Robert Lloyd WENMAN

WENMAN, Robert Lloyd

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)
Birth Date
June 19, 1940
Deceased Date
June 14, 1995
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Wenman
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a3e7d649-bca5-467e-93b1-86911b50a1ca&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, investment counsellor, teacher

Parliamentary Career

July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence (November 1, 1984 - October 14, 1986)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Fraser Valley West (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 157 of 158)


October 9, 1974

Mr. Wenman:

I shall be pleased to send over a copy of the speech.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

October 9, 1974

Mr. Wenman:

In the immediate future the tough, unbending negotiating stance of the OPEC countries will intensify the drive by the United States toward greater and greater self-sufficiency. In the final analysis, self-suf-ficieny in the United States in the area of energy resources will undoubtedly depend upon massive developments in the gasification of coal and the production of coal from desert shale. Thus the need for vast quantities of water. And it is in the direction of Canada that the United States government is looking for this water.

The government stand on the export of water needs to be rationalized and clarified forthwith. The more I have dug into this subject the more fearful I have become that secret negotiations are going on between the Liberal administration and the United States government for the export of Canadian water. Statements by high officials, U.S. and Canadian alike, lead to the conclusion that something is afoot.

The cabinet's apparent suppression of recent anti-water export statements by the former minister of the environment, the Hon. Jack Davis, as late as last spring, further heightens the suspicion that the government is likely moving in the disastrous direction of massive export and development of Canadian water. I have in my hand a document the contents of which were to have been delivered to the House of Commons by the former minister of the environment, Mr. Davis-a document which, curiously enough, was not delivered in this chamber. Since it strongly opposed the export of water we can only surmise it was not delivered because it advocated a position at odds with that being adopted by the government. I will read a few quotations from it.

I am going to read to hon. members opposite a few quotations from their friends, and they will be frightened by them. Who stopped this statement being made with regard to Canadian water resources, and why was it stopped? Why was it not issued in the House of Commons? Was it because of the stated position of the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau), who once said in a television interview: "I don't want to be a dog in the manger about this, but if people aren't going to use it, can't we sell it for good, hard cash?" Or was it the new President of the Privy Council (Mr. Sharp) who said, accordingly to Time Magazine: "Within 25 years we shall be exporting water to the United

States." Or was it done by the minister, Mr. Davis himself, who was trying to jump back on the fence in time for political survival by repudiating a statement he had made earlier when he said:

X want you to think of water schemes which are not only basin-wide, but possibly even continental in scope-the Rocky Mountains need no longer contain our thoughts-we can vault over them or tunnel through them and see what lies beyond; so we will be turning whole rivers around.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

October 9, 1974

Mr. Wenman:

What is he going to do? He is going to seek some kind of consensus. He is going to seek answers. I suggest the Canadian people have waited long enough. We are not waiting for the minister to seek answers. We are waiting for him to bring them to us, and bring them to us now.

We have heard talk from the government about new initiatives in foreign policy. Unfortunately we have not heard precisely what the nature of these new initiatives is likely to be. There have been announcements concerning expanded and aggressive participation in international affairs, particularly in the areas of world food aid and the non-proliferation of nuclear technology. No doubt, this is a commendable objective. However, one wonders whether such a thrust might not thin out even further an already inadequate voice in international affairs.

October 9, 1974

The Address-Mr. Wenman

It is obvious, given the current international climate, especially in light of the situation facing our neighbour to the south, that Canada will have to put forth immediately a firm resource policy. A policy of drift-and this is all the government has produced-will simply not do in this time of crisis. It would seem to me that the full force and effort of the Department of External Affairs will be required to prepare us for dealing with our greatest friend and best customer, the United States.

Not only will there be tremendous pressure for extended export and participation in the Athabasca tarsands and other non-renewable resource areas, Canada must also be prepared to take a strong stand regarding the export of Canadian water-a stand which has not been heard in this chamber since it was initiated by my right hon. friend from Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker).

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

October 9, 1974

Mr. Wenman:

If the ministers object so strongly are they going to stand up when I have finished and deny that water will be exported? I certainly hope they intend to do so. But if they say there is to be no export of water, are they just establishing a bargaining position? Will it really mean no? I see the minister is rising on a point of order.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

October 9, 1974

Mr. Wenman:

I am getting to them! I am getting to members on the other side and I love getting to them. Will the new Minister of the Environment (Madam Sauve) stand up and say that no water is to be exported? And, if so, is that to be taken as a real no, or is that no simply a further bargaining stance related to what has become an inevitable policy of exporting massive amounts of Canadian water to the United States, a policy which involves the flooding of millions of acres of Western Canada, the destruction of our precious environment and, worst of all, the establishment of an irreversible trend toward economic and political union with the United States? What has happened to the poetic but perhaps hypocritical words of the Prime Minister who said-

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink