William WRIGHT

WRIGHT, William

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Muskoka (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 29, 1853
Deceased Date
January 4, 1926
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wright_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=82d7e9e4-2cdc-418e-94b5-1b115c88ac94&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
blacksmith, merchant

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Muskoka (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 91)


August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

The only reasonable way to figure this is to figure the cost of wheat and the cost of the flour after the wheat is ground. As to the price of bran, I admit that I possibly overstated it. I figured it at $40 a ton. It is not worth that, even including the freight.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

The statement has been spread broadcast throughout this Dominion by a man engaged in the grain business around Port Arthur-and it is largely quoted in the press of this country and by hon. members in this House-that the millers of this country are making very large profits and that the public are being bled accordingly. I have made just a small tabulation with regard to this matter. Those who are acquainted with the milling business know that in the eastern provinces it takes about five bushels of wheat to make a barrel of flour.

You might sometimes make a barrel of flour out of four and a half bushels of the very finest grade of wheat grown in the Northwest, but as a rule four and three-quarter bushels of wheat are required to make a barrel of flour. Figuring that out at $2.40 a bushel, which is the price that has prevailed in Winnipeg for a very considerable time, we get $11.40. Out of the four and three-quarters bushels of wheat, the miller would probably get $1.50 worth of bran and middlings; that is figuring bran and shorts at 2 cents per pound almost, and it would not average that to-day. But we will suppose that the bran and middlings are worth $1.50; that leaves $9.90 as the net cost of a barrel of flour at Winnipeg. To that must be added the price for milling the wheat, the freight from Winnipeg, or Port Arthur, to ithe various centres from which the flour

is distributed, the wholesaler s price the wholesaler generally buys by the carload- the retailer's price, the bags for the flour, the cartage charges from the retailer to his customers and from the station to the retailers. AH these things add to the price, and when a man makes the statement that millers in this country are making $5 a barrel out of the flour they make, he is making an absolutely ridiculous statement, which ought not to carry any weight, and which certainly does not carry any weight, with those who have the slightest knowledge of this business. A man who makes a statement of that kind either does not know what he is talking about, or he makes the statement for the deliberate purpose o misleading the consumers of this countrj. I have no objection to a man spreading his opinions on the pages of Hansard and publishing them broadcast throughout the press of this country so long as he gives the actual facts and knows what he is talking about. If the millers are getting too much the people of the country should he told,

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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

My hon. friend denied me the courtesy of asking a question a few days ago, but I will he more courteous to him than he was to me.

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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

My hon. friend (Mr. Oliver), not very long ago, was urging this Government to do something to cheapen flour.. He asked: Why do you not commandeer wheat as you did last year?

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August 31, 1917

Mr. WRIGHT:

Does my hon. friend think that the millers, taken as a whole, could buy enough wheat last September to last them for a whole year, and would take the chances of the price of wheat going down as well as up? Any man engaged in ordinary business figures out his profit on the basis of cost at the time he buys the article. Supposing wheat goes down 75 cents a bushel, where will this miller be? He will be out that much.

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