Susan (Sue) BARNES

BARNES, The Hon. Susan (Sue), P.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
London West (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 8, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sue_Barnes
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=84abb4e5-fc2d-4ed5-8adb-c1bd7893e779&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 129 of 130)


March 8, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Madam Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health.

During the fall election campaign many members of the Liberal Party campaigned on the creation of a network of centres of excellence on women's health. We need to develop a women's health curriculum, promote and conduct research on women's health issues, develop health policies and recommend health programs.

On behalf of the men and women of Canada I would like to ask the Minister of Health what steps has she taken to date to implement this very important agenda.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Centres Of Excellence
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March 7, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, in this International Women's Week I would like to highlight the contributions of women entrepreneurs in Canadian society.

An important priority of this government is the implementation of measures to stimulate small and medium sized businesses which we know have accounted for 85 per cent of new job creation since 1979.

Between 1973 and 1993 the number of self-employed women skyrocketed from 89,000 to 323,000. In 1991 over 30 per cent of the self-employed workforce was made up of women. The success rate of women entrepreneurs is twice that of men.

We have every reason to applaud the women in this land who have taken the plunge into self-employment, thereby providing themselves employment and employment for others. Despite obstacles, many more will join their ranks.

It is important that we have identified the issues and that this government support where it can self-employment for those in Canadian society who take on this challenge and opportunity.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Women Entrepreneurs
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February 25, 1994

Mrs. Barnes

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for her questions.

I think it is very important to realize that this government is working toward breaking down interprovincial barriers because it is very important that we trade with each other as well as with the rest of the world. In my riding I am most concerned that the small businesses that have the expertise and the talent access these new markets, not only outside of our country but across our country. We are working toward that very rapidly. I hope these barriers come down so we can have better employment and better mobility for jobs across this land.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Borrowing Authority Act, 1994-95
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February 25, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time. I consider myself privileged. I am deeply grateful to those in the urban riding of London West who put their trust in me. I pledge to do my utmost to justify this trust.

I wish to acknowledge and thank warmly my family and all those colleagues and friends who support me in these exciting days. As the mother of three young children it would be impossible to carry out my responsibilities without their encouragement and assistance.

In this Chamber I feel the privilege of serving Canada and my constituents, and to serve truly I pray for humility and decry arrogance, for humility leads to wisdom, the wisdom to listen and appreciate, to try and understand as well as to be understood.

This is the start of my journey, a journey that may not be easy. It will certainly be bewildering and sometimes treacherous. I will strive for the courage, faith and courtesy to face squarely these unusual times of changing conditions and share a vision of a strong Canada with Canadians across our country.

Let there be no doubt that together with all members of the House I will not shrink from responsibility so that one day I can look back and take pride in my modest contribution to this chosen homeland of mine.

I came to this country at the age of 5, having been born on the beautiful Mediterranean island of Malta. I am the first Maltese born Canadian to sit as a member in the House. I am very proud and thankful to be a Canadian.

At the commencement of the 35th Parliament each of us brings along an agenda that embodies a vision of Canada. Mine is a vision of freedom and opportunity based on tolerance and equality, a vision that rejects discrimination and extremism and every shade of injustice, a vision that gives us the assurance of a glorious Canada with all its democratic institutions at our disposal. We are fortunate in this land to have progressed well in many of these goals but our work is yet unfinished.

The primary concern of my constituents is the rebuilding of our Canadian economy and jobs for the present and jobs for the future. I am heartened that the government, true to its commitments, has already taken the initiative to translate our promises into action and charted its direction for choices in co-operation with the provincial governments. I hope the entire range of economic institutions and groups will co-operate in this great venture for the realization of our pressing objectives of deficit reduction and growth.

What we need for our deficit reduction and for facing the economic challenges of the nineties is a simultaneous commitment to increase economic growth and to regain control of our finances. Our budget addresses squarely these requirements.

In tackling the issue of growth one of our main thrusts will be where the backbone of job creation is: the area of small business. Small and medium sized businesses have accounted for 85 per cent of all new jobs created in Canada since 1979. In my riding of London West there are over 1,000 small businesses and many are struggling.

The government through the Minister of Finance introduced a plan for growing small businesses. It is evident the government will take the necessary measures to address the basic problems facing the small business industry.

The Minister of Finance has announced the establishment of a Canada investment fund to provide venture capital for innovative companies. There will be a Canadian technology network to help small businesses gain access to new technologies. A task force will be established to work with banks to develop a code of conduct for small business lending.

