Gerald William BALDWIN

BALDWIN, Gerald William, O.C., Q.C., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Peace River (Alberta)
Birth Date
January 18, 1907
Deceased Date
December 16, 1991
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ged_Baldwin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=88de9baa-8839-401f-9aa2-55522b62d47f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (August 17, 1962 - February 6, 1963)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
  • Official Opposition House Leader (July 27, 1968 - September 20, 1973)
  • Progressive Conservative Party House Leader (July 27, 1968 - September 20, 1973)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
  • Official Opposition House Leader (July 27, 1968 - September 20, 1973)
  • Progressive Conservative Party House Leader (July 27, 1968 - September 20, 1973)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)
  • Official Opposition House Leader (August 14, 1974 - February 24, 1976)
  • Progressive Conservative Party House Leader (August 14, 1974 - February 24, 1976)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Peace River (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 1378)


November 12, 1979

Mr. G. W. Baldwin (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, I thank hon. members on both sides of the House who strove to make my position clear for me on this very important issue. I want to say that my view with regard to the question of breach of law is very simple, that no person be he ever so great shall be above

the law. I am glad that the Solicitor General (Mr. Lawrence) and the Prime Minister (Mr. Clark) seem to agree with that.

I would vigorously oppose any attempt to change that particular rule. It is a position I took some years ago when the then prime minister and members of his cabinet were in breach of the law in that they broke the Temporary Wheat Reserves Act. I took very strong measures to try and have them impeached at that time. Unfortunately I was unsuccessful. That was a previous Speaker. Who knows, Your Honour may have different ideas about impeachment.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
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November 8, 1979

Mr. Baldwin:

Mr. Speaker, before the government House leader breathes a sigh of relief and subsides on this issue, I would like to make a suggestion and also ask him a question. It may be very productive, having in mind the events of the last

day or so, for the government House leader to proceed with all due speed to bring in a motion for Parliament to reform. It might be advantageous for this House and for the people of Canada.

I would like to ask him a question with respect to the motion I brought under Standing Order 43. I know the hon. gentleman is doing his very best to see that engrossed in the form of a motion the House can deal with. However, it would be idle to proceed with the freedom of information legislation until we have some opportunity to discuss that antiquated obscenity which masquerades as the law under the Official Secrets Act. I hope this motion can be brought in at the same time so that the committee will be seized with jurisdiction.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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November 5, 1979

Mr. Baldwin:

That sounds like the NDP caucus.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES
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November 5, 1979

Mr. Baldwin:

The hon. member for Timiskaming (Mr. Peters) brought to my attention the difficulty which ordinary people have in understanding the legislation, and not only understanding it but realizing the extent to which, at the whim of the minister on the advice of his officials, the government may vary, change and alter not only these tariffs but the non-tariff structure, and the people who are involved will not know anything about it until it is over and done with.

I am fortunate to be able to sit on the same committee in this ensuing session, and I hope that the committee will continue to give to the people of Canada, as an arm of this Parliament, an opportunity for them to stand up and complain about the practice of using orders in council and regulations under this act without there being some remedy. One of the things which we have suggested, and I hope this government will bring it into force-and I see my hon. friend, the Minister of National Revenue (Mr. Baker), who is charged with this bill and is a very useful member of that committee, and also the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (Mr. Hnaty-shyn), both of whom, I hope, will see to it-is that in cases of this kind there be pre-publication of rules and of orders in council as well as of regulations so that people who are affected will be advised. This will be done by notice so that those who will be affected, the producers and the consumers, will have an opportunity to make representations directly to the government or to the tribunal which will be making the decision, or to members of Parliament who, in the final analysis, are the ultimate harbingers of destiny, as it should be, of the affairs of the nation.

There is no doubt in my mind that a continuation of this practice is the easy way to do things, to sit cosily up in your office and enact the regulation or order in council. Nine times out of ten the minister does it on the advice of his advisers. I am not saying that in a disparaging sense, because it is utterly impossible in the kind of society we have for ministers to be on top of all the data, all the orders in council, and all propositions which are put before them.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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November 5, 1979

Mr. Baldwin:

It is time the matter received the attention of this House. I am sure that from time to time this committee will be bringing in recommendations when it has come to their attention that there have been abuses of the regulatory process, so that the public of Canada will know that there is a

November 5, 1979

worry about the lack of speed in respect of agricultural matters at this time. These things can and will be done.

Under this new minister most of those things that have to be known to keep the agricultural industry out of trouble are known very quickly. Most of these things are known two or three weeks before the trouble develops. Under the previous administration we had great difficulty in getting things done. 1 should not say that we never got tariffs imposed, because I remember shortly after coming here the hon. member for Essex-Windsor did impose a surcharge on cherries. 1 think he was able to do that because other members of cabinet did not realize or understand what was going on. As soon as they did, that was the end of it, and we did not see another rapid imposition of a surcharge to provide the protection needed.

Under the previous administration we thought we were going to see a formula developed. We had hopes that the former minister would be able to sell that formula to his cabinet colleagues. He was unsuccessful because five years or six years later we still did not have a formula. We have such a formula today, and I am quite proud to note its existence. This is a formula that can and will be workable.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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