Francis N. MCCREA

MCCREA, Francis N.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Sherbrooke (Town of) (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 14, 1852
Deceased Date
October 30, 1926
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_McCrea
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=8266761d-df92-481b-a611-14cdb3e925bd&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Town of) (Quebec)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Sherbrooke (Town of) (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Town of) (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 64)


June 16, 1925

Mr. McCREA:

I cannot hear the hon.

member. I am not disposed to be sarcastic or unreasonable, but my contention is that this country can be prosperous only when the people of the different parts of it make up their minds that they are willing to bear their full share of the responsibilities and the taxation of the Dominion and willing and ready to give the other parts fair play and justice. When we were offered by Mr. Beatty twenty per cent of a general reduction on all

basic commodities, and when that committee, which was hearing the evidence and which spent practically the whole session in gathering information, finally passed, by a small majority if you will, a motion that Mr. Beatty's proposition should be accepted, our friends from the west put up such a rebellion, threatening the government-and unfortunately they frightened them-that the outcome was that they got practically a thirty-five per cent reduction on grain and we who bear the great burden of the taxes got a reduction of six per cent. The west is entitled to all sympathy and justice, and for my part and, speaking so far as I know, for my province, we are inclined and disposed to be just, fair and reasonable, but the time has come when we shall have to have a, little more justice than the west is disposed to give us on freight rates.

In the particular case before the committee now, there is no reason why this whole matter of fixing freight rates should not be placed in the hands of competent men, selected by the government of this country to deal with railway questions and to fix just and fair rates for all parties. Until we get that, this granting a reduction of thirty-five per cent in one section of the country and a reduction of six per cent in our section when we are paying practically eighty per cent of the taxes, is unjust and unfair, and I trust the government will see to it that this injustice is remedied so that all parties will bear their fair share of the responsibilities and taxes. Let us have our share of both the good and the bad. This country of ours, properly governed, properly managed, is the garden of the earth in my judgment. But it will not do for any one element of this Dominion to think they are the chosen people and that they must have all the plums and the other people all the bills.

Topic:   RAILWAY FREIGHT RATES
Subtopic:   BILL TO AMEND THE RAILWAY ACT, '1919
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June 16, 1925

Mr. McCREA:

Mr. Chairman, the question of freight rates is one of the most important before this House and the country, especially in view of the fact that the government owns the greater part of the railway mileage of the country, and when the Canadian National Railway system does not earn sufficient to pay its bills the people are called upon to meet the deficit. I think it is well that we should know what part of the country's business is paying its way, whether that in the east, the west or the centre; and, furthermore, what part of the country is paying the greater proportion of the taxes. Consequently I shall take up some little time to explain my views.

The Crowsnest pass agreement, which we have heard so much about, was entered into in 1897 between the Canadian Pacific Railway Company on the one side and the government of Canada representing the people on the other side. Under that agreement it was provided that the rates-now known as the Crowsnest pass rates-should not exceed certain maxima. I presume it never entered into the minds of the parties to the agreement that conditions would ever change. At that time wages, materials, and other costs that enter into the operation of railways were very different to what they are to-day. That arrangement continued for many years, and the Canadian Pacific Railway and other roads kept their rates much below the maxima fixed thereunder. Ultimately during the war railway operating costs went so high that the Crowsnest pass agreement had to be suspended for a period of years. At the expiration of that period there was a clamour, especially from the west, for a reversion to the Crowsnest pass rates. Unfortunately the cost of railway operation at that time did not

9 p.m. justify the restoration of these rates. In 1922 this House appointed a committee to investigate the freight rate question, and that committee summoned before it not only all the railway magnates

of Canada but also many from across the border. Mr. Beatty, of the Canadian Pacific Railway, usually acted as spokesman for the railways. He made several propositions, the final one being for a general reduction of 20 per cent in the rates on all basic commodities to all parts of Canada. That committee finally, by a small majority, passed a resolution recommending the acceptance of this proposition. But the western members rebelled and said they must have the Crowsnest pass rates regardless of what any other part of Canada might get. Naturally they might be expected to take this course, but I did not quite agree with the government's yielding to the demand The outcome has been that whilst, the prairie provinces have secured the restoration of the Crowsnest pass rates, which represent approximately a 35 per cent reduction in the freight rates on grain to the head of the lakes, the rest of Canada got a reduction of only 6 per cent in - the rates on basic commodities.

Topic:   RAILWAY FREIGHT RATES
Subtopic:   BILL TO AMEND THE RAILWAY ACT, '1919
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June 5, 1925

Mr. McCREA:

Carried.

Topic:   SECOND READING
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June 4, 1925

1. What is the total gross earnings of the Canadian National Railways, in all its connections and branches, giving the said earnings in each province separately?

2. What is the total gross operating expenditure in each one of the provinces, showing each province separately ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-EARNINGS AND EXPENDITURE
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April 27, 1925

Mr. McCREA:

Which system would do the amalgamating?

Topic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE.
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