Steve BUTLAND

BUTLAND, Steve, B.A., M.Ed.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario)
Birth Date
March 26, 1941
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Butland
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=9215f31c-20f9-48ea-b0c0-7ecd25041e42&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
school principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 74 of 76)


May 9, 1989

Mr. Steve Butland (Sault Ste. Marie):

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to draw the attention of the Government once again to the crisis of deteriorating roadways, bridges and sewer systems across Canada. One example that portrays this crisis is the fact that more than eight million Canadians live in municipalities that provide no sewage treatment whatsoever.

Municipalities do not have the tax base to address this issue alone but are willing to raise their share of one-third of the cost as are all provincial Governments. The federal Government is not, despite veiled promises made from time to time before the Budget. In the meantime, both the deterioration and the price escalates. It is now $15 billion.

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has a concrete proposal endorsed by its 1,200-plus members which would help clean up our environment, create

60,000 good paying jobs, reduce the deficit through tax revenue and rebuild the infrastructure of Canada. I call on the Government to enact one positive initiative out of a totally negative and regressive Budget and allocate the $600 million generated from tax increases on gasoline to this plan. It would be a small step toward addressing the issue, but at least it would be a positive step which would improve the quality of life of all Canadians.

Topic:   MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   COST OF SEWAGE TREATMENT
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April 18, 1989

Mr. Steve Butland (Sault Ste. Marie):

Madam Speaker, I welcome the opportunity to debate this legislation, in all likelihood being the last Member to speak at this stage of the Bill. I must admit that I will stray somewhat from the topic, as I did this morning in my questioning, because I am not an expert on the CASB. However, I feel somewhat knowledgeable about the status of deregulation.

I suggest that the Government was ill prepared for deregulation, and myriad newspaper clippings indicate that it was indeed ill prepared. Let me just cite one of the hundreds of clippings: "Ex Pilot Claims Some U.S. Airlines Prefer Profit to Safety". I suggest that is coming true in Canada as well.

I believe the Government is as ill prepared for deregulation as it was ill prepared for the Free Trade Agreement. It is most unfortunate that the skies will not be any safer today than they were yesterday, nor will they be any safer tomorrow as a result of this new multimodal investigation agency. That is what is unfortunate about all of this.

Our Party welcomes the Bill in principle, but that is not the crux of the problem. The Bill does not solve the crux of the problem, which is deregulation. Deregulation has not lived up to some of the billings of the Government despite the warnings given by everyone else.

Cost cutting is the bottom line. I refer once again to northern communities that have suffered the loss of jet service. There is no competition in the northern communities. We have been subject to fare increases which, as I indicated this morning, have risen four times in four months in my constituency. It costs almost $500 now to fly return 450 miles from Sault Ste. Marie to Ottawa. It is cheaper for me to fly from Toronto to Vancouver. It is almost cheaper for me to fly to Europe than to go from Sault Ste. Marie to Ottawa. I think that is a shame.

Safety is decreasing at an alarming rate each day. The Radar Modernization Program, of which the Government is extremely proud I am told, is already outdated. I have it from good sources that it is not compatible with the American system and the Canadian radar cannot track some American airplanes flying over northern

Transportation Accident Investigation Board

communities. There are some 6,000 flights daily over my community and certainly that causes us great concern.

Certain airports in northern communities have been reclassified from category 6 to category 5, with no appreciable difference in the aircraft, resulting in five or six people losing fire-fighting jobs. The Dryden tragedy is an example of the safety concern. A stewardess who perished on that aircraft suggested to her husband that she was prepared to quit in the very near future if things did not change. Less competition has resulted in a loss of 14 employees in my constituency in the past several months. Employees of Canadian partners will soon be out of work. Air Canada shut down a ticket office. One might say that this only affected two employees, so what, they can move to Toronto. I am reminded of the U.I. program. I suppose people from northern Ontario and other regions of Canada can move to Toronto get jobs. People who have worked for 15 or 19 years for Air Canada do not want to move to Toronto. They want to remain in their communities.

We will accept the new legislation after it is further discussed because we know the board will be a busy body. It will probably be too busy. It is our desperate hope that it will not be busy.

Daily we read horror stories in newspapers across Canada. Just a couple of weeks ago, our local paper had an article saying that passengers had described the Convair as ready for the bone yard and rickety, and Mr. McKnight, who just recently resigned from his Air Ontario post, said that these planes were built in the late 1950s and they have a high level of vibration. That is of grave concern to everyone in northern Canada.

We suggest that the airways are no safer today. We are concerned about ground safety as well. I am not sure that the investigation board should not look into the Minister's Department to see about its status.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION BOARD
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April 18, 1989

Mr. Butland:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have a question. I excerpted a few words from the hon. gentleman's speech, and he spoke of human mistakes and equipment failure. I would like to point out a couple of facts in air safety that I do not think have been divulged in the past few days of debate. One of them is the Government's radar modernization program. I am told by reliable sources that in the case of American-Cana-dian skies the Canadian software is not compatible with the American aircraft, causing a great deal of extra concern with regard to air safety.

Second, with regard to the reclassification of northern airports across this country, the difference of two feet, on the old measurement scale, can result in a decrease of five firefighters in my particular constituency. I believe it is the same for 16 other airports across the northern part of Canada. My question is very specific. The principle of the Board, I think our Party agrees with, but will the Member not accept the fact that the present government policies of cut-backs exacerbates the problem. That is the real problem rather than the creation of the safety Board.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION BOARD
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April 18, 1989

Mr. Butland:

Mr. Speaker, I want to make a few comments just to reinforce what my colleague has suggested about deregulation. My comments are pertinent, perhaps, and quite parochial nevertheless since there are other communities across northern Canada that have suffered and will continue to suffer certain ills. The first is a loss of jet service to many of these communities and the concomitant consequences of that. The second is the reduction in safety, which is proven on a regular basis. The third is the issue that my hon. colleague just mentioned. The return fare from my

constituency to Ottawa has gone up four times in the past four months. It is presently $460 return, I suppose at the taxpayers' expense. Nevertheless, if one compares that to the Toronto to Florida fare, which is something like $100 return, it is a result of this market-driven economy and a direct result of deregulation.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION BOARD
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April 13, 1989

Mr. Steve Butland (Sault Ste. Marie):

Mr. Speaker, I want to draw the attention of the House to a $14,000 advertisement on page A-ll of today's The Globe and Mail. This advertisement contains a thoroughly repugnant picture of an infant shackled by a ball and chain. The text below this tasteless picture concerns the need to cut Canada's deficit.

Last November during the federal election campaign this country saw corporate Canada finance the free trade agenda of the Conservative Party through an unprecedented amount of advertising. Now that free trade is an unfortunate fact of Canadian life, it appears that corporate Canada is continuing to act as front men for Conservative policies. While our Parties may disagree on just how the deficit should be addressed, I think all Members would agree that ads such as this are distasteful, inappropriate and unacceptable to all Canadians. I call upon the Government to make this known to its supporters.

Topic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Subtopic:   ADVERTISING PRACTICES
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