John Horace DICKEY

DICKEY, John Horace, KSG, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
September 4, 1914
Deceased Date
April 27, 1996
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dickey_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=87d8cf85-54d0-4c2b-9e84-5c3d33a1a514&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, executive, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

July 14, 1947 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
  • Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Defence Production (August 27, 1953 - April 12, 1957)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 280)


March 7, 1957

Mr. Dickey:

You must have changed if you do not want to quibble.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN AFFAIRS AND NATIONAL RESOURCES
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March 7, 1957

Mr. Dickey:

You will have an opportunity to withdraw from parliament very shortly.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN AFFAIRS AND NATIONAL RESOURCES
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March 5, 1957

Mr. J. H. Dickey (Parliamentary Assistant, for the Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I just want to make one or two comments on the debate we have had on second reading. First of all I wish to express great appreciation to the hon. member for Eglinton for his very complimentary reference to the deputy minister of the Department of Trade and Commerce, Mr. Bull. Certainly the hon. member's reference is highly merited. There is no doubt that Mr. Bull has impressed hon. members of this house whenever he has appeared as a witness before one of our committees, and that was certainly the case in connection with the Export and Import Controls Act when it received consideration in committee.

I know the minister would want me to express this word of appreciation to the hon. member for Eglinton, and to say that Mr. Bull's work in the department has been very greatly appreciated. Our regret in seeing him leave the department is relieved only by our great satisfaction at the important new responsibilities he is assuming and the highly merited promotion in the public service he is receiving.

I do not think I should allow the debate to conclude without pointing out to the hon. member for Eglinton that his description of the powers that are vested in the minister under this act was not quite accurate. The powers he referred to with respect to the establishment of control lists on commodities and an area control list-that is, the general

over-all powers contained in the act-are vested in the governor in council, not in the minister. Orders made by the governor in council in pursuance of the powers contained in the act are of course subject to tabling in the House of Commons in accordance with the provision of the Regulations Act. For this reason I think they are more appropriately dealt with than would be the case if they were ministerial powers. The powers of the minister under the act are the more detailed powers of the day to day issuing of permits and certificates, and in this respect are very much more appropriate powers for ministerial action.

The hon. member for Eglinton and other hon. members have spoken of the reasons underlying the existence of this act. The hon. member for Eglinton indicated that previous extensions of this act prior to 1950 or 1951 were for one year's duration. I think I should point out to the house that those extensions were in the period before the Korean emergency, and I believe the Korean emergency changed the whole situation materially with respect to the necessity for controls of this kind and also a number of other matters.

The hon. member also indicated that in 1947 the main basis for having an act of this nature arose out of the scarcity of materials that then existed. In a general sense I think that is probably true, but the fact that in 1954 this was no longer one of the main reasons but had been supplanted by another reason, which was the necessity of maintaining control of exports of arms and other strategic materials to the communist bloc, simply shows how fundamentally and rapidly situations of this kind can change. It indicates, I believe, the basic requirement for an act of this kind which is carefully drawn to keep the necessary authority and power within reasonable limits, but still contains the powers that may require to be exercised, sometimes with very little notice, in the national interest and to ensure national security.

The three hon. members who have spoken said they feel this bill should be considered and studied in the committee on banking and commerce. I cannot agree with that suggestion, Mr. Speaker. As has been pointed out, the bill itself is very brief indeed and consists of only one clause. In the opinion of the government there has not been any fundamental change in the situation which gives rise to any justification for considering basic changes in the act, either in terms of extending its provisions to cover additional matters or in terms of reducing the coverage of its sections.

Export and Import Permits Act

The hon. member for Eglinton suggested there was not as good a case for the retentions of the controls over imports as there was concerning exports.

That is a matter of opinion. When you realize that the control over imports is an absolute and fundamental necessity for the implementation of any price support legislation of the type referred to by the hon. member, you come to the realization that this is a most important power to have in some statute or other for the exercise of support, for agricultural and other commodities. Therefore I submit that second reading should be given to this bill, after which it should be studied in the normal manner in committee of the whole.

