Daniel James Macdonnell HEAP

HEAP, Daniel James Macdonnell, B.A., B.D.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Trinity--Spadina (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 24, 1925
Deceased Date
April 25, 2014
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Heap
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a03c4e49-6a3d-4810-831e-4e694d169628&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
priest, printer, worker

Parliamentary Career

August 17, 1981 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Spadina (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
NDP
  Spadina (Ontario)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Trinity--Spadina (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 375 of 376)


October 30, 1981

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Mr. Speaker, I have a brief comment to make in this debate. I hope to make my maiden speech on the budget. I have talked this over with my colleagues in caucus and they have assured me that they will still regard me as a maiden then! However, no one knows when the budget will be brought down. The last word was November 12, but we were not told whether it is November 12, 1981, November 12, 1982, or November 12, 1983.

The last two weeks have been very interesting and in some ways very entertaining. My hon. friends to the extreme right have to be commended. Over the last two weeks they have really done a splendid job. They have carried out an act that I did not think could be sustained like that for two solid weeks. Without even cracking a smile, hon. members have stood in their places, waved their arms, pointed their fingers and almost cried, complaining about socialism. I must say they have done a beautiful job of it. They have talked about blood on Liberals' sleeves and about the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) being a crypto-socialist. They have talked about confiscation and about robbery. To keep all of that going for two weeks without even cracking a smile, they deserve some kind of an actor's award. They have done so well that I might have believed them.

I am a socialist, of course. I might have taken some heart that this bill was socialist and believed them until I looked at some of the provisions in Bill C-48. Among other things I find that we will be giving 93 cents of every dollar to Canadian oil companies to spend on development. Oil companies get the 93 cents whether they find oil or not. If they find oil, however, and only if they find oil, the government takes back 35 cents, comprised of 25 cents in equity and ten cents in royalty. This 93 cents comes from the taxes of bus drivers, women who clean buildings, factory workers and all the other people who cannot dodge income taxes.

My leader asked the Prime Minister in the last few days about people who earn, say, $50,000 or $100,000 who can dodge paying their taxes, but his questions were brushed off. The money for oil exploration comes from people who cannot dodge their taxes, basically the wage or salary earner in Canada, the ordinary working man. Those are the people being taxed to give Canadian oil companies 93 cents of every dollar that they invest. If we are lucky, the country will get back 35 cents out of the 93 cents. If the working people are lucky, they may get some of that money back in education and health care.

These poor, starving oil companies are getting a free gift of only 58 cents out of every dollar spent on projects which will net them unlimited profits as the years go by and oil shortages increase. This is a subsidy oil companies are receiving from the bus drivers and other people who cannot dodge income tax. Hon. members to the right call it socialism. There is a phrase "socialism for the rich". If that is what they mean, what the former leader of our party called the corporate welfare bums, then what they are saying is true. Nevertheless, I must admire my hon. friends for talking about the subject for two weeks,

October 30, 1981

Canada Oil and Gas Act

calling it socialism but never mentioning that they and their friends are the beneficiaries of what they call socialism, at the same time pretending it is a great crime, that it is confiscation. It is a kind of confiscation, but it is not a confiscation of something that oil companies created. They did not create the tundra, nor did they create the Beaufort Sea. One hon. member even admitted that the oil is worthless while it is under the ground and under the sea. But all of a sudden, if the government wants to tax it, we hear their cries of confiscation. It is a kind of confiscation of the hard-earned tax money of the ordinary working people of Canada which will make the rich richer. It is a wonderful act my friends on the right have carried on for the past two weeks.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA OIL AND GAS ACT
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October 29, 1981

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

As a supplementary I would ask the minister, in light of the fact that he does not seem prepared to rescind his decision, will be consider relocating some of the immigration consular staff within India, making our service more geographically available to all parts of India, and will he take the necessary steps to ensure that all bona fide visitors to Canada can obtain visas upon arrival at Canadian ports of entry?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   LOCATION OF CANADIAN IMMIGRATION SERVICES IN INDIA
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October 29, 1981

