Lyle Dean MACWILLIAM

MACWILLIAM, Lyle Dean, B.Sc., M.Sc.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Okanagan--Shuswap (British Columbia)
Birth Date
July 31, 1949
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyle_MacWilliam
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9c8ce4b0-87b5-4ab6-9645-c4e81555e158&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
instructor - martial arts, market researcher-educator, teacher

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Okanagan--Shuswap (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 93)


June 9, 1993

Mr. MacWilliam:

Mr. Speaker, my colleague from the Liberal Party has raised some very legitimate concerns.

This whole process of introducing this bill and then letting it languish on the Order Paper for the extended period of time that it did and bringing it forward in the dying hours of this session of this tired old Tory government has been nothing less than a disaster.

As the hon. member said it forced the committee into time restraints and constrictions which was all part of the game plan. The Tories do not want any democratic debate. They do not want to hear the opinions of the people across Canada in terms of their concerns over this legislation. They wanted to ram it through committee and ram it through the subcommittee dealing with it at report stage.

As the hon. member has said it was the government in the first whack that brought in over 50 amendments to a bill of 139 clauses. The government wanted to change 50 of them. By the time we got finished there was amendment upon amendment. The process was a shambles and the minister should be ashamed of himself for allowing that kind of process to take place.

If it had not been for the hard work of the opposition critics ensuring that each of those clauses was thoroughly debated and discussed and bringing to the table representation from the CRTC, the industry and interested organizations, and demanding they be heard because of the quantity of changes that had to be made, what else would have snuck through and weakened the legislation even further?

It is an absolute travesty that this government pulls this kind of subterfuge and then when it gets it into the House after one hour and a half of debate at report stage

of this bill this minister has the unmitigated gall to say that we are filibustering.

This minister knows full well that this House can no longer filibuster because the government has all the tools at its disposal to pull the plug at any time. All he was trying to do was obfuscate the process and say the opposition was filibustering just to make life difficult for the government and for the industry.

We cannot filibuster. The government has all the tools and it used those tools just the other day. The minister after one hour and a half of debate at report stage pulled the pin and brought in time allocation. As the member has said it is the thirtieth time this government has done this.

This government has used closure and time allocation more in this parliamentary session than in all the rest of the history of Parliament and Canada. It is an absolute abuse of the privilege of Parliament and this government has used it to the hilt.

I say it is a travesty to the democratic process that once again this minister through the government has used this procedure to shut down the type of democratic debate that should have taken place with this bill, that could have taken place with this bill but what he did not want to see take place.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT
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June 9, 1993

Mr. Lyle Dean MacWilliam (Okanagan -Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, I would just like to make a few comments directed to my colleague regarding the particular arguments he has just made.

As the critic for the New Democrats in the telecommunications area and one who saw this bill through its

Government Orders

passage, it is somewhat confusing to see the level of criticism that was levelled at the legislation from our Liberal colleagues when I just found out a short while ago that they will be supporting the legislation.

I do not know how they can have their cake and eat it too. The opposition critic during committee stage and other members in the House today have been so critical of the various components of the legislation, yet when push comes to shove they say they do not like it but are going to vote for it.

We have taken the position that we do not like the bill. There are many weaknesses in the bill and we feel that although it will pass because the government has the majority it is a matter of principle. The bill is fundamentally flawed and we should oppose that legislation for the record and fight for stronger legislation in the future.

My colleague was talking about the whole problem of deregulation. The major thrust of this bill is to drive forward the deregulatory process. We have seen Unitel apply for application to the long-distance market. The CRTC has passed that and is now skimming the cream off the profitable long-distance market. As a result of that the cost of long-distance telephone calls has dropped substantially.

Traditionally the profits from long-distance telephone calls would be used to offset the high cost of local services and keep those costs low so all Canadians had access to those services. Mr. Ronald Lipert, a spokesman for AGT, the Alberta Government Telephone, said in February of this year that long-distance rates have decreased by 40 per cent and increases in local rates are the other side of it. As long-distance rates come down, local rates can only go up.

I want to ask my colleague, when local rates go up does that not endanger the very principle of universality and affordable access that has been held dear in terms of our past telecommunications policy?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT
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June 9, 1993

Mr. Lyle Dean MacWilliam (Okanagan-Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, second and very quickly, a number of residents also from Okanagan-Shuswap are concerned about the proposed changes to the Unemployment Insurance Act putting more power in the hands of the employers. They call upon the House to reject the proposed amendments to the UI Act.

June 9, 1993

Topic:   PAKISTAN
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 9, 1993

Mr. Lyle Dean MacWilliam (Okanagan-Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the extra time given to present these petitions. A number of residents in the riding of Okanagan-Shuswap, particularly the areas of Vernon and Salmon Arm, are concerned about the impact of the North American free trade agreement on drug prices. They have called upon the House to reject the proposed North American free trade agreement and use the termination clause that is available to the government to reject the Canada-U.S. agreement.

Topic:   PAKISTAN
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 8, 1993

Mr. Lyle Dean MacWilliam (Okanagan -Shuswap) moved:

Motion No. 45.

That Bill C-62 be amended by deleting Clause 121.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT
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