Major James William COLDWELL

COLDWELL, The Hon. Major James William, P.C., C.C.

Personal Data

Party
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)
Constituency
Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
December 2, 1888
Deceased Date
August 25, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_James_Coldwell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=85a45525-d20a-41db-8c2a-1b91c360656b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, gentleman, principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
CCF
  Rosetown--Biggar (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1972)


May 29, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

That is the whole point.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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January 31, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

I am sure there is.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF INQUIRY INTO ALLOCATION OF BOX CARS
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January 31, 1958

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Is

it not usual when an appointment of this description is made by order in council to have the terms of reference tabled and given to parliament? Is this not a most unusual

procedure, showing entire disregard for the regular parliamentary procedure?

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF INQUIRY INTO ALLOCATION OF BOX CARS
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January 20, 1958

Mr. Coldwell:

As a matter of fact, on the night of June 10 the Liberal party was utterly defeated. It was obvious to me at the time, and I said so, that there was only one honourable way for the leader of that party, the then prime minister, to act, and that was to submit his resignation to the governor general and call upon the leader of the opposition, not because I had confidence in a Conservative administration but because that was the proper constitutional thing to do. .

May I say that since they surrendered the reins of office in June and told His Excellency that the Liberal government could not carry on, no party in this house could support an amendment of this description calling for the resignation of the government in order to put back in power a party which said it could not carry on. May I add that there has been a little change in the membership of the house since then because there are two more members in the government side today than there were on the night of June 10. Therefore I want to dispose of that immediately. We could no more vote for this amendment as it stands with this proposal in it than we could do anything else that appeared as unintelligent as that would be.

Having disposed of that, let me say that throughout this parliament we have tried to place our views before the house at every opportunity. We have done that by way of various amendments which under our parliamentary rules, of course, are regarded, I think sometimes unfortunately, as want of confidence motions. I know that we have been twitted and told that we knew that

3540 HOUSE OF

Suggested Resignation of Government our Liberal friends would not support us, and that therefore we were quite safe in moving these various amendments.

May I say to you, Mr. Speaker, and to the house that we did not know what the attitude of the Liberal party would be shortly after it resigned last June, when our members met in the city of Winnipeg and decided upon the course that we have followed consistently ever since. We have no apologies to offer. We have functioned as we think an opposition party should function. We have, as we said we would, supported legislation that we thought would be in the interests of the people of Canada. We have done that consistently. When we thought that legislation should be amended to make it better, we have moved amendments. When the government has failed to bring down legislation which we thought should be brought down in view of the statements made by the Prime Minister and others during the election campaign we have moved amendments along the lines of those promises that were made in April, May and June of last year. That has been our consistent policy; and come what may, we shall have no apologies to make either to this house or to the people of Canada when an election comes around as to what our role has been.

Topic:   AMENDMENT CALLING FOR RESIGNATION OF GOVERNMENT
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January 20, 1958

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, may I too rise for the twofold purpose the Prime Minister had in mind when he rose to speak a few moments ago: first, to pay tribute to the right hon. gentleman who led the government for so long and the opposition until today. I hope he will have health and strength to remain with us and to give the parliament of Canada the advice he can give for a good many years yet.

The right hon. gentleman came here, I remember, in 1942 at a time of very great difficulty during the war, and gave freely of himself, having relinquished the practice of a profession in which he not only shone but, indeed, gloried. That was a great sacrifice on his part, and I think the country appreciated it, just as the country appreciates the services he has rendered to this nation as minister of justice, as minister of external affairs and as prime minister. And I am quite sure the right hon. gentleman knows that, whatever the fortunes of his party on June 10 of last year, that was no reflection upon the former prime minister himself.

We join the Prime Minister in expressing our regret that he has felt it necessary to lay down the reins of the leadership in which he was so distinguished and in wishing him well in the future.

I want to join the Prime Minister, too, in congratulating the hon. member for Algoma East (Mr. Pearson). I have known him now for a number of years and have been closely associated with him from time to time at international conferences. I have the highest regard and the greatest respect for him, and his only misfortune is that he is associated with the Liberal party. I could wish otherwise, because I have sometimes found my own mind running along the same channels as the hon. gentleman's mind in international affairs at least.

Topic:   LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
Subtopic:   TRIBUTE TO OLD, WELCOME TO NEW
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