William WRIGHT

WRIGHT, William

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Muskoka (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 29, 1853
Deceased Date
January 4, 1926
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wright_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=82d7e9e4-2cdc-418e-94b5-1b115c88ac94&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
blacksmith, merchant

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 91)


August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

No. It is said by the hon. member for Edmonton that the farmers only got $2.40 a bushel for their wheat when they expected to get $3. My answer to that is that the Government acted in the interest of the consuming public and that the people were saved probably millions of dollars through this action. Yet the hon. member for Edmonton would condemn that action and he points out that, because of it, wheat was dearer, in Minneapolis than it was in Winnipeg. The Minneapolis buyers were depending on getting their little surplus of No. 1 hard wheat at a particular time in the season and they expected that they would get what they needed from the Northwest. That supply was suddenly cut off. We know that there are certain times in the year when grain dealers themselves are needing grain, when some are on the short side of the market, when they have to get a little more to fill an order, and we also know that everybody is buying very close when it comes down to the end of the season. It will all depend on whether wheat is scarce or not whether it does or does not go up abnormally. The man who is in the business has to take his chance and the price may go up or down. Under ordinary conditions nobody can tell what, at a particular time in the future, is going to happen with regard to the price of wheat. But we

know that the conditions are not ordinary and the probability as to what will be required is a matter of j udgment on the part of the buyer. Those who had the necessary money and credit bought ahead. No" doubt those who bought wheat made some money, but that fact is not a ground for objection to the price. We must take the price as we find it, offset it by the charges and arrive at a decision as to what would be a proper profit to take on a barrel of flour or any other commodity. I submit that that is the proper way of going about it. When the statement is sent broadcast that because a man bought something a year ago and it happened to go up abnormally, he is to be condemned for his acumen in looking to the future and judging how things would be. I say that such a statement has no basis in reason. He had to take his chance of the price going down as well as of its going up. It is only an ordinary principle of business that the man who uses his best judgment in regard to these things is going to get a little extra profit; but if he makes a loss he bears it as well as he may. It is an unreasonable thing to take the price of flour now and the price of wheat' a year ago and put one against the other. The thing is so utterly absurd and unfair that I wonder at anybodj taking that ground in this House.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

The statement has been spread broadcast throughout this Dominion by a man engaged in the grain business around Port Arthur-and it is largely quoted in the press of this country and by hon. members in this House-that the millers of this country are making very large profits and that the public are being bled accordingly. I have made just a small tabulation with regard to this matter. Those who are acquainted with the milling business know that in the eastern provinces it takes about five bushels of wheat to make a barrel of flour.

You might sometimes make a barrel of flour out of four and a half bushels of the very finest grade of wheat grown in the Northwest, but as a rule four and three-quarter bushels of wheat are required to make a barrel of flour. Figuring that out at $2.40 a bushel, which is the price that has prevailed in Winnipeg for a very considerable time, we get $11.40. Out of the four and three-quarters bushels of wheat, the miller would probably get $1.50 worth of bran and middlings; that is figuring bran and shorts at 2 cents per pound almost, and it would not average that to-day. But we will suppose that the bran and middlings are worth $1.50; that leaves $9.90 as the net cost of a barrel of flour at Winnipeg. To that must be added the price for milling the wheat, the freight from Winnipeg, or Port Arthur, to ithe various centres from which the flour

is distributed, the wholesaler s price the wholesaler generally buys by the carload- the retailer's price, the bags for the flour, the cartage charges from the retailer to his customers and from the station to the retailers. AH these things add to the price, and when a man makes the statement that millers in this country are making $5 a barrel out of the flour they make, he is making an absolutely ridiculous statement, which ought not to carry any weight, and which certainly does not carry any weight, with those who have the slightest knowledge of this business. A man who makes a statement of that kind either does not know what he is talking about, or he makes the statement for the deliberate purpose o misleading the consumers of this countrj. I have no objection to a man spreading his opinions on the pages of Hansard and publishing them broadcast throughout the press of this country so long as he gives the actual facts and knows what he is talking about. If the millers are getting too much the people of the country should he told,

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

Does my hon. friend think that the millers, taken as a whole, could buy enough wheat last September to last them for a whole year, and would take the chances of the price of wheat going down as well as up? Any man engaged in ordinary business figures out his profit on the basis of cost at the time he buys the article. Supposing wheat goes down 75 cents a bushel, where will this miller be? He will be out that much.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

I was dealing with the question of wheat and I am quite prepared to go into the other question at any time the hon. gentleman suggests. But, I want to deah with one thing at a time.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

His question would be

more intelligible if he would indicate the grade of flour.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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