Bob DECHERT

DECHERT, Bob

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 18, 1958
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dechert
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9d1e4c91-5600-4728-a706-d812d6695e8b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (May 25, 2011 - September 18, 2013)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
May 2, 2011 -
CPC
  Mississauga--Erindale (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (March 5, 2010 - May 24, 2011)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (May 25, 2011 - September 18, 2013)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice (September 19, 2013 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 100)


June 19, 2015

Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, ever since we were elected, our government has put the rights of all victims first, regardless of their gender, race, or religion. We are aware that the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs made amendments to the bill. The House hopefully will have an opportunity to review these changes in accordance with parliamentary procedure. There are significant protections currently found in the Canadian Human Rights Act as well as in the Criminal Code.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Justice
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June 19, 2015

Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as this is my last opportunity to speak near the end of the session, I would like to wish you, the staff and all of my colleagues on both sides of the House a happy Canada Day and a wonderful summer.

I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 2013-14 Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime annual report and government response.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime
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June 18, 2015

Mr. Bob Dechert

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Northumberland—Quinte West very much for his long service in the House of Commons. I had the privilege of serving with him on the justice committee in two sessions of Parliament. I know he served very capably on the defence committee, the public safety committee, and many other committees. His experience as a police officer gave him first-hand knowledge of the things we discussed in the justice committee. His knowledge was invaluable to the deliberations of the justice committee on all of the bills that the government passed. I will very much miss his wise counsel in this place and I wish him the very best in his future endeavours. I think he is going to see a little more of his fishing rod over the next few months and years than he has over the last nine.

Having said that, my response to his question is that many jurisdictions in the world have this kind of a clemency system. It is actually quite common. It puts this very important decision in the hands of the individuals who are directly accountable to the people.

He referred to the family of one of the victims of Clifford Olson. I believe he was referring to Sharon Rosenfeldt. I heard her very heart-wrenching and gut-wrenching testimony about how this sneering, heinous criminal would ask to be released at his parole hearing every two years and then take the families of his victims through the awful murders he committed of their children. They had to go there every two years and go through that process over and over again. This is what this bill is aimed at reducing. It would give the families of victims some peace knowing that such individuals will stay behind bars and never harm another Canadian.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Life Means Life Act
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June 18, 2015

Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as we are approaching the end of the session, I would just like to take this opportunity to thank the people of Mississauga—Erindale for the extraordinary privilege they have given me to represent them, since 2008, in this place. I hope to earn their trust again and return here in the fall. I look forward to seeing all of my colleagues here when I do.

I rise today to speak in support of Bill C-53, the life means life act. By eliminating parole eligibility for high treason and for the most heinous murders, the criminal law amendments in this bill would ensure that the worst offenders spend their entire lives in prison.

The reforms in Bill C-53 grew out of the commitment made by our government in last fall's Speech from the Throne to amend the sentencing laws to ensure that a life sentence means a sentence for life for the most dangerous criminals.

I predict that these proposals will be welcomed by the public as another important step by our government to protect Canadians from the most violent and incorrigible offenders. I also predict that they will be strongly welcomed by the families and loved ones of murder victims, who, under the laws that now stand, run the risk of being re-traumatized every time the offenders responsible for their losses apply for parole.

In that respect, I think of Sharon Rosenfeldt, the mother of one of Clifford Olson's victims, who, along with her family, had to go to parole hearings every two years, under the old faint hope clause regime, to hear Clifford Olson tell them why he should be released. They had to relive the trauma of losing their son every two years, time and time again.

In this respect, Bill C-53 would complement other victim-oriented measures sponsored by our government, such as Bill C-32, the Victims Bill of Rights Act. A key purpose of both Bill C-53 and Bill C-32 is to prevent those who have already been victimized by criminals from being re-victimized by the criminal justice system.

As I mentioned, the reforms set out in Bill C-53 target high treason and certain forms of murder. Both offences are currently subject to a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment, with the right to apply for parole after a set period of time in custody.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Life Means Life Act
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June 18, 2015

Mr. Bob Dechert

Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge and thank the hon. member for his work on the justice committee.

The answer to his question is simply that when Canadian people see these kinds of heinous murders committed, they want the individuals to get life sentences, meaning that these people will be in prison for life. These are dangerous people who should not be back on the street.

The Minister of Public Safety can always seek the advice of the Parole Board, but there have been cases where people have been released who Canadians think should have been kept incarcerated. We believe these people should be in prison for their natural lives, and in the one circumstance where, after 35 years, as a question of proportionality, they are allowed to seek release, that release should be in the hands of the elected official who is accountable to the people, just as it is, for example, in the United States with the clemency provisions that the President of the United States has.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Life Means Life Act
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