Joseph Léon Vital MALLETTE

MALLETTE, Joseph Léon Vital

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Jacques Cartier (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 16, 1888
Deceased Date
April 17, 1939
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vital_Mallette
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=86a005af-94be-430c-8107-bce88f870a8e&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
miller, secretary-treasurer

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - April 17, 1939
LIB
  Jacques Cartier (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 18)


March 16, 1939

Mr. MALLETTE:

What amount has been expended by the government on cadet services, per province, for the financial years ending March 31, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937 and 1938, respectively?

National Defence

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CADET SERVICES, EXPENDITURES
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February 27, 1939

Mr. MALLETTE:

How many loans, and for what total, have been made so far to the different municipalities on the island of Montreal under: (a) the

Dominion Housing Act; (b) the Home Improvement Act; (c) the National Housing Act?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LOANS UNDER HOUSING AND HOME IMPROVEMENT ACTS-ISLAND OF MONTREAL
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February 23, 1939

Mr. MALLETTE:

Yes. The three members ahead of me should have their names on Hansard, because my request dates back to February 9. They are the hon. member for Pontiac (Mr. McDonald), the hon. member for Lotbiniere (Mr. Francoeur), and the hon. member for Simcoe East (Mr. McLean). I could not get the book to quote from it, but thank the Lord that in the speech of the hon. gentleman on February 17, as reported in Hansard of that date at page 1047, appear a couple of paragraphs which are extremely encouraging to those of us who think we should have closer relations with the United States. I quote from the speech of the hon leader of the opposition:

There are twTo chief reasons why Canada must trade with other countries. In the first place we have a huge area, a small population and rich resources, out of which we produce large quantities of raw materials which must be exported. We do not consume all of them ourselves. That, in the first place, compels us to trade with other countries. Secondly, we are a debtor nation.

And further: [DOT]

In addition to all that, there is a third reason why we must trade. There are certain kinds of products which we cannot produce-tea, coffee, rubber, cotton and even, apparently, wool, though we should, to my mind, be able to produce sufficient wool; I have said that in the house many times. We do not produce oranges-

There are plenty in Ontario:

-and other citrus fruits, and so on. So we are compelled to trade.

1274 COMMONS

Canada-United, States Trade Agreement

So the hon. gentleman advances three good reasons in support of our contention, and I think I am in very good company in quoting him in this instance because I have a high regard for his political sagacity.

We hear so much about our trade with the United States; what is its importance anyway? I have gone to the Canada Year Book, English edition, 1938, and I have extracted a string of figures which I will inflict on the house, if they insist, but I would gladly put

them on Hansard, Mr. Speaker, if I am permitted to do so.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENTS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES'-CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON MOTION FOB APPEOVAU SUBJECT TO REQUIRED LEGISLATION
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February 23, 1939

Mr. MALLETTE:

How many cadets are there in each of the nine provinces of the dominion?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CADETS IN CANADA, BY PROVINCES
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February 23, 1939

Mr. MALLETTE:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, because it would have taken me ten minutes to read them. They are as follows:

Canada's Trade with the United States and Other Foreign Countries

Fiscal year Imports Percentage of total trade Exports (Canadian) Percentage of total trade1886 .. $ 42,818.651 44-6 $ 34.284,490 44-11896 50-8 37.789,481 34-41906 . . 169,256,452 59-6 83.546.306 35-51914 . . 396.302,138 64-0 103.372.825 37-91921 .. 856.176.820 69-0 542,322.967 45-61922 .. 515.958,196 690 292.588.643 39-51926 65-6 480.199,723 36-41929 . . 808.012.229 68-6 504.101.604 36-81930 .. 847,442.037 67-9 515.049.703 40-064-5 349.660.503 43-71932 60-8 257.770.100 42-91933 .. 232.548.055 57-2 107.424.723 37-454-9 220.072 810 33 058-1 304.721.354 40-356-8 300.302.420 42-41937 .. 393.720.662 58-6 435.014.544 410

Aggregate External Merchandise Trade of Canada

Fiscal Aggregate

year external trade

1886

1896

1906

1914

1921

1922

1926

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936 ; "

1937

There is only one more item, another argument in support of our contention which appeared in La Presse of November 19, 1938, two days after November 17, when the treaty was signed. It says:

" We may now expect our small fruits to be exported to the United States." says J. H. Lavoie, director of the provincial service of horticulture in the province of Quebec.

That is very nice coming from the government of Quebec, and there would have been many more in favour of the treaty had the government of that province entertained towards this government a more Christian attitude. But that was the only encouragement we got from that source.

A great deal of fun has been poked at the Prime Minister's use of the word "appeasement" in connection with this trade treaty; but hon. gentlemen who are not too busy might look up the Gazette, published in Montreal. a very good newspaper which has this headline on its front page in this morning's issue, "Chamberlain hopes to weld peace by trade." I admit that the old gentleman with the umbrella, may not always score one hundred per cent, but he makes a terribly good showing. Speaking at Blackburn, England, he is reported to have made this statement, which I will put on Hansard for the benefit of my Tory friends and other unbelievers :

It may well be that this approach by way of trade in which we have a common interest may turn out to be the best and quickest way of bringing about a better understanding between our two countries.

A great many statistics have been put on Hansard in this debate. I have been guilty of putting a few on myself. There is much to be said for statistics, but perhaps I may be permitted to tell a little anecdote which undoubtedly members of the house will appreciate.

A few years ago, in a moment of patriotic fervour, I joined the Montreal Canadian club. I have paid my fee every year since, and I am still a member in good standing.

Canada-United, States Trade Agreement

With me it became almost a part of my religion to attend the Canadian club luncheon at the Windsor hotel, on Peel street, Montreal, nearly every Monday, the day of their weekly luncheon, and 1 remember that on one occasion the guest was Mr. Philip Kerr, who I think now adorns the House of Lords in England as Lord Lothian. At the beginning of his speech-I do not want to shock the ears of any member-he said that in his opinion there were three kinds of lies, and he enumerated them as follows: Lies, damned lies, and statistics. 1 want to say, Mr. Speaker, that those are my views too.

The King government has therefore, in negotiating a broader trade agreement with the United States, once more upheld the true interests of Canada, thereby achieving a diplomatic and commercial success for which the country will be grateful.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENTS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES'-CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON MOTION FOB APPEOVAU SUBJECT TO REQUIRED LEGISLATION
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