John Chester MACRAE

MACRAE, John Chester, M.C., E.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
August 29, 1912
Deceased Date
October 5, 1997
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chester_MacRae
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9aacb4d8-699a-4b45-937d-4ce774464e48&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 57)


May 21, 1971

Mr. MacRae:

I would dispute that. Some 25 per cent of those who were questioned responded. Was there much opposition to the survey? Rather surprisingly, there was not, although some may have felt that they should not have been written to and a few wrote back to say so. One reply that I remember in particular was that we should keep the army out of politics, and politics out of the army. But of course, Mr. Speaker, at head of the Department of National Defence we have a man who first of all must be elected to the House of Commons.

I would like to put on the record a brief summary respecting the response to the questions we asked. If the minister does not already know about this, I think he will find it of considerable interest. From an analysis of the replies of those who responded we were able to ascertain the following: There appears to be a substantial degree of disenchantment among armed forces personnel about the decision-making process concerning their working conditions.

On the whole, army respondents and non-commissioned respondents have expressed a higher degree of

disenchantment than navy and commissioned respondents. A majority of the respondents appear to be ready to accept the application of the principle of negotiation to the armed forces. However, although this principle of negotiation might not be applicable to all aspects of the armed forces, certain aspects of their working conditions are undoubtedly negotiable. These are pay and allowances, retirement and pension conditions and grievance procedures.

There is a definite lack of consensus among the respondents as to the necessity or even desirability of organizing armed forces personnel along union lines. However, it was felt there should be some mechanism established whereby negotiations with the government are conducted in a collective manner. This negotiating body should be formed within the armed forces, and definitely should not be in the hands of an outside group such as the Public Service Alliance.

Finally-and I concur emphatically in this-the armed forces should not, even in time of peace, have the right to strike. That is as it must be.

I find that I have only a moment or two left, Mr. Speaker, and what I have to say may not be very popular with one or two of my colleagues. I wish to thank the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Macdonald) for the assistance he has rendered to me in dealing with armed forces personnel problems. This debate has centred mainly on policy. I am more interested in trying to help with the personal problems of the men in the armed forces and their families. The Minister of National Defence is in the chamber, and I wish to say that I appreciate the consideration he has extended to me in the cases that I have brought to his attention.

I remember one particular case last fall. I do not know if the minister noticed at the time but I was very critical of him one day. The following day I went to him about a problem concerning a gentleman who was formerly in the forces. The minister's response was most generous to this ex-serviceman and it was something he and I appreciated. I wish to thank the minister publicly on the floor of the House for this.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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May 12, 1971

Has any department ever made a study of the health conditions, mortality tables, et cetera, of the Members of the House of Commons comparable to that carried out a few years ago in the British House of Commons?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   STUDY OF HEALTH AND MORTALITY RATES OF MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
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April 28, 1971

1. Was an employee of the Language Commissioner or any department employed to check bilingualism among Air Canada

April 28, 1971

Questions

employees in Ottawa on December 14, 1970 and, if so, on whose direct authority was this done?

2. Were tape recorders used without the knowledge of Air Canada employees being checked and, if so, were such tape recorders in plain view at all times of those being investigated?

3. What disciplinary action has been taken against those involved?

4. Have steps been taken to see that there is no recurrence of this either in Air Canada or in any other level of government?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   AIR CANADA-CHECK OF BILINGUALISM
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March 22, 1971

Is it the intention of the government to construct a federal building to house the post office and other federal departments in the Town of Oromocto, New Brunswick?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS-DESIGNATION OF SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES
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March 8, 1971

With respect to the answer to Question Number 203, given at page 2251 of Hansard January 11, 1971, what is the nature of the continuing reviews and how do they differ from a survey?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   FREDERICTON AIRPORT
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