William Rees BROCK

BROCK, William Rees

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Toronto Centre (Ontario)
Birth Date
February 14, 1836
Deceased Date
November 1, 1917
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Rees_Brock
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=94be4e10-39c3-40c5-a2fd-66bb4c8d2ae3&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman

Parliamentary Career

November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Toronto Centre (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 118)


August 8, 1904

Mr. BROCK.

A reduction of something like one-quarter of one per cent.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF COMMIS SION.
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August 8, 1904

Mr. BROCK.

There are various ways of selling in the United States. A manufacturer sells goods to the wholesale trade at one price, and to the retail trade at another price. Probably they will sell three times as much to the retail as to the wholesale trade. The large departmental stores in the United States buy at one price and a large wholesale jobber in New York at another price, perhaps the wholesale jobber will get a special discount of 10 per cent. I go to the United States and buy from the manufacturer at a certain price. A large firm in New York will buy two days later and get a special discount of 10 per cent. But they make the market value in the United States without the discount. On which am I to pay duty ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF COMMIS SION.
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August 8, 1904

Mr. BROCK.

If a large retail merchant in Toronto goes to the United States and pays 10 per cent more than I do he will claim that the goods were slaughtered to me and the penalties may be enforced against me. There is a difference between the wholesale jobbing and the retail trade, that is getting to be day by day more important in this country.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF COMMIS SION.
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August 8, 1904

Mr. BROCK.

You are creating a new state of things by the dumping clause for which you are taking a great deal of credit. What the country wants to understand is tow you are going to apply the dumping clause. I myself, with my limited knowledge of business, see great difficulties ahead, and I can see ways in which the schemer, the man who wants to evade the law, can do so. dt is going to be a difficult matter to arrive at what is really the fair thing. We know what the honest thing is, but in what way will the minister arrive at what is to be a fair thing to all the people in this country. I am engaged in a class of business that is [DOT]very conspicuous for the great differences iin values, for the very same articles in a (Very short time. If I import a thousand pieces of goods at 6 cents and some one else had imported six cases a short time before and paid nine cents, then because he has paid what was a fair value three or four days ahead of the time I purchased, am I going to be subjected to all these penalties if I manage a few days later on to buy the goods at a lower price ? These are things that are happening every day and I think .this is a matter that will require to be looked into very carefully before you impose penalties.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF COMMIS SION.
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August 8, 1904

Mr. BROCK.

A great quantity of these *silks do come from Germany but large quantities come from France and other European countries that pay no surtax. I contend tha|t the silk should be manufactured in bond, and that those who do such a small business that they cannot afford to pay

bonding charges had better not be in the business. You will have no trouble with the large manufacturers in Montreal and Toronto ; your difficulty will come from those small manufacturers such as we know in the trade 'who keep these little sweating shops, do a small business at a small expense and pay small wages. A large manufacturer in Montreal told me that these little sweating shops manufacturing special articles are really ruining the manufacture of the better class of goods. Any manufacturer who is big enough to import goods ought be big enough to pay expenses of making them in bond. I trust the Customs Department will make careful regulations or else the trade of this country will be seriously injured by the importation of large quantities of silk alleged to be for neckties, but which will never go into the manufacture of neckties at all. I see also that in this resolution you except blankets, flannels, bedcovers, and counterpanes, from the regular rate of duty. Why should you do that ? The manufacture of blankets in Canada is one of our most satisfactory industries and yet the importation of an undesirable class of blankets is increasing largely. We are keeping out diseased immigrants, but here we are allowing goods to come into this country that are really diseased. The poorest stuff is put into these so-called blankets ; there is not a particle of clean wool or clean cotton in them ; they are made of rubbish and they are sold to the poorer people in the Northwest. The Doukhobors wear them and use them as covering for their beds, when you had far better let them use good woollen blankets and not encourage them to use this rubbish. I do not see why you should allow them in at a lower rate of duty than good honest woollen goods. Again, we can manufacture flannels in .this country and why should they be excepted ? Why try to injure them by leaving that item in ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF COMMIS SION.
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