Irvin William STUDER

STUDER, Irvin William

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Swift Current--Maple Creek (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
November 15, 1900
Deceased Date
June 1, 1997
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irvin_Studer
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=8ad8ce5e-ad31-45d7-8cb4-525e31ac7c67&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Maple Creek (Saskatchewan)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Swift Current--Maple Creek (Saskatchewan)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Swift Current--Maple Creek (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 101)


January 28, 1958

Mr. Irvin Sluder (Swift Current-Maple Creek):

I should like to direct a question

to the Minister of Public Works which has to do with facilitating entrance to this building. In the minister's absence perhaps the question should be directed to his parliamentary assistant.

Would the Minister of Public Works, as an employment measure, give consideration to the feasibility of constructing a passage or tunnel from the sidewalk level in front of the main entrance to these parliament buildings, to pass through and under the driveway and peace tower stairway and connect with the basement entrance, to facilitate employees and members of parliament entering without encountering the daily traffic hazards in front of this building?

Topic:   PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PEDESTRIAN ACCESS TUNNEL UNDER TOWER
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January 25, 1958

Mr. Studer:

I wonder whether it would be in order to make this suggestion in connection with the cost of producing commodities. I think the department has a ready-made organization in existence for determining such costs in connection with all commodities. I refer to the experimental farm system all across Canada. There is no province I know of in which they are not established, except perhaps Newfoundland. They have their costs established on various commodities.

Just as an illustration, in 1956 the average cost of producing wheat on summer fallow at 10 illustrative station farms amounted to $23.22 per acre. This is indicative as an illustration of their consideration of costs and could be held to be reliable; and I think they are. That pertains to all farm commodities at least to some extent, because one or other station is specializing in or producing

3812 HOUSE OF

Agricultural Products-Price Stabilization almost every commodity. I think we have an established basis from which to begin and which can be used to determine what the costs are in establishing your floor price or your other costs.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
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January 25, 1958

Mr. Studer:

I would like to ask a question of the minister as follows: With the passing of this bill am I right in assuming that it does not preclude the possibility of another

bill being presented to provide deficiency payments to the grain growers of western Canada?

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
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January 25, 1958

Mr. Irvin Sluder (Swiff Curreni-Maple Creek):

I should like to inquire if it is the intention of the Minister of Trade and Commerce to recommend the appointment of a transport controller to work in conjunction with the wheat board to facilitate the equalization of grain deliveries at all points in western Canada.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORT
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January 25, 1958

Mr. Studer:

Mr. Chairman, I do not wish to labour the point concerning the variation in price for different grades in different commodities and how those prices affect the floor price or how the floor price establishes the basis for other grades in any commodity. However, I thought you might be interested in the last egg receipt we received at our farm.

This is a statement from the Swift Current cooperative creamery association dated January 10, just about 10 days ago. The statement lists grade A extra large at 28 cents, that is to the producers, and A large is exactly the same price, 28 cents. There is no variation there. Then grade A medium, which is the next size, is shown at 23 cents and grade B is shown at 21 cents. The statement covers a small lot of 60 dozen eggs which we brought into town at that time. It would appear that there is not sufficient distinction, or that the support price established does not guarantee that the prices for the various grades will follow proportionately. There is no variation in price on this statement between grade A extra large and grade A large, and then there is a 5 cent drop to grade A medium, which is the common size in commerce throughout the country.

I thought perhaps we should give some consideration to that and perhaps establish floor prices for the various grades of a commodity rather than for just the top grades, especially for a commodity like eggs.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
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