Major James William COLDWELL

COLDWELL, The Hon. Major James William, P.C., C.C.

Personal Data

Party
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)
Constituency
Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
December 2, 1888
Deceased Date
August 25, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_James_Coldwell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=85a45525-d20a-41db-8c2a-1b91c360656b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, gentleman, principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 1972)


January 20, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

I have always thought I was in the right party, and as long as I think so I shall remain in what I consider to be the right party.

I join, too, in wishing him health and strength so that he may carry on in the high office to which he has been called by the party; now, of course, occupying as he does -what shall I say-the third highest position in this House of Commons; first the Speaker, then the Prime Minister and then the leader of Her Majesty's loyal opposition. In that capacity we wish him well, and it is a capacity I hope he will fill in this house for at least some time.

I am not going to express a further opinion on this occasion; but, Mr. Speaker, we wish to join the Prime Minister in what he has said regarding the hon. member for Quebec East and the hon. member for Algoma East. We hope both will find happiness in the days to come.

Topic:   LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
Subtopic:   TRIBUTE TO OLD, WELCOME TO NEW
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January 20, 1958

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, the house has listened to some long speeches today, in fact two of them, and I do not propose to speak at any great length tonight and to take up the various points made either by the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker) or by the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Pearson). But I am going to say to the Prime Minister that I want to congratulate him first of all on his restoration to health, which I forgot to do this afternoon, and second, on the good guess he made. Of course, it was so obvious that no one could really miss it.

I must say that I was surprised at the Leader of the Opposition moving an amendment of this description containing the words which the Prime Minister pointed out a few minutes ago. I wonder whether the Leader of the Opposition and the Liberal party have forgotten last June.

Topic:   AMENDMENT CALLING FOR RESIGNATION OF GOVERNMENT
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January 20, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

I did not say that, because I do not know. My hon. friend does.

Topic:   AMENDMENT CALLING FOR RESIGNATION OF GOVERNMENT
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January 20, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

As my hon. friend interjects, the figures are still rising according to the more recent figures that have been given to us. I therefore say that we have the right to say to this government, "What are you doing about the situation, and what did you do about it in the autumn of last year?"

Topic:   AMENDMENT CALLING FOR RESIGNATION OF GOVERNMENT
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January 20, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

Oh yes. I think that might to some extent be regarded as a compliment although, of course, it was done in a very critical manner. I might find some data in that which might come in handy to me on some future occasion.

I do not propose to speak any longer. We have had a long day. I have moved an amendment. The amendment wipes out a part which I think should never have been included in the motion. I am quite sure the Leader of the Opposition and those with whom he conferred must have had their tongues in their cheeks, because they knew perfectly well that we could not support an amendment of that sort calling for the restoration of a Liberal government in the circumstances under which they resigned last June and the situation which resulted in a general election.

I want to say this to my friends opposite: do not imagine for one moment that I am expressing any confidence in the Conservative party. I am going to say this very seriously: never in my experience have I seen a group of men assume office with a very clear promise and responsibility in at least one important particular and then go back so completely on that promise. I refer to the trans-Canada pipe line debate.

They were going to get rid of these buccaneers; they were going to end this nefarious deal. The Prime Minister went round the country talking about black Friday. Some of us who participated in that scene will never forget it. But they seem to have forgotten about it, and tried to shelve the whole thing by referring it to a royal commission. I am not going to talk about the personnel of that royal commission. I have never tried to attack the personal character of any man on that commission, and I would not do so because I think they are all estimable citizens, but I cannot yet see how a gentleman who controls and operates one of the greatest privately owned public utilities in the world can give an entirely unbiased view on whether or not the trans-Canada pipe line should be publicly or privately owned. Nor can I see how a gentleman with great private interests in a foreign country-foreign-con-trolled organizations in that country-can give an unqualified verdict in support of the elimination of foreign control over some utilities in our country. As I said over the radio, and I say it again in this house, I regard this as a betrayal of trust.

Topic:   AMENDMENT CALLING FOR RESIGNATION OF GOVERNMENT
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