Bob DECHERT

DECHERT, Bob

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 18, 1958
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dechert
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9d1e4c91-5600-4728-a706-d812d6695e8b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (May 25, 2011 - September 18, 2013)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
May 2, 2011 -
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (May 25, 2011 - September 18, 2013)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 100 of 100)


November 19, 2008

Mr. Bob Dechert (Mississauga—Erindale, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to rise today and second the motion for an Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

I want to thank the Governor General for her gracious remarks. I also want to thank the Prime Minister for granting me this great honour, and I especially wish to thank the voters of Mississauga--Erindale for granting me the honour and privilege of serving them as their member of Parliament.

I would also like to thank my wife, Ruth, for her care and support, and my parents for instilling in me, at an early age, a respect for this great institution.

My colleague from Portage—Lisgar has spoken already about much of our governing agenda. I would like to add some thoughts.

In the broadest possible terms, Her Excellency's speech focused on a single key theme: protecting Canada's future.

We live in a time of challenge and change. This is true internationally, and it is most certainly true here at home.

Our government is mindful of the responsibility with which we have been entrusted. We will protect Canada's future. We will follow through.

Of course this begs the question of what it means to protect Canada's future. It means, first and foremost, protecting Canadians' personal financial security. This means taking action, in concert with our global allies and trading partners, to address the global credit crisis. The credit crunch is still causing hardship to too many current and potential homeowners, as well as to businesses looking to grow and expand. The Minister of Finance has already announced several steps to protect the finances of Canadians in these uncertain times, and I am sure my fellow members join me in looking forward to his upcoming economic update.

Protecting Canadians' personal financial security also means understanding the distress caused by the current turmoil in global stock markets, including Canada's own. This is a frustrating challenge, to be sure. Free markets, by their very nature, cannot be controlled by government policy. They are as much about psychology as they are about economics, but the impact of the roller-coaster ride on the markets is very real. These are people's personal pensions, their savings, and their RRSPs.

Turmoil on the markets is therefore not just a Bay Street concern; it is a Main Street concern, which is why we must reassure investors inside and outside Canada that our regulatory system, our monetary policy, and our overall financial balance sheets remain strong.

What we must not do is provide investors inside or outside Canada with as much as a whiff of panic. That is why we know that knee-jerk reactions to the latest economic headlines are the wrong way to go. That is why we maintain that Canada's financial sector is well managed, on a sound footing, and in far better shape than those of most other countries, an assessment that is shared internationally by groups ranging from the World Economic Forum to the IMF, and that is why we will continue to work with our allies and trading partners on a smart, coordinated, long-term and global response to this crisis, because it is impossible for any one country to stabilize its own markets when everywhere else there is turmoil.

Protecting Canada's future also means protecting Canada's economy, and that includes Canadian jobs, investment, and trade.

My own professional background happens to include international business and trade law. I have seen a lot of economic cycles over the years, and it is true that this situation currently before us is unlike anything we have seen. Some of the reactions, however, are predictable. In a time of economic instability, there is always a tendency by some to respond by proposing closed borders, restricting trade, and advocating protectionist measures.

Protectionist sentiment is an unfortunate and natural reaction to economic anxiety. It is unfortunate because protectionism ends up destroying jobs and reducing the standard of living of the very people it is supposed to help.

Our government will continue to support open trade. We will do so by continuing to seek out new trading opportunities, be it through pursuing cross-border opportunities with the incoming Obama administration in the United States or through pursuing new trade agreements in Europe, Asia, the Americas and elsewhere.

We will also continue to invest in the Atlantic and Pacific gateways and in vital border corridors, such as the Detroit River international crossing. This will increase trade, investment, and jobs on both coasts and in border towns as well as ensure that Canadian goods and services reach the markets of our trading partners. We will encourage economic development in the north by reducing the regulatory hurdles on the construction of pipelines so that northerners can see more real benefits from their natural riches.

Canadian workers facing transition can continue to count on our support. We will continue to look for new ways to support vital sectors of our economy, whether they be in manufacturing, forestry, agriculture, fisheries or mining, so Canadians can continue to compete and succeed on the world stage.

Protecting Canada's future also means protecting the environment.

I cannot put it more plainly than this: the environment is now an economic issue. We cannot separate the commitment to long term environmental sustainability with that of long term economic growth.

Our government remains firmly on course to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020 and, as the Governor General informed us, we will set an objective that 90% of our electricity needs will be met by non-emitting sources by that date as well.

