Colin CARRIE

CARRIE, Dr. Colin, B.Sc. (Hons.), D.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Oshawa (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 11, 1962
Website
http://colincarriemp.ca
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9fb311fc-3875-4698-b13c-014f0d819393&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
colin.carrie@parl.gc.ca
Profession
chiropractor

Parliamentary Career

June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Oshawa (Ontario)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Oshawa (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Oshawa (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health (November 7, 2008 - September 18, 2013)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Oshawa (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health (November 7, 2008 - September 18, 2013)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
October 19, 2015 -
CPC
  Oshawa (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 263)


June 6, 2019

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Hamilton Mountain, the place where I was born. I have to say that I still have that steel guy inside me. In my community of Oshawa, steel is so important for the auto sector. He mentioned a friend of mine, Roger Paiva, from Gerdau Ameristeel Corporation, and how important the steel and aluminum sector is to my community.

Earlier on, the member mentioned the uncertainty and the mess the current government has created, and I am extremely concerned. I know both our communities are very happy this bill is being debated in the final days of the current government. It is a very important issue.

My colleague from Durham spoke about how this is something the bigger companies want to see moved forward as quickly as possible, but for regional suppliers, fabricators and different communities there needs to be something else done. We talked about this $2 billion the Liberals are sitting on and holding. That could be spread to the companies that are going to be so negatively affected, especially if we go forward and implement this bill as is.

In order to decrease the uncertainty out there, I was wondering if the NDP would be supporting our amendment, which my colleague from Durham read into the record. He said he agreed with my colleague from Durham. Because there is such a short period of time, we do not have the time to debate this as well as we could. Therefore, could he give us some certainty and let Canadians know if the NDP will be supporting our amendment, which would make this better by working together?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Customs Tariff
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June 6, 2019

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I am happy that the government is moving on this.

We in the Conservative Party wanted the government to take action over two years ago. As a matter of fact, when we had the minister in committee, we found out that a year before the Americans put tariffs on our steel and aluminum sector, the Americans asked Canada to come on board and help out. Basically, because of dithering and incompetence, Canadian companies have been suffering with these steel and aluminum tariffs since that time.

The bill is extremely important, especially in my community, where we build automobiles and have Gerdau Ameristeel.

The government has collected over $2 billion in tariffs, and because of the way it is enacting the bill, some companies may be affected negatively. What is the government going to do to dispense, perhaps regionally, this $2 billion, this massive amount of money? The government has collected it and has promised to get it out to the affected companies, but it has really done absolutely nothing. What is the government going to do to address any inadvertent harm from the bill and get money out to the producers and manufacturers that require that support?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Customs Tariff
Full View Permalink

June 4, 2019

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I as well am very saddened the government is using closure again. As everyone in the House knows, my community has faced some devastating news with the closure of the General Motors plant. We will have a few jobs remaining.

I have been doing round tables for the manufacturing sector and there seems to be a message out there about lack of competitiveness. The government is moving forward on an agenda without actually dealing with our productivity issues and the competitiveness issues. Sadly, one of the things the government could do is to remove some of the uncertainty it is putting out there. If you look at our trade situation, about 76% of our trade is with the United States and basically the Americans are winning at every attempt they move forward with.

I know the Liberals know this, but they put in a carbon tax and the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says it could be as high as $5,500 per tonne by 2030. It would get rid of a lot of the uncertainty if the Liberals would let Canadian companies know what their carbon tax will be by 2030. I wonder if the minister would tell us here today.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Budget Implementation Act, 2019, No. 1
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June 4, 2019

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the work that the member for Brampton South and I did together on the health committee. I have a question about the budget.

As everyone in the House knows, Oshawa has had some really rough times with the closure of the GM plant. This year the government will have a $20 billion deficit. Because the world economy has been doing so well, there are $20 billion in new revenue. I hear my Liberal colleagues talk about creating one million new jobs.

I want to throw out a scary statistic for my Liberal colleagues and also for my colleagues on this side. If we look at a $20 billion deficit and $20 billion in revenue, the $40 billion extra spent this year is enough to have one million Canadians making $40,000 a year just to sit at home. If this is the type of job creation the Liberals are talking about, I really have a problem with that.

Right now Canada's competitiveness has gone down three points in the G7. We are the point where we have gone down to the 13th least competitive.

My colleague has an auto sector in her community. She has seen job losses. Could she point out in the budget if there is anything that will help the Brampton plant when it is time to acquire a new mandate for that plant? Is there anything in the budget that will help these plants compete properly with American plants so they can get a new product in those plants?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Budget Implementation Act, 2019, No. 1
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June 4, 2019

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, my colleague made the comment that people cannot visualize what $1 billion is. Well, the Liberals this time around this year had a $20-billion deficit. They also had $20 billion in extra revenue because the world economy is doing so well. That is $40 billion they spent that they did not plan on and that no one planned on having. To put that in perspective, that is like giving one million Canadians a cheque for $40,000 and allowing them to sit at home doing nothing. If this is the Liberal idea of a job creation plan, I think we have to question that.

I would like to ask my colleague a very important question. If the Liberals continue to go down this route of deficit spending, which we have seen in Ontario, where Ontario became the worst sub-national government in the world, and these deficits become the taxes of the future and the cuts of the future, what does the member think will happen to our country? Will it be exactly what has happened to Ontario?

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Budget Implementation Act, 2019, No. 1
Full View Permalink