Susan (Sue) BARNES

BARNES, The Hon. Susan (Sue), P.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
London West (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 8, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sue_Barnes
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=84abb4e5-fc2d-4ed5-8adb-c1bd7893e779&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 128 of 130)


April 21, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, in this National Volunteer Week I applaud the vital contribution of volunteers in our communities.

Volunteering benefits both parties. It provides self-fulfilment for the volunteer. The volunteer performs numerous tasks that otherwise could not be done. Participation by volunteers in our society strengthens the interrelated fabric of our communities.

Over 13 million Canadians are involved in volunteer work either on their own or through an organization. Canadians contribute over one billion hours in time to voluntary organizations, the equivalent of 617,000 full time positions. Translated into a 1990 dollar equivalent, the collective value of this volunteer time is $13.2 billion annually.

It is important to thank these selfless people who enrich and serve our country through their generous sharing of time and talents.

Bravo, fellow Canadians.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   National Volunteer Week
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April 20, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-239, an act respecting the decade of the brain.

Mr. Speaker, I wish to introduce a bill to declare the 1990s the decade of the brain following an original initiative of the World Health Organization in the late 1980s.

It is the human brain which makes us unique among living creatures. Ailments of the brain carry with them heart rending disabilities that can rob us of the very essence of personhood. The real tragedy is not only the disease that may cause death but the disintegration of the mind, with devastating impact on family and on society.

A great threat to the independence of the elderly are diseases of the brain, some treatable, most preventable. A healthy mind is the greatest guarantee for continued independence.

A cognitive mental stability enhances the ability to heal and recuperate, to cope and overcome physical ailments. It is also important to note that diseases of the brain are among the costliest, both directly and indirectly.

It is my fond hope that the bill will raise the awareness of Canadians and will encourage further research and support to those in our communities who are forging advances of knowledge that will ultimately improve the lives of all of us.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Decade Of The Brain Act
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April 14, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, with national Citizenship Week starting on April 17, I would like to highlight the important contribution of immigrants to Canadian society.

Canada is a nation of immigrants. The country as we know it would not exist without the struggle and determination of millions of people of diverse origin and background who have landed on Canadian shores in search of a better life.

The bilingual and multicultural character of Canadian society is a source of wealth. Immigrants also contribute to the Canadian economy through the actual inflow of capital investment, the setting up of self-employed businesses and the importation of required skills.

In time many immigrants become Canadian citizens and share willingly the privileges and responsibilities that citizenship bestows. As one immigrant Canadian I am both proud and thankful and I look forward to next week's celebration of Canadian citizenship.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Citizenship Week
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March 21, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

In 1966 the United Nations declared March 21 the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in commemoration of the 1960 Sharpeville massacre in South Africa.

Since 1989 the Government of Canada has sponsored a national anti-racism public education program. This campaign works with key institutions and organizations to raise awareness of the existence of racial discrimination and to promote effective means to combat racism.

There is no justification for racial discrimination. Any doctrine of racial differentiation is scientifically false, morally reprehensible and socially unjust. We should recognize that prejudice and discrimination are problems that must be acknowledged and addressed.

As individuals in one of the great democracies of the world we must all bear a personal responsibility in the elimination of racism and racial discrimination. Only then will Canadians be able to participate fully and equally in our society.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Racial Discrimination
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March 15, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to applaud the establishment of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame was announced in November 1993 in London, Ontario and the induction of the first laureates will take place May 27, 1994 in London.

Housed in London's new convention centre and sponsored by the Medical Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame will provide an enduring tribute that will publicize the accomplishments of Canadian men and women who have made important contributions to the understanding of disease and the advancement of health everywhere.

Laureates inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame will be selected annually in the categories of clinical medicine, basic medical research and applied medical research.

Canadians should be proud of the establishment of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame, an important national initiative celebrating discovery and innovation in medical science.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Canadian Medical Hall Of Fame
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