John Angus MACLEAN

MACLEAN, The Hon. John Angus, P.C., O.C., D.F.C., C.D., B.Sc., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
May 15, 1914
Deceased Date
February 15, 2000
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angus_MacLean
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=89ac7ae7-ddc1-4da4-b856-57690240d2c4&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
airplane pilot, farmer, flying instructor, test pilot

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1951 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
  • Postmaster General (July 18, 1962 - August 8, 1962)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader (December 5, 1972 - December 19, 1974)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader (December 5, 1972 - December 19, 1974)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Assistant Deputy House Leader (January 1, 1975 - January 1, 1976)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 491)


October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

Any government that suggests such a thing of course has its suggestions turned aside by the argument that urbanization is inevitable and automatic; that we will have most of our population living in large urban centres in a very few years. They say it is true because of technology. Well, Mr. Speaker, we should not be slaves to technology-

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Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

-it is obvious that this occasion is non-partisan. Therefore in my remarks I will try to follow the trend that has been set.

My first words are to express my appreciation to colleagues in my party who have stood aside to give me the opportunity to speak on this occasion. I must tell you, Mr. Speaker, that it must be obvious to anyone that when our whip asks someone to step aside, that person has no other choice but to do so. Since I

was given that privilege, I discovered by accident that it was 25 years ago, to the day, that I made my maiden speech in the House of Commons.

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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

It is a heartwarming coincidence for me that I made my first speech on October 18, 1951, having been first elected to this august Chamber on June 25 of that year, together with my desk mate, the hon. member for Brandon-Souris (Mr. Dinsdale).

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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

I think it is false for us to assume that all the values of life can be measured in dollars and cents, or in economists' graphs. There are other things in life that are more important, that are equally important. The material side of life is only a prerequisite to enjoying life. 1 will quote again from page 70 of Mr. Schumacher's book as follows:

The conventional wisdom of what is now taught as economics by-passes the poor, the very people for whom development is really needed. The economics of giantism and automation is a left-over of nineteenth century conditions and nineteenth century thinking and it is totally incapable of solving any of the real problems of today. An entirely new system of thought is needed, a system based on attention to people, not primarily attention to goods-the goods will look after themselves! It could be summed up in the phrase, "production by the

[Mr. MacLean.)

masses, rather than mass production". What was impossible, however, in the nineteenth century, is possible now. And what was in fact-if not necessarily at least understandably-neglected in the nineteenth century in unbelievably urgent now. That is, the conscious utilization of our enormous technological and scentific potential for the fight against misery and human degradation-a fight in intimate contact with actual people, with individuals, families, small groups, rather than states and other anonymous abstractions. And this presupposes a political and organizational structure that can provide this intimacy.

I feel, Mr. Speaker, that one of the greatest mistakes economists ever made is that they treated agriculture and our soil as just another economic value. It is more than that. Agriculture is more than an industry. Any nation that over urbanizes and neglects its soil, and has a large percentage of its people unconscious of the fact that they are part of the web of life, is in for trouble.

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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

Or the mother, as the case may be.

Having said that, I plan to leave this place tomorrow, of course with many regrets. I remember the friendships I have made here over the years. I hope I shall have the opportunity to come back to visit my friends on the Hill.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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