Heath Nelson MACQUARRIE

MACQUARRIE, The Hon. Heath Nelson, B.A., M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.A.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
September 18, 1919
Deceased Date
January 2, 2002
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heath_MacQuarrie
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=8874ad6a-cef4-4764-be03-7a8555017c67&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, political scientist, professor, radio-commentator, teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs (August 17, 1962 - February 6, 1963)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Hillsborough (Prince Edward Island)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 424)


October 27, 1978

Mr. Macquarrie:

Mr. Speaker, could I say-[DOT]

Old Age Security Act

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   OLD AGE SECURITY ACT
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October 13, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the right hon. Prime Minister. In light of his commendable expression of views on the Camp David meetings, can he now advise us whether President Sadat has accepted an invitation to visit this country; and, if so, for what tentative date?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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June 1, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, on February 22 I asked the minister about the prospects of the establishment of embassies in Amman and Damascus. While congratulating him on his announcement of the opening of a Canadian embassy in Kuwait, I questioned him as to when the Kuwaiti government would be sending an ambassador solely accredited to this country.

As my learned and most respected friend the parliamentary secretary knows, I have urged repeatedly the improvement of contacts between Canada and the peoples of the Arab world. Commercial, social, cultural and diplomatic ties could be strengthened with a group of nations with which there are no reasons for anything but cordial relations with Canada. The economies of many of the countries of the Arab Middle East are developing in such a way as to offer major opportunities for Canadian investment and technical co-operation. It is my experience from frequent visits to these countries that Canada often lags behind other more alert and aggressive trading countries. Considering the slack state of our own economy I think it would be shocking neglect to miss opportunities in the outside world.

While much can be done and must be done by the private sector, the government can assist in strengthening government-to-government contacts, in obtaining information, and by using agencies such as the Canadian Export Development Corporation in reference to those Arab countries not wealthy through an abundance of petro-dollars. Not all Arab countries are facing grave problems of what to do with their money! Some need assistance in infrastructure and especially technical aid.

I fear we have not taken advantage of an opportunity offered by the Kuwaiti fund for development whose director 1 met here in Ottawa a few years ago. It was his suggestion that,

Adjournment Debate

through a marriage of the fund's finances and CIDA's technical know-how, much could be done. I believe it was a most useful suggestion and I would have been happier had the Canadian response been more fulsome and interested.

If I recall aright, when I came to the House of Commons in 1957 we had embassies in the Middle East only in Lebanon, Israel and Egypt. I many times called for exchange of diplomatic missions with other areas of the Arab world, notably Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Emirates. Over the years this has been done and one can see clearly that improved trade and investment contacts have followed. Canadian businessmen are involved in major projects in Saudi Arabia. One of these is the construction of what will be one of the most splendid and costliest universities in the world. I am happy that we have missions in those beautiful Magreb countries, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.

But there are two countries whose importance in the Middle East, and more specifically in Middle East tensions, cannot be overestimated. These are Syria and Jordan. They are confrontation states vitally concerned with the future of the Palestinians whose status, as is now almost universally agreed, is the core of the Middle East problem.

As a founding member of the United Nations which created Israel, as a member of the Security Council and as the provider of peacekeeping forces in the area, Canada must and should be vitally interested in the establishment of a just and durable peace in the area. I do not think we can do our job or play our part without close contact with Jordan and Syria. We need a presence, a listening post, a place for regular dialogue with those pivotal countries. For the immediate and urgent requirement of the current troubles and tension we should be there. Beyond that exist many reasons for strengthening our ties with those two countries who are working out their destiny under different forms of government but to whom peace today and prosperity today and tommorow are vital.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS-APPOINTMENT OF AMBASSADORS TO AND BY FOREIGN COUNTRIES
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May 11, 1978

Mr. Heath Macquarrie (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, if I may make a minor transgression from procedure, I would like to ask the parliamentary secretary to convey to his minister my opinion that she is a lady of great compassion, and I support her in all the endeavours that she has put forward for the deserving people of this country.

Once again I address the House on a problem both important and pressing, the construction of adequate airport facilities for the city of Charlottetown and the province of Prince Edward Island. This is not the first time I have presented my concerns, Mr. Speaker. I brought up the subject most recently on November 7, 1977, and on May 24 and January 31 of the same year. I had hoped that an announcement made by the Minister of Transport (Mr. Lang) on November 8, 1977 concerning funding for the new terminus would have ended my anxiety. However, I fear that my worries are far from alleviated. Delay and uncertainty seem to remain the order of the day.

The problems we are facing become increasingly serious as we approach the summer months. Tourists will soon be heading to our beautiful villages and sunny beaches. Once again the summer visitor arriving by air will be greeted with uncomfortable and inadequate convenience-an unnecessary and unwelcome set of circumstances far from becoming the capital city of the province where confederation began.

9 (2212)

Being a believer in representative democracy, I consider it a grave situation that the worries of the people of the village of East Royalty have not been eased. For months they have had to contend with uncertainty concerning their position in respect to their property. Certainly, land acquisition is a necessary effect of expanding the Charlottetown airport. It has been estimated that approximately 28 property owners will be affected by the project, 28 individuals and families who at the

present time have not been given any reasonable assurance from the federal government as to their circumstances or their future. They had been promised ample opportunity through public meetings to voice their position and to receive information from the responsible officials. The last such public session was held in December of last year, with no indication of another forthcoming. The people of East Royalty are deserving of better treatment and I request of the minister that the village be given immediate recognition and full information so that this problem affecting the airport's expansion be resolved.

Not all Islanders are enthusiastic about the Charlottetown airport plan. On a "hot line" radio program in Charlottetown, some citizens have suggested that $21 million is too much to spend. I know this problem and I am convinced of the importance of new air terminal facilities to the economy of the province and the well-being of its citizens. The sum of $21 million is not too much; in fact, I wonder if it is too little. We of the Island have been too long neglected. I urge the minister not to consider a reduction of this figure. PEI deserves a first class airport and I make no apology for advocating such an installation. Why should we settle for second best? I think we should not.

Four weeks ago we all thought that the days of this parliament were numbered. After today's words from the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) it seems that we are to stay for yet another few months. I urge the minister to devote some of this freshly acquired time to the exigencies of the construction of this much needed facility and to go "full steam ahead" on a sorely needed project, the airport in Prince Edward Island.

I want the parliamentary secretary to assure the minister- who is not the most popular figure in that part of Canada- that he will have my full and sustained support in bringing to Charlottetown a much needed airport with the most modern facilities that our province requires and needs. I will support the minister to the fullest extent of my eloquence and capacity as either a has-been politician or emeritus one, depending upon whether it is friend or enemy who describes me. I should like the parliamentary secretary to know that we appreciate his attention.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   AIRPORTS-CONSTRUCTION OF FACILITIES AT CHARLOTTETOWN-ALLEGED DELAY FOR ECONOMIC REASONS
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May 5, 1978

Mr. Macquarrie:

The "Lady" boats.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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