Joseph Israël TARTE

TARTE, The Hon. Joseph Israël, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
St. Mary (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 11, 1848
Deceased Date
December 18, 1907
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Israël_Tarte
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a1231855-4bec-419e-9184-2deabd03d8a5&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
journalist, newspaper editor, notary

Parliamentary Career

March 5, 1891 - January 4, 1893
CON
  Montmorency (Quebec)
January 5, 1893 - April 24, 1896
IND
  L'Islet (Quebec)
August 3, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  St. Johns--Iberville (Quebec)
  • Minister of Public Works (July 13, 1896 - October 21, 1902)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  St. Mary (Quebec)
  • Minister of Public Works (July 13, 1896 - October 21, 1902)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 243)


July 25, 1904

Mr. TARTE.

What is the name of the boat that is running now ?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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July 25, 1904

Mr. TARTE.

The boat now in use is a very strong one. I went all around the gulf in it, but that was before the upper decks were added. She draws 12 feet of water. If the captain is a safe man, he will not take the risk of running during a storm, because the boat could not stand a storm, raised as she has been.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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July 25, 1904

Mr. TARTE.

I would ask the right hon. gentleman to look carefully into this matter. I know the boat very well. The department got it when I was minister. An upper deck has been added to it, which causes it to roll very much in a heavy sea. I think, if the hon. minister will look carefully into the case, he will find it advantageous to change this boat for another one soon. I have been on board it many times, and while I would not like to say anything that would injure the line, because I am very favourable to it, I think that the boat has been raised by two decks, and it would be safer to change it for another. I do not want to throw any cold water on the line-very far from it. But I do not think the boat would be able to stand a heavy storm.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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May 3, 1904

Mr. TARTE.

This afternoon I reminded the House of the fact, that the Grand Trunk is partly an American and partly a Canadian railway. That is not their fault, but is nevertheless a fact, and we cannot lose sight of it in this discussion. I have prepared a short memorandum of the distances I referred to this afternoon. From Winnipeg to Duluth the distance on a straight line is 360 miles ; from Duluth to Ashland ou the Wisconsin Central 76 miles ; from Ashland to Chicago 437 miles, or a total of 873 miles from Winnipeg to Chicago. It is estimated that a road could be built from Winnipeg to Duluth and thence to Ashland for $35,000 per mile, but for the purposes of my calculation I shall place it at $40,000. The road from Winnipeg to Duluth would therefore cost $14,400,000 ; and from Duluth to Ashland $3,400,000 ; total $17,800,000. The Grand Trunk Railway Company-if they have not done so already-could get possession of the Wisconsin Central from Ashland to Chicago for $13,000,000, which would make all told a sum of $30,000,000. which it would be necessary for the Grand Trunk to invest to get a

straight line from Winnipeg to Chicago. Let us say that they will pay four per cent for that money which will not be guaranteed by the Canadian government. That will give them an annual interest charge to meet of $1,200,000. When they reach Chicago they are in their own territory, connecting with their own line which is fully equipped, and the trade from the Canadian Northwest would simply add value to that line as a first class feeder. What is the position of the Grand Trunk in relation to the government project 1 From Winnipeg to Moncton the distance is in round numbers 1.900. Time v\ ill tell whether I am right or wrong, but my own conviction is that that line will cost $50,000 a mile to construct; however I will put it at $40,000 a mile. That would make $76,000,000 on which, at three per cent, the Grand Trunk Pacific would have to pay an annual interest amounting to $2,280,000. In view of this, I ask every businessman of the country to tell where the interest of the Grand Trunk Company lies. Are they going to lose $1,000,000 a year for the love of Canada ? Is it not in

the interest of the Grand Trunk Railway Company, to take the trade of the Northwest to their own line ? What business man will gainsay that proposition. I approve of the GrarnTPruuk entering into the Northwest. Thev are anxious to go there, and the Minister of Justice stated a great truth when he reminded the House, that the prairie section of the Grand Trunk Pacific will he a very paying line. The Canadian Pacific Railway are tohlay building branches without a sking^any Assistance from this parliament.

Topic:   GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY.
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May 3, 1904

Mr. TARTE.

The whole experience of (he American railways tells against the argument of my hon. friend (Mr. Heyd). Take, for instance, the transportation between Chicago and Buffalo. By rail the distance is only 510 miles ; by water it is nearly 900 miles. Yet, let my hon. friend look at the record of the grain trade and be will find that the lake carriers year by year have been taking nearly everything from the railways. Every argument that my hon. friend has deduced is contradicted by hard facts. Figures are strong, but facts are stronger, surely.

Topic:   GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY.
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