Heath Nelson MACQUARRIE

MACQUARRIE, The Hon. Heath Nelson, B.A., M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.A.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
September 18, 1919
Deceased Date
January 2, 2002
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heath_MacQuarrie
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=8874ad6a-cef4-4764-be03-7a8555017c67&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, political scientist, professor, radio-commentator, teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs (August 17, 1962 - February 6, 1963)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 424)


May 3, 1978

1. What members of the press, House of Commons, PMO staff accompanied Prime Minister Trudeau on his recent visit to New York?

2. Who accompanied the Prime Minister to his meeting with the United Nations Secretary General?

3. What members of the Department of External Affairs based in Ottawa, accompanied the Prime Minister on his visit to New York?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Full View Permalink

April 7, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, I love these crowded afternoons! One has the feeling that there is a tremendous audience in the galleries and in the House hanging upon every utterance of hon. members, and that inspires us to do our best. It is regrettable that the fourth estate, which seems to regard this place as nothing more than theatre, abandons always, and almost in total, the Friday matinee. I have often thought in my 21 years here that the greatest problem of the press gallery, and they have many, is that many of its members are brought up from the police beat, and since it is not always so clear to distinguish between the accused and the accuser in this House, they quite often do not really perceive what is going on.

I want to congratulate the hon. member for York-Sunbury (Mr. Howie) for bringing up for consideration this Friday afternoon a topic which is as old as confederation and, indeed, older. Our people in the sea-bound provinces have troubled themselves about this situation. They studied and debated it and brought their great, constructive suggestions and inquiries to the national legislature after the dominion was formed. It is very significant that the hon. gentleman should interlace this particular question of transportation with the concept of regional economic disparity. It pleases me that the very distinguished Canadian, the former premier of Nova Scotia, the Hon. G. I. Smith, was the man who brought to the dominion-provincial constitutional discussions the question of regional economic disparity. It is the kind of question which a federation should, properly be seized with as it studied the problems of the confederation.

It always was, but it is only recently that it has been recognized as, a profound truth that no national economy is strong or vibrant if the regional components thereof are weak or disorganized. I am not nearly as happy with things as the speaker who preceded me. The best remark he made was that even his party now recognizes that the user-pay concept really never was much good and should be decently and hurriedly interred, and for that I congratulate him.

I thought that my colleague from York-Sunbury brought forward some constructive suggestions, and I am appalled that we have allowed the advantages of the Atlantic region to lapse. We were brought in, and, indeed, urged-some would say seduced-into confederation 100 and some years ago because of our location. We were in the corridors of commerce; we had the great ice-free ports. Now all this has been lost. Our wonderful merchant navy has withered away. I have said in the Chamber before that whenever I travel abroad, because

80033-57%

April 7, 1978

Maritime Transport

my father was a sailor and I was born in a seacoast village, I go to the harbours and I look at all the flags; but I never find a Canadian flag no matter how crowded the harbour. Whether it is Havana, Piraeus or anywhere else, you do not see the Canadian flag of commerce, yet less than a generation ago we had the fourth largest merchant navy in the world.

I thought that my colleague's remarks about the railways were profoundly true. There is no inherent opposition among the Canadian people to travelling by rail, but we have passed through a situation where it has become very difficult and inconvenient to use that particular mode. Timetables were inconvenient. The basic structures and infrastructures like the roadbed, coaches and so on became uncomfortable. Then, because people abandoned them for comfort, figures were presented which suggested that people did not care for this mode of travel. I predict that even in my time-and I am not nearly as young as the two other members who spoke, though I am not as old as I look, thank God-the day will come-

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION
Full View Permalink

April 7, 1978

Mr. Macquarrie:

over 12 years for urgent and important improvements to the Magdalen Islands airport, requests made by my predecessor the Hon. Maurice Sauve and myself since 1968, to be precise, without someone feeling guilty down deep, when expenditures of some $5 to $6 million are being put off or turned down for some four to five years to give that insular population a mode of transport which is the only one, I repeat, during the winter season? How can those expenditures be denied or put off when at the same time we hear that our neighbours in Prince Edward Island-and I am not criticizing what the people of that island get-are being given $21 million for improving the airport in Charlottetown, P.E.I. That airport I visit quite frequently on my way to the Magdalen Islands. Its runways are long enough for jet aircraft to use. The people of the Magdalen Islands and myself find it difficult to accept those hesitations in making the improvements needed for so long and which are basic to the economic development of that isolated part of Canada.