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Madam Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of Employment and Immigration. Would the minister tell the House why, having failed to supply adequate immigration services in India and in Canadian ports of entry, thus causing an extraordinary backlog of Indian nationals waiting to visit or seek refugee status in Canada, he chose to resolve the problem he created by a measure which discriminates against the largest member of the Commonwealth, requiring visas for all Indian nationals wishing to visit Canada? Would the minister tell us why?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION
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October 22, 1981

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, October 14, I asked the Minister of Finance (Mr. MacEachen) on behalf of the Spadina voters who sent me here if he would instruct the Governor of the Bank of Canada to lower the interest rate structure to a tolerable level. The minister's reply was disappointing. He merely saluted the worn-out dogma that high interest rates are anti-inflationary. Is he still asking Canadians to believe that he will cure high prices by pricing

Adjournment Debate

money higher than this country has ever seen before in order to cool down inflation? This was the policy of the late Conservative government, to concentrate spending power in the hands of a few, a policy that pleases those few and only those few.

This is still Conservative policy, as shown by the fact that when the leader of the nominal opposition asked questions on this last week, he was careful to avoid asking that the interest rate be brought down. He just said, let's have a review. He asked that there be subsidies to home owners rather than a new interest rate and investment policy that would bring health back to our economy.

What is disappointing and new is that the Liberal government, through the Minister of Finance, has also completely surrendered now to the philosophy of making the rich richer and the poor poorer. This present government and the one before it proved this policy to be a failure.

Inflation ran at 10 per cent in 1977. In four years, while inflation rose from 10 to 13 per cent, interest rates were going from 12 to 15 to 18 to 20 per cent and beyond. They had nothing to do with stopping inflation.

The government's new energy prices, up one third from last year, are sure to push inflation higher still. Will the minister care if interest rates rise to 25 or 30 per cent? The question is, how long can we wait for the minister's dogmatic policy to cure inflation? In fact, his cure is worse than his disease. His high interest rates are not cooling down demand as much as they are choking off production and supply and making inflation worse.

The number of officially unemployed jumped in one month, September, by 18 per cent. That is, 144,000 more Canadian men and women are not allowed to work productively. Does the minister like that cure for inflation? The Spadina voters clearly do not.

Small business bankruptcies jumped in that same month by 26 per cent. Spadina is the major small business centre for Ontario, if not for Canada. We have retail stores, specialty service shops, hundreds of textile and clothing manufacturers and distributors, the printing trades, the office furniture and supply trades, the restaurant and entertainment establishments and many more small and medium-sized businesses. Does the minister take pride in driving them into bankruptcy at a rate now increased by 26 per cent?

We have, I admit, very little farmland in Spadina, but our people do like to eat. We are told by the National Farmers Union that farmers now no longer spend 15 but 30 per cent of their income on carrying charges. No wonder grocery prices are rising faster than any other part of our cost of living. The banks take their share before we eat.

Does the minister plan to price food absolutely beyond the reach of Canadian working people? That might cure inflation in a sense, but not many of us would be around to enjoy it. There is, of course, one small group who are not suffering. The assets of the five largest banks in Canada went from $42 billion in 1970 to $260 billion in 1980, a fivefold increase.

October 22, 1981

Adjournment Debate

Their profits went from $362 million in 1970 to $1,186 million in 1980, an increase of two and one quarter times. During that time, this Liberal government, whose Minister of Finance tells us about his daily conversations with the bankers, generously reduced their effective tax rate from 46 per cent to 16 per cent, less than a bank teller pays. How did the banks respond to that handout? Those corporate welfare bums increased the spread between the rate they pay to their depositors and the rate they charge their borrowers by 50 per cent.

The working men and women, Mr. Speaker, and small business operators of Spadina have recently shown this government that they are not the docile and stupid voters that this government thought they were when it sprung the Spadina byelection. If the minister persists in feeding his friends, the bankers, by starving the people who produce the wealth in Canada, the rest of the Canadian voters will soon send them the same message.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   REQUEST THAT GOVERNOR OF BANK OF CANADA BE INSTRUCTED TO LOWER INTEREST RATES
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October 14, 1981

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Madam Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Finance.

Topic:   REQUEST THAT GOVERNOR OF BANK OF CANADA BE INSTRUCTED TO LOWER INTEREST RATES
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