Charles Hibbert TUPPER

TUPPER, The Hon. Sir Charles Hibbert, P.C., K.C., K.C.M.G., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Pictou (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
August 3, 1855
Deceased Date
March 30, 1927
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Hibbert_Tupper
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=96d0ba80-7fd6-4865-8545-abba4a2e357f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
editor, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

June 20, 1882 - January 15, 1887
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
February 22, 1887 - February 3, 1891
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (June 1, 1888 - June 6, 1891)
June 18, 1888 - February 3, 1891
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (June 1, 1888 - June 6, 1891)
March 5, 1891 - April 24, 1896
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (June 1, 1888 - June 6, 1891)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (June 16, 1891 - November 24, 1892)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (December 5, 1892 - December 12, 1894)
  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada (December 21, 1894 - January 5, 1896)
June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (May 1, 1896 - July 8, 1896)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 52)


July 6, 1904

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER asked :

(a.) Have the following, or any of them, and which of them, if any, been dismissed from the service of the Intercolonial Railway ?

1. Alexander Stewart, section foreman at Linwood, Antigonish ?

2. John Chisholm, section foreman, Heath-erton, Antigonish ?

3. Finlay Chisholm, section foreman, James River, Antigonish ?

(b.) If dismissed, was any Investigation made prior to dismissal, and what was its nature ? .

(c.) How long were these men in the service of the government and what was the record of each for efficiency and conduct ?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   C123 COMMONS
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May 13, 1904

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER.

1 shall come to that. The hon. gentleman hedged ou the question. He made it almost too apparent if the opposition as he said-[DOT] and this I think is fairly representing his argument-were sincere in regard to the interests of labour in connection with the matter now under consideration, they should support some general legislation. The whole trouble was with the Canadian Pacific Railway ; the whole trouble was at large, at any rate, and I do not think the hon. gentleman will dispute what I am now saying, that he is going to support this contract straight through from beginning to end, he is going to vote down every amendment whether it is in the interest of labour or not.

Topic:   G.T.P. RY-ALIENS AS SURVEYORS.
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May 13, 1904

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER.

Tile member for Vancouver (Mr. Smith) dragged me into this discussion by a reference and I would like to say a word or two on the subject now [DOT] before the committee. What struck me as very extraordinary is that during the very interesting discussion on some 'legal questions arising out of the construction of this contract last night, members of the government were most careful to say that although it was made clear to the committee that the company had one idea as to the construction of a clause and the Minister of Justice had the other, there had been no communication whatever between the company and the government on this vexed question ; that the government held to its idea and would stick to it, and that no amendment on that subject would be considered for a moment by the government. To-night in connection with a question that is not covered by any clause of the contract but which concerns very directly the labour interests of this country, the government has been [DOT] most careful apparently to consult with Mr. Hays and has been satisfied by the reply of Mr. Hays that everything was lovely and that nothing serious was intended in regard to the labour interests of this country. Well, that is all right for pastmasters like the Postmaster General, but I was surprised to find the member for Vancouver (Mr. Smith) coming

iu under the umbrella out of the rain and attempting to support the government on a question that concerns directly the interest that he is supposed particularly to represent as distinguished from the interests of the Liberal party.

Topic:   G.T.P. RY-ALIENS AS SURVEYORS.
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May 13, 1904

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER.

That was a long time ago, and conditions were very different. The hon. gentleman knows that as well as I do. But supposing that we did all wrong, then if he is a fair and

sincere representative of the interests that elected him to this parliament what on earth have the shortcomings of the Conservative party to do with him, or how do they fortify him in opposing the interests of labour in a question of this kind? Why should he fall back on that old heresy of : Ton should

leave this to general legislation. Now is the time to secure the interests of labour ; and the interests of Canadians in connection with the huge expenditure which is involved in the ratification of this supplementary contract, now or never. The hon. gentleman knows that as well as I do, I can understand the Liberal position, even though I think it is weak, even though I think the interests of the public are not safeguarded, but I do quarrel with the position of the hon. gentleman from Vancouver Island (Mr. Smith) whu got into this parliament as a representative of the labour interests, sheltering himself under these general arguments of expediency on the part of the Liberal party. That is my quarrel that is where we differ and it is only necessary to say a word in order to expose him, so that he must perforce take shelter under the Liberal party, and stand or fall as they do by the position they take in regard to this question. Consequently I say in connection with this that it is no use to hark back to the conditions of an entirely different contract and a different set of conditions in regard to the labour market and in regard to confederation generally. The government appreciate the ground taken. It is idle to deny after the speech of the Postmaster General, that the interests of Canadian engineers and Canadian labour should be safeguarded in a vast expenditure like this in the construction of public works in our own land.

They appreciate that and though their interests are not safeguarded in this contract they dare not for a moment amend the contract, knowing that the ultimatum has been pronounced by the Grand Trunk Railway Company. They have to take that contract as it stands ipsissima verba without any alteration whatever. But, they appreciate the force of public opinion and they tell us that the matter was mentioned to the Grand Trunk Railway Company and that they have reason to believe and expect that when all these very serious statements have been categorically made, names and addresses given, the Grand Trunk Railway Company will perhaps explain. They have not explained yet. They hope that that condition of affairs does not exist. What is the remedy ? That is the proposition that is before us. The government have been helpless, existing by the grace of the people who are over them. This corporation hold them in the hollow of their hand. That it as clear as the sun at noon-day. That is the answer of the government to an ambitions people. This is the government of a young race of engineers, of workman, and of all classes growing up with a great

and proper idea of the resources and future of this country. The government hope that Mr. Hays will make this all right. They dare not and they cannot tell the committee that, if Mr. Hays is not in a position to give a satisfactory answer to the questions which have been put from this side of the House i;\ the interest of Canadian labour, in the interest of Canadian engineers and in the interest of the graduates of universities in this country, the government will see that justice is done under these [DOT] circumstances. That is absolutely clear. It is pitiable, it is absolutely contemptible and yet the so-called representative of labour weakly attempts to back them up in that business.

Topic:   G.T.P. RY-ALIENS AS SURVEYORS.
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May 13, 1904

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER.

I prophesy, from the remarks he has made, from the general course he has taken, he will sink or swim with the government of the day. He is no longer a labour representative, he knows as well as I do that he could not return to this House as a representative of the labour interests ; he knows as well as I do that a large part of that interest will not support him again, and that he has to appeal to the Liberal vote in his riding.

Topic:   G.T.P. RY-ALIENS AS SURVEYORS.
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