Suzanne FORTIN-DUPLESSIS

FORTIN-DUPLESSIS, The Hon. Suzanne, B.A., Psy.-ped.

Parliamentary Career

September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Louis-Hébert (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Science and Technology) (October 15, 1987 - April 4, 1990)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Louis-Hébert (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Science and Technology) (October 15, 1987 - April 4, 1990)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Science (April 5, 1990 - May 7, 1991)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Indian Affairs and Northern Development) (May 8, 1991 - June 24, 1993)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for External Relations (May 8, 1991 - June 24, 1993)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Seniors) (May 8, 1993 - August 31, 1993)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs (September 1, 1993 - October 26, 1993)
January 14, 2009 - September 8, 1993
CPC
  Louis-Hébert (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs (September 1, 1993 - October 26, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 48)


June 8, 1993

Mrs. Suzanne Duplessis (Louis-Hebert):

Madam Speaker, today a coalition of Croatian and Bosnian women from Montreal, the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, the Federation des femmes du Quebec and the Civil Liberties Union tabled a petition with 13,000 signatures, asking the Canadian government to continue its efforts to help rape victims in Bosnia-Hercegovina and Croatia.

The coalition asks Canada to ensure that the international tribunal established by the UN to judge war crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia has an equal number of men and women and includes Canadian woman judges.

I fully support this admirable initiative and I want to ask the Secretary of State for External Affairs to do everything in her power to act on this request. We are talking about the lives of women and children who have suffered atrociously and we must do everything we can to stop further suffering.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   WAR CRIMES
Full View Permalink

May 31, 1993

Mrs. Suzanne Duplessis (Louis-Hebert):

Madam Speaker, the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women is celebrating its twentieth anniversary. Due to its tremendous credibility it continues to play a leading role with research and policy recommendations on matters of interest to women. For the first time in its history, the three most senior positions at the council are held by women from the black, native and francophone communities, reflecting the diversity of our country.

The government can look foward to more excellent research and insightful policy recommendations based on the NACSW's consultations with many different groups of Canadian women.

I invite everyone to join me in paying tribute to the NACSW for its excellent work and in wishing it every success for the future.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ADVISORY COUNCIL ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN
Full View Permalink

May 27, 1993

Mrs. Duplessis:

Cascade, of course, but I don't think Cascade is in transportation.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT
Full View Permalink

May 27, 1993

Mrs. Suzanne Duplessis (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for External Relations and to Minister of State (Seniors)):

Mr. Speaker, I welcome this opportunity today to speak on third reading of Bill C-115, the proposed free trade agreement with Mexico and the United States.

First of all, I would like to explain briefly what is happening in the world today. Because of today's highspeed communications and current developments, it is clear that the economies of countries throughout the world are closely linked. We can no longer live in isolation behind a wall of protectionism, because on one side, we have a united Europe, and on the other, the Pacific rim countries including Japan, China and Thailand, which also form a trading block.

According to the opposition, we should operate entirely on our own. I think this philosophy is obsolete, considering the positive results of the free trade agreement. I know what I am talking about, because towards the end of 1985, I sat with other government members on the joint committee on external affairs, chaired by the hon. member for London West, who is now a member of

cabinet. We travelled across the country, from province to province, and the same problem came up time and time again. When a company or an industry exported goods to the United States, it would often be hit with a tax, at the request of manufacturers of the same products in the U.S., who had lobbied their representatives in Congress or senators, and as a result, the industry was hit with a tax that was often applied retroactively.

People in the Maritimes, including fishermen, complained about the trouble they had selling their fish on the U.S. market. In Quebec, people complained about softwood lumber exports. All products manufactured in Canada-in Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Alberta or British Columbia-were often subject to taxes imposed by the U.S. government. When we proceeded with the free trade agreement, I believe we solved this problem, mainly by setting up a panel for dispute settlement.

I think this was quite an achievement. As a result, Canada's trade surplus with the United States increased 13.6 per cent last year, compared with the previous year, reaching a record $17.7 billion in 1992. This represents more than 200,000 new jobs and an increase of $15.1 billion in new direct foreign investment.

Mr. Speaker, this is really good news. People realize that this was necessary and that this is what Canada needs. Canada has a lot of primary products, and it also has a manufacturing sector, but it needs access to a much larger market.

Today, as we proceed with the NAFTA legislation, I would like to mention in this House that Quebec stands to gain under this agreement, like all the other provinces. In 1992, Quebec's trade with Mexico was worth $82.7 million, twice as much as in 1988. Manufactured products represent over 75 per cent of Quebec's annual exports to Mexico.

These exports include communications equipment, transportation equipment and newsprint. Three markets that are expanding at a tremendous rate.

The province has already established ties with Mexico through a series of bilateral agreements on a variety of items, from technical co-operation to cultural exchange.

May 27, 1993

Quebec has a solid reputation for its expertise in a number of sectors, including communications, telecommunications, engineering, pollution control and power transmission technology. The Quebec International Affairs Minister, the hon. John Ciaccia, had the following to say about the conclusions of the Quebec parliamentary commission on NAFTA and I quote:

Remarkably, none of the groups or individuals that submitted

briefs to the commission objected to free trade.

On the whole, NAFTA is good for Quebec because it maintains the advantages of the FTA and in many respects improved them. It extends to Mexico the main provisions of the FTA and opens up new markets in sectors that were hardly mentioned in the FTA.

I would like to say a few words about transportation equipment and services, mining operations and the services sector. With respect to transportation equipment and services, the need for Mexico to improve its infrastructure, in order to attract foreign investment and update its automobile fleet, will create a demand for goods and services in a sector where Quebec has the requisite know-how and resources. I would like to name two companies which are well known to all of you: Bombardier and-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT
Full View Permalink

May 27, 1993

Mrs. Duplessis:

Mr. Speaker, I would like to say to my colleague that, as a matter of fact, I am not aware of tariff barrier problems or impaired access to the American market. However, I still think NAFTA is necessary and that we cannot, as I said at the outset, surround Canada with walls and not engage in trade. I am convinced we will find solutions to these problems in the various provinces where they still exist.

As I could not complete my remarks earlier, I should like to take this opportunity to bring to the attention of my colleague a front page newsreport in today's newspaper Le Devoir by Brigitte Morissette entitled "A success story likely to cheer up Canadians".

The Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources is in Mexico these days. He is accompanied by people from all across Canada who sell services or products. He arranged a meeting with the governor of a specific region in Mexico where they have water main problems.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT
Full View Permalink