Robert Hardy SMALL

SMALL, Robert Hardy

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Danforth (Ontario)
Birth Date
December 15, 1891
Deceased Date
October 5, 1976
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hardy_Small
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9ba3cbc0-772b-4a63-8e8e-116b51d77d7c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
advertising executive

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Danforth (Ontario)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Danforth (Ontario)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Danforth (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 73)


May 19, 1961

Mr. Small:

I shall probably be able to do that during the lunch hour, after the committee has adjourned. I shall look up Hansard and find the place where the statement was made. I know the hon. member made it.

May I call it one o'clock?

At one o'clock the committee adjourned.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT
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May 18, 1961

Mr. Small:

May I take my turn next time?

Progress reported.

Topic:   CAPE BRETON
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CHANGE IN SUBSIDIES
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May 18, 1961

Mr. Small:

I had almost given up hope that I would get on tonight. I am always glad to take the adjournment.

I covered a certain amount of the subject matter in connection with the Canadian National Railways when I spoke last but there are one or two things that I should like to clear up. The hon. member for Vancouver East touched on the matter of passenger service and dealt particularly with reservations. Without repeating what he said I can verify or corroborate everything that he said in regard to the matter of reservations and of having to wait and when you get to the train you find space had not been all booked up as you had been told. But the part that impresses me very much-and I think most hon. members have come to the same conclusion-is that the directors, whether it is the head of the board of directors or others, have come to the conclusion that they should try to fold up the passenger service in this country because it is not a paying proposition. Therefore, they are going to do their best to get rid of it. It is not a very easy thing to do because the minute a passenger line is slated for cancellation of course the members in that particular area are seized upon by their constituents and are asked to see that something is done about it through bringing it to the attention of the Minister of Transport.

Hon. members have been congratulating the minister all night. Probably the minister deserves our sympathy and condolences in his holding of this position because generally he is the whipping boy. He has to take the whip lash of every person in this house who has a grievance from his constituents, or from a person who was laid off by the railway. They come to the house and they confront him with the situation and he has to tell them that he will take it up with the president or the chairman of the board of directors. Then he comes back with the story that they have done their best but they could not avoid laying them off. They have to give them all a chance. This is what the Minister of Transport has to go through. It is not

only this minister but the previous minister. They all go through the very same thing. The pattern is the same. They have to go off and come back with a story which alleviates the situation. Peace reigns until the next time someone is laid off. The whole sum and substance of the problem is that the railway passenger service is not paying and the managers of the railway have to fold it up.

What I say is that if the passenger service is not paying, then the wisest thing to do is to terminate it. But if the railroads are going to continue it, then they should give service. It is no use running a service that is down at the heels and is on a hodge-podge basis. If they are going to give service they should give the very best service there is. I do not think they are even trying to do that. If they were trying to give service, then they would have the trains running on time and they would be giving of their best; they would be giving what could be called a high-class service.

I have spoken time after time in the house and tried to depict what took place at the Ottawa station and also at the Toronto station. Whenever I ran into what I called shabby or sloppy service I would bring it up. When I first started I tried to put a little humour into it and depict it as I saw it. I tried to make sure I was not being too severe, but what I did was just entertain hon. members, and they thought it was nothing more than good humour. But when I started to comment upon the board of directors who I thought should do something about it, well, then, I saw there was a little change. They did attempt to do something about the situation in Ottawa; but surely they did not have to wait for 20 years to try to do something about improving the service in Ottawa. I will say this for them. They have taken the trouble to so bring in the trains as to make it easier for the people to get off the trains and come to the station. They now do not have to walk so far. The reason why I took this attitude was that I had seen some passengers who could hardly walk; they were lame or handicapped, and there was no service to help them carry their grips. Some of the people were obviously infirm or had heart conditions. They were subject to the inconvenience of having to walk a long distance.

Then I checked into the way in which the freight and also the baggage were handled, in the stations. I do not blame men for trying to earn their living; they are doing what they are told. They took the baggage from the express and they put it on a lorry. What did they do with it? They ran it over to No. 3 bay and put it on another car, waiting there,

instead of taking a truck or a car as it comes in to the bay and then transferring it over to another vehicle. That would save a lot of time and not inconvenience the passengers or the people in the station. One fellow said to me, "Why do they not do it this way?" I looked at him and said, "My dear friend, do you not understand why they do not do it that way? It is quite obvious they do not do it that way because it is the simple and proper way. That is why they are not doing it that way".

Topic:   CAPE BRETON
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CHANGE IN SUBSIDIES
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May 16, 1961

Mr. R. H. Small (Danforih):

Mr. Speaker, when this bill was introduced and I read it I found that it had to do with an increase in the board of directors of Canadian National Railways, which brought back to my mind a former board of directors and the bringing of a motion in the house with respect to the then president of Canadian National Railways. The hon. member for Northwest Toronto at that time, later the member for Broadview, had some pertinent things to say about the president of Canadian National Railways, and I presume the introduction of this motion to increase the board of directors provides an opportunity to say something about this matter.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES REDUCTION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT EXTENDING APPLICATION OF REVISED RATES
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May 16, 1961

Mr. Small:

I thought I might get the debate ended by interjecting in this way.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES REDUCTION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT EXTENDING APPLICATION OF REVISED RATES
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