John Angus MACLEAN

MACLEAN, The Hon. John Angus, P.C., O.C., D.F.C., C.D., B.Sc., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
May 15, 1914
Deceased Date
February 15, 2000
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angus_MacLean
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=89ac7ae7-ddc1-4da4-b856-57690240d2c4&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
airplane pilot, farmer, flying instructor, test pilot

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1951 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
  • Postmaster General (July 18, 1962 - August 8, 1962)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Minister of Fisheries (June 21, 1957 - April 21, 1963)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader (December 5, 1972 - December 19, 1974)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Malpeque (Prince Edward Island)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader (December 5, 1972 - December 19, 1974)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Assistant Deputy House Leader (January 1, 1975 - January 1, 1976)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 491)


October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

I want to speak now for a few moments of other changes I have seen, some of which I am happy with, and some of which make me less happy.

One of the changes that I have seen over the last 25 years is the rapid urbanization of our country. I realize that this urbanization is not necessarily due to the vital growth of urban centres but also represents, on the other side of the scale, a hemorrhage of the life's blood of the small towns in rural Canada.

I regret that our development as a country has been so uneven. Over the last 25 years there has been a lusty but sometimes malignant growth of our urban centres, especially of areas based on the rapid exploitation of non-renewable resources. It is obvious, of course, that a civilization, a culture, or an economy based on non-renewable resources is, by definition, non-renewable itself. I regret the prodigal squandering of our natural resources which should be the precious capital of a civilization as long as it lasts, for a continuing civilization and culture must be based on renewable resources to be renewable themselves.

Of course I am probably biased in this matter because by birth and a long life of experience I am a country man, vividly

October 18, 1976

aware of the fact that we as humans are part of the web of life and that, if we forget that fact, we forget it at our peril.

I believe that this uneven development of our country is not entirely unavoidable or inevitable. Much of it has been caused by bias, often unconscious bias, in the whole apparatus of government at every level, based on the false premise that was instilled perhaps 40 or 50 years ago but which is no longer valid, namely, that the good life can be obtained only in an urban setting. Experience has proved the opposite to be true.

There was a time some decades ago when modern conveniences, modern communications and so on, were the prerogatives of the urban area, but that is no longer true. Technology has advanced to the point where those who live in rural Canada can enjoy all the modern conveniences, if they can afford them, that the urban dweller can, and have the joy and benefit and recreational facilities-and I mean recreational in the best sense of the word-and the experience, of living in the country. I believe that the highest and best quality of life is achievable more easily in rural Canada and in the small towns than it is in the large urban centres.

I do not think it is inevitable that modern technology forces us to the large urban conglomeration of society. This has come about, I think, because of a worship of giantism and an over selling of the benefits of large scale. In the process the human element has been lost, and I do not think it is good that that should be the case. I have from time to time been talking along this line over 25 years and, as far as I can tell, nobody has been listening, but as I said, I found by accident that I made my maiden speech in this Chamber exactly 25 years ago today.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

-it is obvious that this occasion is non-partisan. Therefore in my remarks I will try to follow the trend that has been set.

My first words are to express my appreciation to colleagues in my party who have stood aside to give me the opportunity to speak on this occasion. I must tell you, Mr. Speaker, that it must be obvious to anyone that when our whip asks someone to step aside, that person has no other choice but to do so. Since I

was given that privilege, I discovered by accident that it was 25 years ago, to the day, that I made my maiden speech in the House of Commons.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

It is a heartwarming coincidence for me that I made my first speech on October 18, 1951, having been first elected to this august Chamber on June 25 of that year, together with my desk mate, the hon. member for Brandon-Souris (Mr. Dinsdale).

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

There are others, of course, such as the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles), the hon. member for Nanaimo-Cowichan-The Islands (Mr. Douglas) and, I think, maybe the leader of the Creditiste party, who perhaps have served longer terms in the House of Commons than I have, but not continuously.

I would like to speak now of other changes than those among my immediate circle of friends, and I speak to you all as friends because in this institution we make friendships that are life long, across party lines as well as within them.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 18, 1976

Mr. MacLean:

In my humble opinion we have to develop a way of life ever conscious that we are ourselves part of the web of life and that we cannot escape that fact. I would like again to quote from Mr. Schumacher's book, "Small is Beautiful":

While many theoreticians-who may not be too closely in touch with real life- are still engaging in the idolatory of large size, with practical people in the actual world there is a tremendous longing and striving to profit, if at all possible, from the convenience, humanity, and manageability of smallness. This, also, is a tendency which anyone can easily observe for himself.

Today we suffer from the almost universal idolatory of giantism. It is therefore necessary to insist on the virtue of smallness. In my view small is beautiful.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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