In conclusion, I would say that rail transport, the first and for long the only means of transport in Canada, is still for us in Gaspe the only one on which we can rely, so I welcome with joy and great confidence the federal government endeavour with the new VIA Rail company. I had the opportunity to meet the officials who will administer the company, and the dynamism demonstrated by its president and his staff makes me believe that this new trend in rail transportation will be a success, at least I hope so. I have always said that rail transportation is the best, the most reliable, the least energy consuming and the cheapest transportation means, especially if we relate the cost of railway construction to the enormous amounts we must spend every year for road construction.

So, Mr. Speaker, as I wish to leave some time for my colleague and neighbour from the province of New Brunswick, the hon. member for Northumberland-Miramichi (Mr. Dionne), in conclusion I wish to congratulate once again the hon. member for York-Sunbury for this very important motion and I ask the government and the Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (Mr. Lessard), before they consider the economic development aspect, to find a way to attract people and industries in our areas where regional disparities are tremendous so that these industries will be able to sell their products at a competitive price.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION
Full View Permalink

March 20, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, it is now some time since I asked the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Jamieson) why Canada found it necessary to vote with the United States, Israel, El Salvador and no one else against a motion condemning continued Israeli occupation of the territory of other sovereign states. The minister's reply, while lucid, was something less than precise. He referred to the English text as referring to "occupied territory", as distinct, I presume, from "territories". Doubtless he had in mind UN resolution No. 242, so often referred to by Canadian secretaries of state for external affairs as the very cornerstone and inner shrine of Canadian policy. But rarely does this minister, nor did his predecessors, refer to an integral part of resolution 242 which begins by emphasizing "the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war".

It is all very well for the minister to refer to his growing irritation about "rather senseless UN resolutions." I think he must contain his impatience and remember that the UN is a reflection of a vast and variegated world community and that not all members are great powers or western states. Yet the principle of one-state-one-vote must prevail else we are faithless to the great declarations of equality and brotherhood on which the UN charter is based.

What is much more sad than any interpretations of resolution 242 or evaluation of the UN charter is the grave realization that what I discussed so many weeks ago has done such a

major disservice to efforts to bring about peace in the tragically troubled Middle East. The dramatic, genuine and indeed heroic peace mission of President Sadat may have foundered. It did not fail because Mr. Sadat lost heart. It did not collapse because he forgot the most severely harassed victims of the UN creation of Israel, the Palestinians. It failed long before the regrettable, reprehensible, indeed deplorable destruction of the lives of Israeli bus riders by PLO operatives. The grand design for peace conceived and executed by the President of Egypt foundered on Israeli intransigence respecting the withdrawal from settlements in the Sinai and other areas of land which were never turned over to Israeli sovereignty by the United Nations.

In addition, while President Sadat suffered the slings and arrows of some of his Arab brethren, the government of Israel decided and declared that they would establish new settlements, under their control in the Sinai and other areas which were never placed under their jurisdiction.

In the last few days upon the Ossa of sorrow has been placed the Pelion of anguish. The sovereign state of Lebanon has been invaded and hundreds, possibly thousands, of innocent women and children put to the sword or forced to flee in fear and trembling in the face of the mighty Israeli arsenal of naked power.

I hope Canadian peacekeepers will be able to be helpful. I hope that Israel, so often heedless of the resolutions of the UN which created it, will this time listen to the world community. One notes that there is an apparent willingness on the part of the Canadian government to contribute to a peace-keeping force. I fully agree with the concerns expressed by my hon. friend from Victoria (Mr. McKinnon) and re-echoed by the minister this afternoon. But I think it quite unfair and presumptuous to suggest, before the fact, that only those in the north might be non co-operative with the peace force.

There is something familiar in the minister's statement when he says that we have not been asked to make a contribution. In the post-1973 situation it sometimes seemed we were preaching for a call which did not come through all that quickly. Possibly the Arab states question our objectivity on the Middle East situation. On the evidence of our actions and utterances 1 would not be surprised if they made this reading, despite the fact that the Arabs do not always seem too alert in knowing their friends from their enemies.

I close with an appeal for greater objectivity and a deeper commitment to the real victims in the Middle East. I hope Canada will be able to make a tangible contribution to a Middle East peace. I also hope that neither Israel nor the PLO will refuse co-operation with the UN peace force. They will render both themselves and mankind a disservice if they fail to heed the call for compliance.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS-ISRAEL-POSSIBLE CHANGE OF POSITION ON RIGHT TO OCCUPIED TERRITORY
Full View Permalink

March 17, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, I am proud and honoured to follow a fellow Islander, the hon. member who has just spoken, a very distinguished parliamentarian and a one-time opponent of mine in a general election.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS
Subtopic:   HOLIDAYS ACT
Full View Permalink