Another booster for small business will be the replacement of the GST, a program that in addition to dampening growth by fuelling the underground economy has been an expensive administrative nightmare. I also believe it is time to harmonize our provincial and federal taxation.

The industrial competitiveness of the nation today more than ever before is influenced by its capabilities in science and technology and by its research and development efforts.

OECD comparisons of science and technology expenditures as a percentage of GDP find that countries with a positive balance of trade in high growth industries are those that make substantial investments in research and development.

The budget has now strengthened R and D in Canada. We must encourage technology partnerships among Canadian universities, research institutions and the private sector which emphasize the commercial application of research and development.

The Drake-Siebens Research Institute, the John P. Robarts Research Institute, the University of Western Ontario, University Hospital and an industrial research park in my riding all are eager to share in the value added jobs that can result from these linkages.

It is especially important to tap the talent and energy of the young minds of a generation that is now facing over 17 per cent unemployment. We must ensure that there is a relevant transition of these young minds from their schooling to their workplace. New youth internship and apprenticeship programs are being launched under the budget.

Our world has undergone tremendous changes and the time has now come for a re-examination of a whole basis of social and economic policy. The world has become highly unpredictable both politically and economically. Nevertheless there is one common feature, a growing interdependence between countries, an interdependence that is unavoidable and is strengthened by a process of world economic globalization.

The conclusion of the Uruguay round of the GATT further reduced tariff barriers. The political obstacles formerly imposed by the cold war are no more. Market based economies unconstrained by ideological divisions between east and west are gaining wide acceptance, all of which reinforce the globalization process and present us with a tremendous potential for new markets and ventures with east European countries, the new republics of the former Soviet Union, China and the Pacific Rim.

Our jobs and future prosperity will depend upon our ability to get access to these new markets and to sell our products and services abroad. Let us start establishing the links to the future. It is important to remember that one in five jobs comes from trade.

As a developed society we have to realize that in shaping our domestic economic policies we must consider the inevitable changing international economic order fuelled by the process of globalization. We must focus on the agents of this globalization process and deepen our understanding of the implications on domestic economic policies in general and trade policies in particular.

At the same time we must ensure that Canadians affected by these changes are supported by the government in coping with a different economic order. Let there be no doubt that for Canadians this will be a challenge but should not be seen as an obstacle to our economic evolution.

I would not be true to myself if I end my maiden speech without touching the subject which has been lingering in the minds and hearts of many Canadians. Much has been said and written about unity.

In 1867, the English and the French communities decided to join together to form a confederation whose existence is now firmly established and which must be perpetuated. The other communities also contributed in an essential way to the development of our country and allowed Canada to become what it is now: a country admired by the entire world. For the nations that it welcomes, cultural diversity is a source of wealth and renewal.

Canadian unity is an established fact and must not be questioned.

It is our strength, our pride and a guarantee of stability and better future for all Canadians.

Preserving that unity is absolutely crucial to all Canadians being able to meet together the challenges of the next century.

As the member from a progressive English speaking riding in the heart of southwest Ontario, I want to say that my Canada includes Quebec.

Quebec is a part of Canada.

I know in my heart that we are one. I know in my mind that we should stay one. Let there be no doubt that whatever tomorrow brings I will stand for a strong and united Canada.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Borrowing Authority Act, 1994-95
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February 25, 1994

Mrs. Barnes

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his comments. I would always support the hon. member's right to be an elected member of this House and to give his viewpoint.

I am speaking from my riding and as one who did vote in favour of the Charlottetown accord and also from my heart when I say that I believe Canada is a nation that is for all of us.

I was very fortunate as a young girl to have lived in the province of Quebec for a short time. I regard Quebec as part of my country. I want the silent majority across this land to know that we are inclusive. We are not two solitudes. It is my wish that we are one. I think it is very important economically that we grow more together, help each other and provide the necessary cohesiveness across this land so that we can go beyond.

This is a country that has told us clearly that it does not want to involve itself in constitutional debate. They need this country to get back to work. That is why I am here. I do have a very heartfelt wish for unity in this country and I will express it but I will also respect other members to deliver their messages.

I am hopeful, though, that my message as an English speaking Canadian will go out to members who represent constituents in Quebec and that they hear my message as an anglophone in Ontario. I am studying French and these were very difficult words for me to say in French. I do not understand everything but I want members to know that I am trying.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Borrowing Authority Act, 1994-95
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