Robert Francis GREEN

GREEN, The Hon. Robert Francis

Parliamentary Career

May 30, 1912 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Kootenay (British Columbia)
December 17, 1917 - October 2, 1921
UNION
  Kootenay West (British Columbia)
October 3, 1921 - October 4, 1921
CON
  Kootenay West (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 18)


April 22, 1920

Mr. GREEN:

I was paired with the hon. member for Victoria and Albert (Mr. White). Had I voted I would have voted against the amendment.

(The list of Pains is furnished by the Chief Whips.)

Messrs.

Borden, Sir Robert, Foster, Sir George, White, Sir Thomas, Reid, Hon. J. D.,

MoMaster,

Fielding,

Jacobs,

Kennedy, W. C.,

Burrell,

Mewburn,

Doherty,

McQuarrie,

Lal'or,

Kemp, Sir Edward, Charlton,

Man ion,

Tudhope,

Green,

Wallace,

Whidden,

Motion agreed versed, and Bill passed.

On

House

Beland,

Mareil (Bonaventure), Brouillard,

McCrea,

Fournier,

McOoig, .

Lesage,

Proulx,

White (Victoria), Dech&ne,

Etihier.

to on same division reread the third time, and

On motion of Right Hon. Mr. Doherty the adjourned at 12.30 a.m. (Friday.)

Friday, April 23, 1920.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   BILL TO CONFIRM AGREEMENT WITH THE COMPANY.
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October 23, 1919

Mr. GREEN:

I was paired with the hon. member for Victoria, Alta., (Mr. White). Had I voted I would have voted against the amendment.

Main motion agreed to on the same division reversed, and Bill read the second time.

On motion of Hon. J. D. Reid the House went into committee on the Bill, Mr. Boivin in the Chair.

On section 1:

Topic:   GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM.
Subtopic:   BILL, PROVIDING FOR THE ACQUISITION OF THE SYSTEM BY THE GOVERNMENT.
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June 23, 1919

Mr. GREEN:

It would be a large undertaking, it is true, but a great part of that highway is already built, and all that would be needed would be connecting links. In that way, the Government would not only furnish the money but would have control of the expenditure. The people as a whole are furnishing the money, and this Government is responsible for its expenditure. I will not say that if I cannot get the Government to see eye to eye with me as to the method in which to deal with this matter, I am going to oppose the resolution, because I believe that the Government are perfectly right in undertaking to furnish a large sum of money for the building of highways in Canada, East and West. I trust that the Bill itself will contain a provision for the Government to undertake the building of that highway themselves under their own officials and with the money of the people.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   GOOD IJOADS.
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June 23, 1919

Mr. GREEN:

There is a West other than Middle West. If the Middle West wants railways, the Far West wants wagon roads and highways. British Columbia is just as much in need of highways as the Middle West is in need of railways. I am not particularly enamoured of the method in which the money provided under this resolution is to be expended. For myself, I would prefer to see the Government build a national highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   GOOD IJOADS.
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April 25, 1919

Mr. GREEN:

I desire to say a few words on this Bill, not because it affects Western 'Canada, but because the introduction of undesirables is a matter that affects the whole Dominion. This is a period of reconstruction. We have heard a great deal in the last few months concerning reconstruction, and I wish to congratulate the Government that in this Bill they are preparing to ensure that we shall get a better class of immigrants in Canada. Perhaps we in the West may be in a position to speak with more knowledge on this question than people in the East. Possibly Western Canada offers greater advantages to farmers, in that they have less trouble in breaking up new lands and establishing themselves upon the land. In the province from which I come the natural resources are not only very great, but are very easily accessible, and the climate appeals to people coming into a new country. In the past we have experienced difficulties in regard to Oriental immigration. I am not going to deal so much with the question of Oriental immigration, because it has been threshed out in this House and by the people from time to time and is fairly well understood. The hon. member from Montreal (Mr. Jacobs) yesterday eulogized Sir Clifford Sifton on his immigration policy. In the main I endorse that eulogy of Sir Clifford Sifton, but I want to tell the hon. member that Sir *Clifford Sifton informed me himself that he made a mistake when he brought the Douk-hobors to Canada. No one who

4 p.m. knows those people can deny that they are sober, industrious and hard working. But they live in communities. Their families all live together, eat together, and have their buildings together,

and they do not allow their children to attend the schools provided by the country, nor do they comply with the necessary regulations for the registration of births, deaths and marriages. They speak their own language, and as a class they are not even educated in their mother tongue. I do not think we would ever be able to assimilate these people so long as they are allowed to remain in these communities, and we should not allow the Doubhobors, Hutterites and Mennonites or any people of that sort to come into Canada and live under their present customs. If we are going to build up a united Canada we must have people whom we can assimilate and who eventually will join the family of Canadian life. The people I have mentioned are not of that kind and I wish it were possible in this legislation not only to debar any more from coming in, but-and I hope the Government may see its way to make this possible-to deport those who are living in communities, as well as interned aliens, and to send them back to the countries from which them came, Russia or wherever else it may be, where they will be more at home among their fellowmen. In this reconstruction period 1 think we should see to it that the necessary restrictions will be provided so that we may not be flooded with an influx of people whom it will take generations to get rid of or to assimilate. I do not think that any one should advocate the giving of the privileges of Canadian citizenship to interned alien enemies belonging to countries that vve have been fighting and with which we are still technically at war. These men who were interned were not peaceable, law-abiding citizens. They were interned for some breach of the laws of the land; and at this moment, it seems preposterous that we should advocate, just because peace is about to be declared, that they be taken in as full citizens of Canada. One of the great troubles in the past has been the laxity of the naturalization law.

I do not know whether they have experienced any trouble in the East, but in the. West we have had traffic in naturalization papers, and I venture to say that it is not all over yet. Under the new law, however, this matter will be more easily dealt with than in the past. Under the old law a man was only required to live two years in the country, and if he made his application and it was vouched for by some one, even if proper notice had not been given to the public, he was accorded the full rights of citizenship. Under this Bill he must have five years' residence, and there are many

restrictions in the Bill to-day that were not in the old law. I wish to again congratulate the Government on the introduction of this Bill, and I hope that when it is completed it will not only keep out of Canada those aliens who are not desirable, but will enable us to deport those who have proved to be undesirable while living amongst us.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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