Topic:   EXPORT AND IMPORT PERMITS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT EXTENDING OPERATION TO JULY 31,
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March 5, 1957

Mr. Dickey:

With respect to export control, goods are permitted by the United States to move freely into Canada without the imposition of their export controls, so we have to see that our export control provisions are similar in character and in effect to the export controls of the United States in order to ensure that goods of United States origin which come into Canada free of their export control are not then transshipped out of Canada to a destination to which they would not have been eligible to move from the United States itself.

Topic:   EXPORT AND IMPORT PERMITS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT EXTENDING OPERATION TO JULY 31,
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March 5, 1957

Mr. J. H. Dickey (Parliameniary Assistant, for the Minisier of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, the sole purpose of this bill is to extend the Export and Import Permits Act for a further period of three years. By virtue of section 27 of the act it will expire on the 31st day of July, 1957. In this bill no amendment of the act is proposed except the substitution of a new expiry date, namely the 31st of July, 1960.

The necessity for exercising some control over the exportation and importation of goods has existed in varying degrees of intensity for a number of years. It is the opinion of the government that the provisions of the Export and Import Permits Act are adequate to meet current or foreseeable problems in this connection, and that the provisions of the present act should be continued for a further period.

The act provides the authority necessary for control of exports from Canada of arms, ammunition and implements of war, of atomic energy materials and other strategic materials, in order to ensure that these are not shipped to destinations where their use might be detrimental to the security of Canada or her allies. The act also provides authority to control the export of materials which become in short supply, in order to protect the supply position of Canadian industry. The act provides authority for control of all exports to certain countries listed in an area control list, which includes all countries in the Soviet bloc.

The act provides for control of imports only for specified purposes. The most important of these is authority to control imports of any commodity which is under price support in Canada, as butter is at the present time. There is also authority to control imports of any item which is subject to international allocation, as sulphur was during the Korean emergency by the international materials committee. Similarly there is authority to control imports of a commodity by arrangement with the government of the supplying country. This is of

Export and Import Permits Act particular importance to arrangements with the United States government, which does not impose any control on exports to Canada but which may ask Canada to regulate her imports of some scarce commodity from that market in time of emergency.

During the war years and prior to 1947 regulations were issued under the War Measures Act and the national emergency transitional powers act to meet the demands of the situations then existing. The Export and Import Permits Act became part of the statute law of Canada in 1947. The statute was re-enacted with substantial changes and improvements in 1954. The 1954 re-enactment provided for the expiration of the act on the 31st of July, 1957, and parliament is now being asked to continue the act in force for a further period of three years.

I am sure all hon. members look forward to the possibility that future developments in the world situation will be such that this legislation will not always be required. However, under present conditions and having in mind our national security and commitments to our allies, there appears to be no reasonable alternative to the continuation of this act.

I do not believe that any lengthy review of the world situation or the specific provisions of the act is appropriate at this stage of the debate. All of us reach our own conclusions respecting possible developments in the international situation and the prospects of peace or war. However different the bases may be for our views, I doubt that there is a single member of the house who does not agree that if this legislation was required in 1954 it is still necessary today. The experience of the last three years proves conclusively that this act was essential to enable this country to deal effectively with urgent and continuing problems.

The provisions of the act were carefully reviewed by this house during consideration of the bill which was before us in the 1954 session. Since that time its provisions have been found to work satisfactorily for the protection of the security of this country, and have enabled us to comply with any requirements of an international character which have arisen. However, perhaps I should remind the house that the scheme of the act is quite simple. With reference to exports it provides means for the control of the export of certain commodities from Canada to any destination, and the export of any commodity to certain destinations. With respect to imports the act contains power only to control the import into Canada of certain commodities, irrespective of their source. The act also contains the necessary [Mr. Dickey 1

provisions for its administration and enforcement. Continuing efforts have been made to improve the administration of the act, to simplify its application and remove in so far as is practicable inconveniences to Canadian exporters and importers.

Topic:   EXPORT AND IMPORT PERMITS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT EXTENDING OPERATION TO JULY 31,
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