition from a private car to an upper berth. I would perhaps dedicate it to the over-ambitious youth who inhabit the back benches and also to the over-pretentious elderly ones who inhabit I he front benches. I might comment on the title page in ancient Greek, "Mati-otes, Matiotetoun Ta Panta, Matiotes"- "Vanity of vanities; all is vanity".

I cannot close these remarks without making some reference to the constituency of Quebec South which during all these years has shown such patience, tolerance and indulgence in sending me here to represent them, alien though I was in birth and language. That constituency has shown me a measure of confidence which is rare indeed in parliamentary history, and for which I shall be forever grateful.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, may I for a moment forgo parliamentary rules, in the strict sense of the term, to direct a few words to my friends and colleagues of the province of Quebec.

My friends, for years we have stood together in struggle and in triumph, we have been friends in good times and bad. In Canada, I stand as a living example of the tolerance and broad-mindedness characteristic of our fair province since, for thirty years, electors whose language and racial background are other than my own, have been so kind as to return me as their representative.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
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