Susan (Sue) BARNES

BARNES, The Hon. Susan (Sue), P.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
London West (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 8, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sue_Barnes
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=84abb4e5-fc2d-4ed5-8adb-c1bd7893e779&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue (February 23, 1996 - July 15, 1998)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada with special emphasis on Judicial Transparency and Aboriginal Justice (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  London West (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 127 of 130)


May 12, 1994

Mrs. Barnes

In answer to that question, Madam Speaker, I am going to guarantee that the Young Offenders Act will look at the rehabilitation of children. When they come out at the end of the process they are going to be better citizens than when they went in. That is not just by punishment; it is by changing behaviour and behaviour modification. If we target our resources smartly we can achieve that and not just hold people in a pattern.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Supply
Full View Permalink

May 12, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Madam Speaker, the hon. member talked about having her house broken into, probably by youths.

I have had my house broken into and the person was not brought to court. I do not know who did it. It is very important when we have these discussions that we not generalize, passing the blame on to youth. It could very easily have been an adult. I know the member qualified her remarks by saying that it was the police but it is important that we these generalizations.

We can deal in fact in this instance. We do not know who broke into my house, we do not know who broke into the member's house. I would like the member to have an opportunity to say that, talking about reality and perception.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Supply
Full View Permalink

May 12, 1994

Mrs. Barnes

Madam Speaker, I am very happy to respond to the question of the hon. member opposite. The multi-disciplinary approach is the integration of all departments of the government and all levels of government. An interdisciplinary approach could be health.

When I was visiting Vancouver recently I made a trip to a core city public school. That school not only served breakfast; it also served lunch. I venture to say that was most of the nutritional value those children received. It was a very difficult teaching environment. It brought home to me the multi-disciplinary approaches that were required in the classroom, literacy training being one. I saw a divergence of cultural backgrounds. That school was very different from many schools in my riding.

We must not manage all our problems with individual lines where departments do not talk to each other. Health must talk to education and education must talk to employment. We have to understand that poverty is the link to a lot of crime. Violence begets violence. With family destruction and its changing nature it is impossible to have the same family picture as a "Leave it to Beaver" commercial for a TV program when I grew up. It does not exist.

There are many poor families in the country in which children are not properly cared for and are left unattended. There are many single parent families where the wife leaves an abusive situation and takes her family with her into a poverty situation. That is what is happening.

It does not matter whether we are talking about guns because there are multi-disciplinary aspects to justice. Maybe it is time to re-evaluate gun control legislation so that they are not around to create devastation for families and victims.

I must say no one party in the House has ownership of concern. We are all concerned as parliamentarians about the victims in society. They are regarded with respect by this side of the House.

It is important to remember we must deal with all the facets of this problem, and there are many. We will have time to deal with that in this Parliament. I certainly will be making it one of my aims to work very actively in this area.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Supply
Full View Permalink

May 10, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, today there is widespread concern that our communities are being threatened by youth crime. We should however, divorce perception from reality.

First, we must remember that most youths are law abiding, hard working young people. It is important to recognize that 60 per cent of crimes committed by young people are property crimes. Also, of all violent crimes reported in Canada 86 per cent are committed by adults, not youths.

The Minister of Justice will shortly introduce legislation that will propose specific changes to the Young Offenders Act. Canadians will also be heard by a committee when the legislation undergoes a thorough 10-year review.

The protection of society cannot be achieved solely by amending legislation. It is crucial that we adopt a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the underlying causes of youth crime.

Crime prevention is an important area where our communities can share this responsibility. We must not forget that the home is where most attitudes are first developed.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Crime Prevention
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1994

Mrs. Sue Barnes (London West)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to express my concern and that of my constituents about the importation of serial killer cards and serial board games into Canada.

We do not need products that exploit violence and cruelty. It is appalling that in the midst of the recent senseless shootings and the flare-up of violent crime some would go to any length to promote and commercialize serial killer cards and serial board games.

I am heartened that the Minister of Justice tabled in this House on April 20 draft amendments to the Criminal Code and the custom tariff. These draft amendments would prohibit the sale or distribution of offensive material such as serial killer cards and serial board games to children under the age of 18.

Let there be no doubt that I along with my colleagues in this House will do my utmost to effectively deal with the commercialization of crime and still work within the Charter of Rights and Freedoms of our country.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Killer Cards
Full View Permalink