Where once Canadians found themselves adapting to a time of unprecedented high oil prices, today we find ourselves adapting to the new normal of a lower international price of oil. In some ways this is a benefit. Canadians who were shocked by high gas prices in recent months are now saving money each time they fill up at the pumps.

However, at the same time, given that much of our economy is dependent on the energy sector, these lower prices create certain economic challenges as well. Our government sees this as an opportunity to diversify the energy sector in our country and, in particular, an opportunity to continue to develop new, cleaner energy sources.

Protecting Canada's future also means protecting the health and safety of Canadians. Our government will continue to build on the successes of the last Parliament to ensure that our laws respect the victims, protect the innocent and hold the guilty accountable for their crimes.

Considering that the threat of global terrorism is still very real, we will also table a new national security statement that will clearly detail the steps we will take to ensure that Canadians are protected from terrorism and other serious global threats.

We will also continue modernizing our food and safety laws to ensure that Canadians can always have faith in the products on their store shelves. There will be new accountability, more oversight, more recall powers and increased penalties for those who put the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

Protecting Canada's future also means contributing to global security. Just as our financial security is linked to the global economy, Canada's physical security is linked to the stability and security of other nations around the world.

We will continue to protect Canada's borders, including our Arctic frontier. We will continue to promote the Canadian values of freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law on the world stage. Canada will not shirk its obligation to stand up for these human values and human rights because freedom, democracy and the rule of law are the pathway to a better, safer world.

We will continue to rebuild the Canadian Forces with the best possible equipment to protect our brave soldiers when they are in harm's way. While we will continue to engage in the international mission in Afghanistan, we will focus more of our attention on reconstruction and development, while preparing to end the military side of the mission in 2011.

Protecting Canada's future also means building stronger institutions and strengthening our representative democracy.

Politics is a competitive business. We all know that. However, when it comes to big national projects, projects that by nature and necessity transcend traditional, regional or partisan divides, we owe it to ourselves, our constituents and future generations to make government accountable and effective.

Now our government has introduced some positive reforms to our democratic institutions that we believe are examples of positive, non-partisan reforms.

Ensuring that the House better reflects the Canadian population or introducing democracy to the Senate are concepts on which all Canadians should be able to agree. We will continue to pursue these stronger, more democratic institutions, and we will welcome any cross-party support.

We will also continue to strengthen Confederation itself. As members know, it was just last week that the Prime Minister met with the premiers to discuss the current global economic instability. Canada works best when we all work together. We will continue to respect the jurisdiction of the provinces while ensuring that federal transfers are sufficient to ensure that all Canadians can count on world-class health, education and other services close to home.

Perhaps the most important institution of all is this House. In this chamber every Canadian is supposed to have a voice through their elected representatives. Canadians do not expect us to agree on everything, but they do want our voices, their elected voices, to be focused on solutions and not on divisive rancour.

I am proud to second this motion, and I throw my full support behind the Governor General's remarks. May we conduct this debate, and all of our debates, with the passion and vigour of our beliefs while at the same time respecting this House, respecting each other and respecting our common obligations to all Canadians.

Topic:   Speech from the Throne
Subtopic:   Address in Reply
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November 19, 2008

Mr. Bob Dechert

Mr. Speaker, Canadian people understand that in these tough economic times, their jobs contribute to all our government institutions. In order to ensure that we can fund health care and education, we need to keep our jobs and our economy strong.

Today the Governor General has laid out a very clear plan to show Canadians how we will continue to keep our economy strong and make their incomes and pensions secure so we can have all the good things that government provides to us.

Topic:   Speech from the Throne
Subtopic:   Address in Reply
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November 19, 2008

Mr. Bob Dechert

Mr. Speaker, I believe all members in the House will agree that the people of Canada want us to work together to ensure that Canada's economy remains strong and that their jobs and the health of their families are secure.

The Governor General outlined today that the government would make it a priority to secure jobs for families and communities throughout Canada by encouraging skilled trades and apprenticeships, supporting workers facing transition and providing further support to automotive and aerospace industries.

It will expand investment in trade by modernizing investment, competition and copyright laws, while working with the United States to address shared challenges and pursuing trade agreements in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

By keeping our economy strong and people's jobs safe and working together to do so, I believe we will be able to address all the concerns of Canadians in the months and years ahead.

Topic:   Speech from the Throne
Subtopic:   Address in Reply
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