Jay Waldo MONTEITH

MONTEITH, The Hon. Jay Waldo, P.C., F.C.A., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Perth (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 24, 1903
Deceased Date
December 19, 1981
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Monteith
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a0f7fa4b-ece7-4588-afc0-d76760d9d88c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
chartered accountant

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Health and Welfare (August 22, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Health and Welfare (August 22, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (September 29, 1961 - April 21, 1963)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Health and Welfare (August 22, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (September 29, 1961 - April 21, 1963)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Health and Welfare (August 22, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (September 29, 1961 - April 21, 1963)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Perth (Ontario)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair (January 1, 1966 - January 1, 1968)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Perth (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 677)


June 22, 1970

Mr. J. W. Monteith (Perth):

My question is for the Minister of National Health and Welfare. An article datelined Montreal appeared recently in the Globe and Mail concerning the arrest of two persons for selling counterfeit pills. Reference was made to the fact that over 900,000 of these pills came from Ontario. In view of the fact that this is the kind of operation that could have underworld backing, does the government know in which Ontario plant these alleged counterfeit pills were made?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   HEALTH AND WELFARE
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June 15, 1970

Mr. Monleith:

The motion itself reads:

That, in the opinion of this House, in view of the Government's inability to effectively combat the frightening increase in the public debt-

22478-23}

Suggested Interest-free Loans

So far I agree. I think it should be stressed that this situation is one of the government's own creation. The huge increase in debt in the last few years, the huge increase in taxation and the increase in inflation have been caused by government mismanagement. World-wide conditions have been difficult to combat. I admit that. Since 1965, this government has been heading into the situation in which we find ourselves now. Today, we have a situation in which the government is at least suggesting controls. There are implied guidelines. Presumably, the government is on an austerity kick, although expenditures for the year ending March 31, 1971 are some 9 per cent higher than for the last fiscal year. I call this irresponsibility on the part of the government. When this debate on debt free money came up today, I recalled the debate which took place in November, 1962. I should like to point out that the following appears in Hansard of that year at page 1331:

The tight money policy which was Introduced as part of the austerity program, and by this I mean restrictive credit and high interest rates, was bound to slow down business activity. High interest rates were bound to make it difficult for municipalities to proceed with badly needed works and services. This, in turn, could not fail to slow down construction and this is bound to mean fewer jobs this winter.

But instead of worrying about a program which would lead to the employment of more people in this coming winter, the government seemed much more anxious to placate those who had moved their money out of Canada and to beg them, in the form of high interest rates on their investments, to bring it back. The effects of the government's tight money policy are bound to fall most heavily on small businessmen and on those parts of the country such as the maritimes and the Minister of Finance's own province of Nova Scotia where capital is especially hard to come by. Why we should go on punishing our own people in this way is beyond my comprehension. But that is what we are1 doing under this emergency tight money policy.

Those are the words of the Hon. Walter Gordon. I suggest that those words apply today. I feel convinced that the Minister of Justice (Mr. Turner), who listened intently to the last speaker, will probably vote for this motion again today. Since the members of the Liberal party voted for a similar proposition in 1962 they will probably be quite ready to support it today.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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June 15, 1970

Mr. Monleith:

My purpose in speaking today is to point out that I feel this is the wrong approach. I admit that an approach should have been made back around 1965, but

June 15, 1970

Suggested Interest-free Loans it is not too late yet for this government, which does not know restraint, to start showing some restraint. I should like to mention in passing that the last speaker was entertaining. I recall a member of the Social Credit Party, the hon. member for Lethbridge of that day, who always participated in the debate on the estimates of the Department of Finance. In those days the estimates were considered in the House, as any hon. members who were where here will recall. This particular hon. member always spoke three times on the estimates of the Department of Finance He spoke once on the estimates themselves. Then, he spoke on Social Credit theory and, finally, on the Turkish-Mongolian conspiracy. This was always most entertaining.

The hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette) was as entertaining today, if not more so, but at the same time he failed to convince us that the use of debt free money is the way to cure the situation. The government, during free time for Political broadcasts on t.v. last August, came out with a big hullabaloo about what it was going to do under the austerity program. This was a lot of nonsense. The government has not done anything. A few commissionaires employed at various places may have been laid off and some other people on the lower income bracket may have been laid off, but actually the government is building up the hierarchy. A power house is being built up around the Prime Minister's (Mr. Trudeau) office. This is enough to frighten anyone. We are approaching what I would suggest very definitely is a socialistic dictatorship. I know of a country in the Middle East which suggests it has a con-stituional monarchy form of government. I call it a benevolent dictatorship. This is not even a benevolent dictatorship.

This government, for instance, a few months ago renewed the 3 per cent surcharge. In addition, this government changed the constitution under which our system of government operates. In February, 1968 they were defeated on a money bill and refused to resign, so, in effect they changed our whole system of constitutional authority.

e (4:30 p.m.)

Now, they have renewed that 3 per cent surcharge which replaced the 5 per cent on which they were defeated, and if, as, and when the white paper should become legislation-pray God it never does-this temporary tax will be melded into one tax rate which the people of Canada will have to face forever.

[Mr. Monteith.l

I suggested earlier, Mr. Speaker, that I would not go over my time so you do not have to point out to me that my time has expired. I propose to sit down now, but before doing that I want to point out, something to the hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette). He suggested that the Conservatives would only do the same as the Liberals, that we would be very concerned about the situation. We have proven our ability to be concerned about the situation which has existed here in Canada since 1965. I cannot support this motion no matter how well intentioned it may be.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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June 15, 1970

Hon. J. W. Monleith (Perth):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to congratulate the last speaker who participated in this debate, because at least two-thirds of what he said was right. His speech was entertaining and forceful, but unconvincing. He suggested that if he were given some additional time he would be able to convince the members of the House, and Canadians as a whole, of the correctness of Social Credit theory, but I am afraid he left me unconvinced. I do not expect to be lengthy in my remarks. I merely wish to show that the Conservative party is at least consistent. On November 6, 1962 we opposed a motion to this effect-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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June 15, 1970

Mr. Monleith:

Yes, a lot of people remember it. The motion called for debt free money. The Conservative party at that time opposed this particular motion and they are opposing it today. It is interesting to note that on November 6, 1962 the Liberals voted for debt-free money.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink